Recharge your car's A/C

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Pat-inCO

Hawkeye
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
5,737
While I understand many of you are not in the least concerned with A/C for your
car, this time of year, I have learned more about that process in the last few weeks
than I ever wanted to know.

Finished up recharging my Outback's A/C about an hour ago. Went from marginally
adequate cooling (a month ago when it was really hot) to the point this afternoon,
with windows wide open, temperature of 87, and almost freezing my feet off. All for
the cost of a combination gage/connector ($20) and one 8oz can of R-1234yf ($32).
WHAT A DIFFERENCE! - - Nice part is that the next time, the gage/connector is
paid for and it will only cost the $32 for the refrigerant. - - - Which could be two
or three or five years away.

What blew me away was that it was in the "safe operating range" to start with,
brought the reading up just a little, but changed the output from 60 degrees(F) to
32 degrees(F). And the meter showed less than five pounds difference in the
reading (from low green to 1/3rd into the green).

Types of refrigerant:
~ Type #3: R12 -- The Old and Busted One
For many years, R12 was the automotive refrigerant standard. It was effective and
cheap. However, scientists quickly discovered its sinister secret: It was partially
responsible for the rapidly-depleting ozone layer. In 1994, it was banned from all
new cars sold in the US.
~ Type #2: R134a -- The One That's (Probably) In Your Car Right Now
In most cars that are on the road today, R134a refrigerant makes the A/C system
blow cold on hot days. Selected for its low flammability and safety, as well as
because it's kinder to the environment, almost every car built since 1994 is
equipped with R134a refrigerant.
~ Type #2: R1234yf -- The New gim-strummer one( :roll: )
R1234yf was chosen to replace R134a in all new cars by 2021. Some
manufacturers have already made the switch, or the switch is in progress.
- This new refrigerant performs similarly to R134a, but with one important
difference: it breaks down much faster in the upper atmosphere. That means it'll
contribute less to global warming. It's also easy to upgrade a car's A/C system
from R134a to make it compatible with R1234yf. (just expensive)

Oh . . by . . the . . by:
~ R-1234yf is FLAMMABLE, and costs many times more to purchase!
~ The connector for R-1234yf is larger than the one for R134a, so your "old"
connector for R134a will NOT fit on the systems with R-1234yf!! :shock:
~ The source can connections are Right handed on the R134a and LEFT
handed on the R-1234yf. (kinda handy, actually)

Oh the joys of advancing technology. :roll:

P.S. Unless I messed something up, I'll be a happy camper next Summer. 8)
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
6,897
With several pieces of farm machinery with A/C plus 4 older pickups, having a 'filler upper thingy' is a must. I have one older JD that hasn't been totally changed over so it's running "RedTek" refrigerant but that's not a big deal since it only takes a can now and then to keep it working. Sprayer and combine are a different story--you keep the gauge and at least 3-4 cans of 134 handy anytime the machine is running.
 

RSIno1

Hunter
Joined
Sep 17, 2013
Messages
2,159
Pat-inCO said:
~ Type #3: R12 -- The Old and Busted One
For many years, R12 was the automotive refrigerant standard. It was effective and
cheap. However, scientists quickly discovered its sinister secret: It was partially
responsible for the rapidly-depleting ozone layer. In 1994, it was banned from all
new cars sold in the US.
It wasn't the earth it was all done for the $$$. The main reason it was banned is DuPont's patent was running out and they'd lose a lot of money. Banning R12 meant their new patent would be the money earner.

https://eng.ucmerced.edu/people/awesterling/SPR2014.ESS141/Assignments/DuPont
 

chm270

Single-Sixer
Joined
Nov 1, 2008
Messages
266
Flammable refrigerant.
What could go wrong?
A leak in the evaporator in the car,
fire up a smoke...
Back in the old R-12 days it was not uncommon (from what I heard) for cars coming from Mexico to have flammable freon
because they would mix propane with R12 as propane is much cheaper and works as a refrigerant. It also ruined R12 recycling machines.
But I guess they figure no one smokes in their cars anymore.
We'll see...........
 

Acorn

Buckeye
Joined
Sep 10, 2006
Messages
1,290
chm270 said:
Flammable refrigerant.
What could go wrong?
A leak in the evaporator in the car,
fire up a smoke...
But I guess they figure no one smokes in their cars anymore.
We'll see...........

Probably something like https://www.thedrive.com/article/13471/florida-couple-hauling-propane-grill-in-their-kia-light-cigarette-blow-up-car
You’d think they’d have noticed the smell. Or maybe it was “Honey did you shower this morning?……..BOOM!
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
11,171
RSIno1 said:
Pat-inCO said:
~ Type #3: R12 -- The Old and Busted One
For many years, R12 was the automotive refrigerant standard. It was effective and
cheap. However, scientists quickly discovered its sinister secret: It was partially
responsible for the rapidly-depleting ozone layer. In 1994, it was banned from all
new cars sold in the US.
It wasn't the earth it was all done for the $$$. The main reason it was banned is DuPont's patent was running out and they'd lose a lot of money. Banning R12 meant their new patent would be the money earner.

https://eng.ucmerced.edu/people/awesterling/SPR2014.ESS141/Assignments/DuPont


Good link. Actually, legislation against CFC production had already begun as a result of the "ozone hole" scare, and DuPont wisely decided to jump on what they saw as the bandwagon of the future and support the development of new refrigerants because it was evident that the old stuff was going to be banned and their market would suffer immensely. They managed to get a little time to do so by collaborating with the folks pushing the overall ban of CFCs, and appearing to be a savior of the atmosphere. Marketing made good. :wink:
 
Joined
Oct 26, 2006
Messages
9,325
Acorn said:
chm270 said:
Flammable refrigerant.
What could go wrong?
A leak in the evaporator in the car,
fire up a smoke...
But I guess they figure no one smokes in their cars anymore.
We'll see...........

Probably something like https://www.thedrive.com/article/13471/florida-couple-hauling-propane-grill-in-their-kia-light-cigarette-blow-up-car
You’d think they’d have noticed the smell. Or maybe it was “Honey did you shower this morning?……..BOOM!
Wow!!! I bet alcohol, or opiates or benzo’s etc we’re also involved in the decision making process!
gramps
 
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