Roux question

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4896worker

Bearcat
Joined
May 3, 2017
Messages
13
Look up making roux in oven . Just put cup of flour in cast iron pan in oven at 350 for hour or until it gets dark enough for you. Stir the dry flour every 15 min to brilliant it is the color of light peanut butter . Then use it th make a slurry to thicken the liquid.
The dry flour will darken when you make the slurry .
This also makes the gumbo less oily
 
Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
5,739
Location
Richmond Texas USA
CHICKEN AND SAUSAGE GUMBO
People often over-complicate gumbo, and understandably so; it's one of those dishes that everyone has an opinion on how it should be made. Growing up, I noticed that my momma kept her proteins separated by land and sea. She also had rules that you never put okra or tomato in chicken and sausage gumbo, which makes it a Cajun-Style Gumbo as opposed to her Creole-Style Seafood Gumbo, which has tomato and okra. She used to always tell me when you cook with all your heart and soul, people will taste it in the dish. I promise you, you will feel the love with this succulent dish.

IMG_7678.jpeg
 

Gabe85

Bearcat
Joined
Jun 28, 2022
Messages
16
Location
USA
I'm now hungry, haha.

I think your color is appropriate.
Everything depends on how you like it.
 

eveled

Hunter
Joined
Apr 3, 2012
Messages
4,420
It tastes even better today!

As predicted nobody in my family would eat it. So I’ll be taking it for lunch all week! Their loss.

I’ll be sure to have file powder and ocra on hand next time.
 

kcsteve

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 25, 2010
Messages
175
I was just over on the Food Network and found some handgun loads for a .44 magnum. Who knew?
 

eveled

Hunter
Joined
Apr 3, 2012
Messages
4,420
There are almost 1000 pages of posts in the lounge. About 80% of them are non gun related.

I’m honored you chose my post to make a snarky comment in.
 

RC44Mag

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 18, 2022
Messages
599
Location
Long Island
It say right under the title Lounge
”This Area is for Relaxing and Discussing Issues for Any Subject on Your Mind So Long as it is in Good Taste”

sounds like it fits the bill perfectly and in good taste.

my Friend and his wife just got back from New Orleans yesterday after Attending his friends wedding down there. They loved it and my wife and I will be joining them for a long weekend in there the near future.

He just invited us over for a homemade dinner this weekend they’re going to make. Shrimp and grits and gumbo on the menu. I passed along info from this thread for their first attempt at it. It’ll probably help them do it better. Thanks for posting.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
5,739
Location
Richmond Texas USA
I was just over on the Food Network and found some handgun loads for a .44 magnum. Who knew?
Well kcsteve maybe you should go back over there. They might teach you how to whip up a big ole bowl of ETIQUETTE with a plate of manners on the side.
Your comment is funny though:) I must have missed that one on Food Network which is my favorite site.
 

kcsteve

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 25, 2010
Messages
175
Well kcsteve maybe you should go back over there. They might teach you how to whip up a big ole bowl of ETIQUETTE with a plate of manners on the side.
Your comment is funny though:) I must have missed that one on Food Network which is my favorite site.
Since when are you a judge of etiquette and manners?
Did I hurt your feelings or something?
 

tazbigdog

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 21, 2011
Messages
586
Location
Arizona
Gumbo
792B9DC3-0DF2-4B2A-BA8F-B191E734B0ED.jpeg

Gumbo is a stew or soup that originated in southern Louisiana during the 18th century. It consists primarily of a strongly-flavored stock, meat or shellfish, a thickener, and the vegetable holy trinity of celery, bell peppers, and onions. Gumbo is often categorized by the type of thickener used: the African vegetable okra, the Choctaw spice filé powder (dried and ground sassafras leaves), or roux, the French base made of flour and fat. The dish likely derived its name from either the Bantu word for okra (ki ngombo) or the Choctaw word for file

Several different varieties exist. Creole gumbo generally contains shellfish, tomatoes, and a thickener. Cajun gumbo is generally based on a dark roux and is spicier, with either shellfish or fowl. Sausage or ham are often added to gumbos of either variety. After the base is prepared, vegetables are cooked down, and then meat is added. The dish simmers for a minimum of three hours, with shellfish and some spices added near the end. If desired, filé powder is added after the pot is removed from heat. Gumbo is traditionally served over rice. A third, lesser-known variety, the meatless gumbo z'herbes, is essentially a gumbo of slow-cooked greens sometimes thickened with roux, with rice served on the side.


Ingredients
1 cup vegetable oil
1 cup all-purpose flour
6 white onions, chopped (about 1 ½ cups)
6 red bell peppers, seeded, chopped (about 7 cups)
8 celery stalks, chopped (about 3 cups)
Creole seasoning
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon Chili powder
Several squirts of Worcestershire Sauce
1 cup dry white wine
½ tbsp. chopped fresh thyme
½ tbsp. Oregano
4 bay leaves
2 28-ounce cans diced tomatoes with juice
2 cans of tomato paste
4 8-ounce bottles clam juice
6 cups low-salt chicken broth
4 pounds Andouille (or chorizo) sausage, cut crosswise into ½-inch-thick slices
3 pounds skinless boneless chicken thighs, cut into 1-inch cubes
2 16-ounce packages sliced frozen okra
1 tablespoon file powder

4 pounds peeled deveined medium shrimp
Minced fresh Italian parsley
½ cup green onion chopped

Steamed rice

Directionsh
Combine the oil and flour in a large cast iron or enameled cast iron Dutch oven over medium heat. Stirring slowly and constantly for 20 to 25 minutes, make a dark brown roux, the color of very dark chocolate. KEEP STIRRING WITH A WHISK.

Add the onions, celery, and bell peppers and continue to stir for 4 to 5 minutes, or until wilted. Add the sausage, salt, cayenne, oregano, thyme, and bay leaves. Continue to stir for 3 to 4 minutes. Add the chicken broth. Stir until the roux mixture and water are well combined. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low. Cook, uncovered, stirring occasionally, for 1 hour.

Season the chicken with the creole seasoning and add to the pot. Add diced tomatoes, white wine and clam juice. Simmer for 2 hours. Skim off any fat that rises to the surface. Use tomato paste to thicken, if necessary. When ½ hour left, stir in frozen okra and shrimp.

Remove from the heat. Stir in the parsley, green onions, and file powder. Remove the bay leaves and serve in deep bowls.
 

kcsteve

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 25, 2010
Messages
175
Pretty simple to be a judge after reading your post. You didn't hurt my feelings. You can not believe how little I care. You might have ruffled eveled feathers a weeeee bit.
You must care. Stop judging people. Quit whining and learn to laugh a little.
 
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