Ruger P97 anymore fans

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Colonel Daddy

Buckeye
Joined
Apr 5, 2005
Messages
1,473
Ruger Forum Member "btrumanj" is a big fan of the P97 and he was a major influence in me purchasing a P90.
 

railroader

Single-Sixer
Joined
May 10, 2009
Messages
147
I have a p97 and it is a keeper. Super reliable and very accurate. It's too bad they have been discontinued. Mark
 

btrumanj

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 29, 2005
Messages
490
Like the good Colonel Daddy says, the P97 is my every day carry gun. Fairly light for caliber, accurate and reliable and conceals pretty easily. And, it doesn't have all those new fangled safety features I neither need nor want. Nuff said :)

Picture344.jpg
 

Sloman

Bearcat
Joined
May 27, 2003
Messages
78
Why did Ruger discontinue the P97? It is and was a good gun. Why mess with something that worked?
 

cavediver27

Bearcat
Joined
Apr 15, 2005
Messages
25
Sloman":1ss91yd9 said:
Why did Ruger discontinue the P97? It is and was a good gun. Why mess with something that worked?

It was replaced with the "politically correct" P345 that had a loaded chamber indicator, magazine disconnect and internal key lock. I guess Ruger was more concerned about selling in Commy-fornia than with keeping a solid and reliable pistol like the P97.

I have a KP97DC and it is one of my favorite pistols. It is accurate, reliable, easy to CC and has never had a failure of any kind.

My P97 is a keeper!
 

GaryA

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 27, 2001
Messages
230
I owned a P97DC which I unfortunately no longer have (sigh). Mine did not seem to exhibit any slide-release problems and was a good shooter and seemingly very well built. Recently, after reading and hearing many good comments, I purchased a KP345 w/o rail which seems to be a very nice pistol. So far it has been reliable and quite accurate and feels very good in my hand. I was not attracted to the P345 when it was introduced, not liking the new "features" and feeling the frame was not as robustly built as the P97. Nevertheless, while I am very fond of the P97, the P345 does seem to improve on some aspects while losing ground on others. I don't think the P345 is as robustly built (I could be wrong) but expect it is more than adequate to stand up to the expected round count I intend to put through this gun over the years. I like the size and handling of the P345 better than the P97. The loaded chamber indicator is not a problem for me, though I could live without it. I would prefer no magazine disconnect but that is also not a problem. I'm not crazy about the internal lock but Ruger's design seems very good and I simply don't use it. My P345, of course, has the Safety/decocker. I used to not like that, preferring the Decock Only feature, but have come to appreciate it on my P90 and now my P345. No big deal swiping it off after decocking. I still wish I had my P97 but the P345 seems to me a fine pistol in its own right and I can see why Ruger would not offer both of them in the marketplace. They would occupy the same niche in the marketplace and take sales from each other thereby negatively affecting production costs for both pistols.
 

P90

Single-Sixer
Joined
Sep 22, 2005
Messages
359
I have 2 97's and a 90. This is my Carry Weapon by choice. Both the 90 and 97 are excellent guns, but the 97 fits me best.
April212007012.jpg
 

wildturk

Single-Sixer
Joined
Mar 21, 2005
Messages
174
I've had a KP97 since they first came out, it's been a good pistol. Unfortunately it doesn't see much use, but I'd never sell it.
 

airwin

Bearcat
Joined
Mar 9, 2001
Messages
88
Fortunately I am a proud owner of a KP97DC. I have fired many different guns in the past, but for me, the P97 is the best .45 pistol I know. It fits perfect in my hand, is balanced very well, reliable, is not too heavy and the construction is simple. I´m sure, Ruger would sell many P97 if they would still produce this great pistol.
 

P90

Single-Sixer
Joined
Sep 22, 2005
Messages
359
keano":1xjc5201 said:
what is a good CC holster for the 97?
I carry mine in a Milt Sparks VM2HS. The horsehide works better in the summer when you sweat a lot.
 

P90

Single-Sixer
Joined
Sep 22, 2005
Messages
359
Heres something that I thought the P97 fans would enjoy if you already don't know it. The P97 is unique from any of the other P-series pistols in the way they work.

Mechanically Novel
In terms of mechanical operation, the P97 barrel tilts to lock and unlock, Browning-style-as do all P-Series pistols. However, the P97 uses a camblock system to cause this motion instead of the Model 1911-type toggle link employed on metal-frame P-Series guns. During the firing cycle the P97 barrel is accelerated to a high speed as it moves back and down to unlock from the slide. Once it leaves contact with the slide, the barrel must be brought to a stop. As Ruger puts it in the P97 information release, "a novel system allows us to do so without impact damage to the polymer frame." Novel, indeed. "Unique" or "innovative" would be more how I would put it since the P97 system is different from any other metal or polymer .45 ACP pistol on the market.

The effect of barrel (and slide) impact has been a major engineering problem for polymer-frame autoloader designers since the moment Gaston Glock woke up from the middle of a good night's sleep with the original "plastic gun" idea in his head. Many different ideas have been tried and discarded, and a wide variety of different solutions are used by various manufacturers for their varying-caliber, current-production polymer-frame pistols. For high slide/barrel-acceleration loads like the .45 ACP, the most common systems involve either a separate metal recoil block or camblock of some sort set into the polymer frame or some type of cushioning system involving the recoil spring/guide rod assembly (or a combination of both). The P97 takes those concepts a step further.

On the P97 the linkless camming surfaces that guide and pull the unlocking barrel downward from the slide and absorb the impact of the barrel's rearward recoil acceleration are an integral part of the rear portion of the recoil spring guide rod itself. In fact, this part-which on any other autoloader would be called the guide rod-Ruger calls the camblock (there is no part actually called a guide rod anywhere in the P97). The thing looks like an ordinary full-length guide rod with a big, cam-ramped lug on the end, and it's a really neat design. The camblock is held in the frame by the crosspin of the slide stop. In firing, the barrel comes backward, is pulled away from the slide by the camming ramp, and is stopped by the recoil-spring-enclosed camblock with no direct impact against the frame at all. It's a slick idea, originally developed and patented by Ruger in slightly different form for the polymer-frame 9mm P95. And it works. Plus the P97 still disassembles and reassembles in a completely conventional manner, just like any other Ruger P-Series pistol.
 

Trebor Snave

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 14, 2007
Messages
71
Another P97 fan here. I carry mine in a Milt Sparks Executive Companion.

I did have issues with the slide stop departing the frame when I first got it, but Ruger sent me the parts to make it right.
 

RPHarder

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Messages
183
Agree with the rest of you. Mostly, a revolver type of guy, heavy on the SA. In fact my P97DC is the only semi action pistol I have. Everytime that I think about selling it, all I need to do is take it out shooting and it changes my mind.
 

Buckeye!

Blackhawk
Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
715
I sold a G21 , G21SF and a G36 when i pruchased my P97...those Glocks just started laying in the safe..my 1911 doesn't go out much anymore ..thinking bout grabbing a P90
seem to be going for at more than fair prices.
 

Gutpile Charlie

Bearcat
Joined
Mar 25, 2006
Messages
7
I've got a KP97DC, that also had a problem with the slide stop backing out. It was that way, brand new, right out of the box.

A quick call to Ruger set that straight. They sent me a new one and it has run like a million dollars ever since.

The P97? An excellent firearm! :D
 

P90

Single-Sixer
Joined
Sep 22, 2005
Messages
359
P97's are drying up on the used market. Most are keeping theirs, and in a couple more years, I think they will be hard to get. There were a lot made, but a lot of people are like me and don't want to part with them since they can't buy any new ones.
 

Buckeye!

Blackhawk
Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
715
P90":r2fuua72 said:
P97's are drying up on the used market. Most are keeping theirs, and in a couple more years, I think they will be hard to get. There were a lot made, but a lot of people are like me and don't want to part with them since they can't buy any new ones.

I agree alot guys are like myself..tried other more exspensive semi's only to like thre P97 more.Its one gun that i'll not part with..
thats a big statement for me ..i like to trade.
 

resident

Single-Sixer
Joined
Apr 3, 2010
Messages
412
OK... exactly WHAT is the difference between the early "troublesome" slide stops that self-removed...and the subsequent "improved" ones that Ruger used as replacements?
 

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