Ruger Predator 22” .223 periodic failure to eject

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Joined
Sep 25, 2022
Messages
58
Location
Northern Virginia
I have had this rifle for about two months.

At the range, we would not notice that the cartridge didnt eject and then a new round will not chamber….of course.

i bought a 5-pack of dummy rounds to watch what is happening.

chamber a round, retract the bolt, cartridge ejects……

i keep a consistent speed.

Usually the fourth round will not eject and just sit in there In the way.

Sometimes the cartridge simply doesn't eject….sometimes they all cycle normally.

This is my first bolt rifle. Are supposed to forcefully cycle the bolt to send the cartridge flying?
Does the speed matter?

I want to like Ruger, god knows we have enough of them here.
 

kmoore

Buckeye
Joined
Mar 29, 2017
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1,335
Location
Idaho
At the range, I and maybe some of we tend to baby the bolt to catch the brass on the table or not to need to hunt and pick it up on the ground. The bolt should be worked hard and fast, you want that spend round out ASAP and a new one in the chamber when hunting, shooting some matches and even if using for Self Defense. Also at the range I normally just single load and examine the brass, letting the chamber cool off before adding another round in it when shooting those tiny little groups. But I do full load function tests and the bolt is worked hard and fast. That will show if the ejector is weak. It also helps to reduce possible short stroking the bolt and jamming the rifle when you're needing it to work.
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
7,814
Location
missouri
Since I have no idea how the Ruger ejector works I'm just a spectator. If the ejector is a 'manual' (AKA Mauser type), working the bolt faster will produce more energetic ejection. If the ejector is a spring loaded plunger, two things could be happening.
1: The ejector is dragging due to a manufacturing burr or lack of lubrication.
2: The ejector is working OK but the extractor hook is losing it's grip too early in the bolt cycle.
 
Joined
Sep 25, 2022
Messages
58
Location
Northern Virginia
You check Rugers web site?

I am cross-eyed looking for the right video. Perhaps younger eyes has the patients to pour through these...


I wrote them and asked to just send me a link. I found a video on youtube university, and there is this one dude pounding on a pin on the bolt with a freakin hammer, with the baby in the background....NO THANKS. There are good videos and there are good videos.
 
Joined
Sep 25, 2022
Messages
58
Location
Northern Virginia
Since I have no idea how the Ruger ejector works I'm just a spectator. If the ejector is a 'manual' (AKA Mauser type), working the bolt faster will produce more energetic ejection. If the ejector is a spring loaded plunger, two things could be happening.
1: The ejector is dragging due to a manufacturing burr or lack of lubrication.
2: The ejector is working OK but the extractor hook is losing it's grip too early in the bolt cycle.
I just ordered an American Hunter in .308 having bought a standard .308 by mistake...( anyone want to buy it NIB?) gee I hope buying another Ruger isn't a mistake. I don't know what is wrong with the rifle.....but, working the bolt at a resonable speed produced a round(s) that failed to eject. There shouldn't be much to working the bolt action rifle.
 
Last edited:

hittman

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Jan 16, 2008
Messages
11,883
Location
Illinois
How does the gun cycle with real ammo in it and not the dummy rounds?

Are you using good quality NEW ammo with brass cases?

Was the bolt removed and cleaned of all packing grease, then oiled up good?

They who sent you replacement parts? Ruger? Which parts?
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
7,814
Location
missouri
^^^"Was the bolt removed and cleaned of all packing grease, then oiled up good?"^^^ Good Question
Lubrication is your friend during 'break in'. So many 'experts' have loudly denounced the overuse of lubricants that many shooters don't understand that lubrication is NOT a factor in 99% of firearms use. Sure, if/when taking a firearm into extremely cold or extremely dirty environments over lubrication may/will cause malfunctions. This has NOTHING to do with applying ample lubrication during break in or even normal range use. There will be time to remove the excess lube before it's a problem.
Clean the thick, sticky preservative from the bolt using something like BRAKEKLEEN and compressed air. Lube the cocking cam and bolt lugs with a dab of grease(I use Red Tacky wheel bearing grease). Put a drop of CLP into the bolt face ejector recess and another drop around the extractor. THEN run your dummy rounds through the magazine to chamber and eject cycle 50 times.
 

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