Ruger/Marlin rifles

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jdavis

Single-Sixer
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Feb 13, 2011
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116
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Florida
Ruger has a wide open field as far as caliber choices go. I don’t know anyone that doesn’t like the Marlin 39A . Henry owns the .22 lever action market, but a new Ruger produced Marlin 39A could change that If priced competitively.
 

Sam Summey

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 24, 2009
Messages
244
Location
Flat Rock, NC
My only experience is with Henry rim fires, but Marlin 39’s are indeed much better.
I talked to the Ruger people concerning the possibility of a 39A. The receiver is made up of two forgings which will make the product pricey. I am sure their "bean counters" are reluctant to go to market with a product more expensive than the Henry product. On the other hand, there are quite a few folks out there in the shooting world who are willing to pay over $200 for a thousand primers. ($167+25 ship+35 haz mat = $227)
 

eveled

Hunter
Joined
Apr 3, 2012
Messages
4,428
I can see it must be an expensive gun to make. It would be hard to convince someone to spend a lot more on a 39, when the Henry .22’s are so popular and cheaper.
 
Joined
Oct 20, 2022
Messages
53
Location
Oregon
I talked to the Ruger people concerning the possibility of a 39A. The receiver is made up of two forgings which will make the product pricey. I am sure their "bean counters" are reluctant to go to market with a product more expensive than the Henry product. On the other hand, there are quite a few folks out there in the shooting world who are willing to pay over $200 for a thousand primers. ($167+25 ship+35 haz mat = $227)
I own a Henry .22. While it is butter smooth and has been 100% reliable and accurate, it is not one of my favorites. If you’ve never disassembled a Henry .22, here’s an overview. The outside of the receiver is merely a Zamak cover, held on by 4 screws, 2 per side. The inner “chassis” is also Zamak, the barrel is pressed and pinned into this chassis and the moving parts slide on grooves in the chassis. The pins and many moving parts are steel. For those who aren’t familiar with Zamak, it’s a zinc alloyed with aluminum, magnesium, etc. same stuff they make Hot Wheels chassis out of. I can’t say anything bad about the rifle, and as a company Henry has great customer service, is 100% American Made, and I love their American values. The .22 is good to look at and functionally excellent- and their line of center fire rifles are built like tanks and share none of the build characteristics of the .22

Where am I going with this? You mentioned 2 forgings. I’m assuming steel. I would gladly pay more for a steel .22 lever action. Especially one built with the quality we have come to expect from Ruger.

Call me what you will- this is why I have a hard time liking my Wrangler, and I won’t own a Heritage no matter how cheap they are.
 

mishtub

Blackhawk
Joined
Oct 24, 2011
Messages
582
Location
Kansas
As long as they solve the 1894 "Jam-o-matic" problem of the lifter, they'll be a good gun.
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
22,138
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
Sorry for the delay in getting back here. I'm now home from SHOT.

Yes,, there will be the 336 in 30-30 as well as the 1984 in 44 mag. Have a little patience in supply issues because as they told me,, "We want to get it RIGHT before we go into production." In some of the models,, they are partially "reverse engineering" as well as implementing modern methods of manufacturing to allow them to product a bunch of guns faster.
Part of the process where they've been working HARD to perfect is the heat treating, AND still being able to machine the guns. If they machine the guns, then heat treat (to Ruger standards) it's cause warping of the metal. If they heat treat first,, then it is much harder, (and much more expensive) to make them.

What I saw was the solid efforts to make a top quality product. And while the prices of some of the guns is higher than we'd like to see,, the current expense of raw steel of the types they need,, can we all say VERY expensive?

And I know a lot of folks want a specific model & caliber etc. It'll be a long time before they branch out into the "not as popular" (meaning slow sellers) calibers & models.

But rest assured,, they are working HARD at giving us excellent quality, and well built Marlins.
 

Cholo

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Dec 30, 2008
Messages
6,585
Location
Georgia
I just saw these pics of the new Marlin 336. I hope they can keep it up with the nice wood!

Marlin-336.jpg

New-Marlin-scaled.jpg
 

peachhead

Single-Sixer
Joined
Mar 14, 2017
Messages
138
Definitely agree on the wood. Personally, I think they should have come out with this model first considering the 30-30 is one of the most popular calibers ever.
 

RC44Mag

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 18, 2022
Messages
608
Location
Long Island
I have late production Remlin 336C and contrary to what we’ve all heard it’s quite well built. Fit and finish is great. The only issue if I can can call it that was the action was a little stiff. I sat down in front of the tube after lubing it up and I just kept working the action. Less than an hour later it loosened up nicely. Im looking for to hearing reports from owners of the new ones.
 

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