Reloading the Blackhawk

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Jeepnik

Hawkeye
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Some of us here carry a Ruger single action for self defense. Now we are constantly told we are, everything, from crazy to just plain stupid. Be that as it may, we feel confident in our choice. There is one thing that we can't deny is that reloading is slower than most other types of handguns.

Lately I've been working with my single six and it's .22 lr and .22 mag cylinders. I''ve sound that I can swap cylnders much faster than I can empty and reload the one in the revolver. This got me to wondering would it be possible to obtain additional cylinders for my .45 colt Blackhawk? Would they need to be factory fitted?

Also, along those lines I saw a conversion that resulted in the cylinder base pin poping forward under spring tension when the release was pushed. I've only seen it once on the net and have not found it since. Anyone else seen such a thing?
 

contender

Ruger Guru
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I've bought, used & swapped Ruger cylinders around for a long time. I've never had to have one timed for alignment. I DO always check alignment BEFORE shooting a round in one though. I have had to take one, hone the front of the cylinder boss to allow it to fit the OAL of the gun that needed it.
That said,, yes,, it's an idea that can work as you describe.

Never seen anything where a cylinder base pin popped forward. Nor,, would I want one to do that. Recoil often causes a base pin to work forward if it's not fitted tightly. That can lock up a gun. One that would pop forward could lock up if it popped when not wanted.
If I were to consider the idea of a faster removal,, I'd opt for a different base pin, like the Keith design. Easier to grasp & pull on.
 

needsmostuff

Single-Sixer
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Sep 4, 2008
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368
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Tucson,AZ
I think you are asking questions similar to having a cake and eating it too.
Extra cylinders will be pricey and personally I would not be a fan of walking around with a couple of loaded cylinders hanging on my belt.
If faster reloads were possible the CASS guys would have found a way. But they drop the gun and grab another.
If your gonna carry a SA you best get very good at 5 or 6 shot placements and get the job done ,,,,,,,,,,,,, or carry 2 guns.
If faster reloads are required you may have to suck it up and go with a bottom feeder or something with moon clips.
 

contender

Ruger Guru
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I don't think he was saying it would be unsafe.

Spare cylinders, loaded with ammo, are heavier. Plus, to be carried on the belt or wherever, they would have to have a pouch or something to keep the ammo from falling out of each chamber. With moonclips,, the all is easily held in place.

I Clint Eastwoods movie "Pale Rider" he carries spare cylinders in pouches on his belt.

SASS shooters use (2) revolvers,, each loaded with (5) rounds. SOMETIMES,, a stage may require a 6th shot. For that,, the cowboys like having the ability to open the gate, grab a single round, and load it in the empty chamber, the reverse index the cylinder for faster engagement of the target.

I understand the desire to carry & use a SA for daily SD. I've been known to carry a SA revolver often.
I just hope I can hit my target(s) before needing a reload. That's why I practice shooting a lot.
 

Biggfoot44

Blackhawk
Joined
Sep 6, 2009
Messages
821
Real World best practices for defensive SA carry ?

After 5 well aimed potent rounds , consider the SA out of action for the rest of the engagement , and perform a New York Reload . Preferably with a DA Revolver or semi , with its own speedloader or spare mag .
 

Enigma

Hunter
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Apr 17, 2002
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2,149
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Houston metro area, TX
The inability to reload quickly is one big negative factor about carrying an SA revolver for defense. Another is weight. The weight factor could, of course, be mitigated somewhat by leaving the aluminum grip frame and ejector rod housing in place. But still, you've got a big, heavy, six-shot gun that you cannot quickly reload. In a strictly rural setting, that may not be as much of an issue as in an urban setting, where multiple bad actors are always a consideration. While I have confidence in my ability with my SA revolvers, I prefer to carry something else the vast majority of the time. Lately, it's been a plastic-fantastic 9mm.
 

Jeepnik

Hawkeye
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As I stated in my original post, there are folks who just can’t resist telling SA carriers all he ways we are wrong. We know the limitations. Heck we know them better than the folks who insult and belittle us. But I guess it’s human nature that some folks must convince themselves their way is the only right way.
 

suren2us

Bearcat
Joined
Jan 16, 2022
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In my experience it depends ..... We can fit it if its too tight but not other way.. I would ask for measurements before you buy
 
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It used to be said most gunfights happened at less than 7 yds, with an average of less than three bullets fired. Now that everyone has high capacity wonder 9’s. I think spray and pray has overtaken aimed firing from when the LEO/armed citizen had a six shot revolver. My father, a DI in WWll, taught me aimed fire with semi auto guns. When I got into LE that was discouraged at under 7 yds. 🤣🤣🤣 My qualification scores were in the 90’s%. Carry what you will, and hit what you are shooting at.
gramps
 

kmoore

Buckeye
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Idaho
A SA revolver used as a SD gun when empty at best it's a great club. A Glock is not much of a club, but I did slap the side of a runners head with one once. He sure did not like it.
Story is he was wanted, he ran, I chased. As he ran he spun his backpack around to his front and opened it. In a foot chase unholstering can be a bad idea. In this case I figured he was going for a gun to shoot me, so I unholstered. He decided it was time to stop and face me with his hand still in the backpack. The quickest way to end this game was a head slap and no time to holster the gun. He hit the cement hard and gave up. He only had dope in the pack. The review was authorized force. It was said it was the same as a softening technique to stop a combative person during arrest or escape. I guessed it would generate a tort claim for 200,000. The standard amount without lasting injuries. The crook did not file and took his lumps that time.
 

9x23w

Bearcat
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Nov 1, 2011
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Hudson Valley, NY
SA's will work for self defense if you are proficient but still not the best choice. Statistics have shown that 6 rounds will work most of the time. Just like not wearing a seat belt will work most of the time. But what if you're unlucky? This is your life we're talking about. I would not want to try and reload an SA under very stressful situations.

A good 357 Sig auto or 7 shot 357 revolver are better choices.
 

Shamus2022

Bearcat
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Apr 14, 2022
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VT
You'all do know that a SA never runs dry... right? Fire two and start reloading as you shoot... you'll never be empty.
 
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I guess I never got the memo, as I also have carried a SA as my concealed piece many times, and I am perfectly confident doing so, and will continue to do so when the occasion is correct to do so.

Although carrying extra cylinders would not be my cup of tea, if it works for somebody else, so be it. Our esteemed colleague Contender has already mentioned Pale Rider. If it works for Clint Eastwood, that should make it good enough.

We all handle this carry scenario differently. I never carry moon clips or a speed loader for a DA revolver. I never carry extra magazines for a semi auto pistol. But I always have a mouse gun in my shirt pocket. That's my reload.
 
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