Ruger Mark Trigger Modification

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SGW Gunsmith

Blackhawk
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Ruger has been using the same style of trigger, pretty much at least, for almost 70 years. The main complaint that I get concerning these "anodized aluminum" triggers, is the inconsistent trigger pull some produce. Yah, I know, it all depends on what sort of shooting is being done with your Ruger pistol. So, if a better, more consistent trigger pull isn't on your "must have" list, please don't waste time reading this.

I have found, over the 47 years that I've had heavy interest in the Ruger Mark pistols, that the aluminum trigger can be made to, at least, feel better and no so, as some describe, "squishy", during trigger pull. Yes, there are other factors that contribute to what I call, "a SOFT" trigger pull, but I feel the place to start is the trigger. Indeed, there are several aftermarket triggers that can be purchased and most all are a drop-in solution. Still, if you have the means and ability, along with the desire, to better your factory trigger, here's something to ponder.

sGTK3r5m.jpg


This Ruger factory trigger has had the pivot pin hole drilled over-size, and then a "reamed inside diameter" steel bushing was inserted into the factory trigger. Ruger aluminum factory triggers are often found with an elliptical, or lobed, pivot pin diameter. The steel bushing insert will correct that problem and provide a much more consistent trigger pull & feel.
Then, it's a simple matter to add pre & over-travel screws, if so desired, to have your trigger adjustable for those options.
 

DGW1949

Hunter
Joined
Apr 10, 2005
Messages
3,653
Location
Texas
SGW Gunsmith said:
DGW1949 said:
Good post.
What alloy was used to make the bushing?

Thanks.

DGW

0-1 tool steel.

Thanks.
Once upon a time, I made all of my parts out of 4140, but have since learned that that don't always work the best. Then again, I'm not a gun smith by any stretch...just a tinkerer.

DGW
 

Carry_Up

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 22, 2007
Messages
376
Location
Dallas, TX
In my personal opinion, we have just crossed over into imagination theater. Mechanically, it is easy to understand the concept of a perfectly fitted pin in a perfectly fitted pin hole. But saying that the aluminum trigger causes the trigger pull to be squishy...excuse me, but I'm missing my favorite TV show. Perhaps the OP is referring to a stiction problem - something that would not necessarily be fixed by tightening up the tolerance and changing materials?? Since we are talking firearms, a hand-lapped fit between 2 moving parts isn't going to cut it once the parts are covered with residue (which is typical in this area of the gun). After trigger takeup, there really isn't any movement between trigger and trigger pin to speak of, especially if using aftermarket arrangement with light pull weight.

CU
 

SGW Gunsmith

Blackhawk
Joined
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Messages
966
Location
Northwestern Wisconsin
Carry_Up said:
In my personal opinion, we have just crossed over into imagination theater. Mechanically, it is easy to understand the concept of a perfectly fitted pin in a perfectly fitted pin hole. But saying that the aluminum trigger causes the trigger pull to be squishy...excuse me, but I'm missing my favorite TV show. Perhaps the OP is referring to a stiction problem - something that would not necessarily be fixed by tightening up the tolerance and changing materials?? Since we are talking firearms, a hand-lapped fit between 2 moving parts isn't going to cut it once the parts are covered with residue (which is typical in this area of the gun). After trigger takeup, there really isn't any movement between trigger and trigger pin to speak of, especially if using aftermarket arrangement with light pull weight.

CU

A what? :roll: Geez! My dictionary doesn't carry that sophisticated, scientific, terminology, like ( stiction ). You know what they say about opinions, right? Well, During the 47+ years I've work with and on these Ruger Mark pistols, my opinions have been learned from actual EXPERIENCE, not fiction or watching TV. What "hand-lapped" parts are you writing about? I can't find any reference to that method in my initial post.
Methods learned have evolved from actually doing things that make these pistols better. The method described above may not be understandable to a hobbyist or amateur, but for those who actually know about these Ruger Mark pistols, they will understand what the "improvement" involves. :p
 

NikA

Buckeye
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Nov 2, 2014
Messages
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Yrisarri, NM- high in the Manzanos
All I see in the OP is a method of tightening tolerances with an insert that is more wear-resistant than the original. O-1 seems excessive unless the trigger pin is also hardened, but otherwise, there's no question that this is a simple and effective way to work on a piece like this.
 

SGW Gunsmith

Blackhawk
Joined
May 15, 2010
Messages
966
Location
Northwestern Wisconsin
NikA said:
All I see in the OP is a method of tightening tolerances with an insert that is more wear-resistant than the original. O-1 seems excessive unless the trigger pin is also hardened, but otherwise, there's no question that this is a simple and effective way to work on a piece like this.

Actually, the bushing wasn't hardened. Probably distort too badly if it were. O-1 is fairly easy to machine in its arrived condition and is left-over stock from another project. A responder asked what I had used, but I'm sure that cold rolled, mild steel, would work just as well with the factory pivot pin.
 

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