Rattlesnakes, Mohave Green species are in Colorado

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Don Lovel

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Nov 10, 2003
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Molly and I were looking at a farm for sale over NE of La Veta pass north of Hwy 160, 8100 ft, land owner heard it first, it was about 3 ft from Molly, and it probably took her 45 seconds to see it, she did not panic, and I got her moved away and then dealt with the snake. But she was visibly shaken by the encounter.
Brightest green rattler I had ever seen, I wondered if Mohave, but I thought all we had were western Diamondback and Prairie rattlers, I looked on Google images when I got home, the pattern on prairie rattlers and Mohave Greens are similar, but no mistaking the bright green tint.
Dangerous as hell if one bites as they are neuro toxic and aggressive strikers when you stumble on one.
We don't have any rattlesnakes that I know of around Crestone, too high, too cold, alkali in the SLV supposedly deters them. I have looked while prospecting, never found one, lots of diamondbacks and prairie rattlers in Saguache side of SLV but none on east slope of high Sangre.
Needless to say, even though I have been warning her that sooner or later out here she will see one, that one was a scary encounter, too close with a very dangerous one. Sorry I did not have camera, was going to shoot it with SR1911, but really at first I tried to get it to just move away from where we were but it kept coming back at us so I shoveled it. Got the buttons for my hatband but the hide got shoveled.
 

BearBio

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Unlikely. The diagnostic are the large scales between the eyes (The scutulate scales). The front of either Stebbins' or Conant's field guides can show you which ones.
 

SAJohn

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Jan 6, 2007
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Terrebonne, Oregon, USA
The Mojave Greens are fairly rare and reclusive. I lived 30 years in the Mojave Desert and saw exactly one (and it was tan not green colored). They are doubly dangerous with both neuro and hema toxic venom.
 

huntsman22

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Kiowa/Deer Trail, CO
Prairie rattlers are kinda like chameleons. They gradually take on the color of their habitat. Here, the ones caught in the rimrock are brown, the ones in the wheat stubble are yellow-ish, ones in the sage are light green, and the ones in the riparian areas are a brighter green. There are no Mohaves here, no matter what anyone says.......
 

TinkerDave

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May 29, 2010
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New Hampshire
Don Lovel said:
Molly and I were looking at a farm for sale over NE of La Veta pass north of Hwy 160, 8100 ft, land owner heard it first, it was about 3 ft from Molly, and it probably took her 45 seconds to see it, she did not panic, and I got her moved away and then dealt with the snake. But she was visibly shaken by the encounter.
Brightest green rattler I had ever seen, I wondered if Mohave, but I thought all we had were western Diamondback and Prairie rattlers, I looked on Google images when I got home, the pattern on prairie rattlers and Mohave Greens are similar, but no mistaking the bright green tint.
Dangerous as hell if one bites as they are neuro toxic and aggressive strikers when you stumble on one.
We don't have any rattlesnakes that I know of around Crestone, too high, too cold, alkali in the SLV supposedly deters them. I have looked while prospecting, never found one, lots of diamondbacks and prairie rattlers in Saguache side of SLV but none on east slope of high Sangre.
Needless to say, even though I have been warning her that sooner or later out here she will see one, that one was a scary encounter, too close with a very dangerous one. Sorry I did not have camera, was going to shoot it with SR1911, but really at first I tried to get it to just move away from where we were but it kept coming back at us so I shoveled it. Got the buttons for my hatband but the hide got shoveled.
I am sorry to diagram with you but all rattlesnakes have hemolytic venom - there are none with neurotoxin venom. TD
 

Rick Courtright

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 10, 2002
Messages
7,897
Location
Redlands CA USA
Hi,

Agree with the others you're probably out of Mojave green territory, Don. But, in spring when it's nice and green around here for just a few weeks, I have seen some of our Southern Pacific rattlers turn rather green to match their environment. Have also heard of "pink" ones, and actually seen one, in certain dry watercourse environments where the rocks and sand appear pinkish in the morning and late afternoon.

As for the type of venom rattlesnakes have, yes, there ARE neurotoxic components in some species' venom. This link is from Loma Linda University School of Medicine about this subject. LLUMC has one of Southern California's leading experts on rattlesnakes on staff:

http://www.llu.edu/medicine/ebs/hayes/research-c-venom.page

And this link is posted on the website of a gold mining organization a friend belongs to. They work several claims right in the middle of rattlesnake territory quite regularly:

http://garnetbird.hubpages.com/hub/Deadly-New-Rattlesnake-Venom-Strain-Found-In-Southern-California

Rick C
 

Don Lovel

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Red Dirt Oklahoma, Go Cowboys
huntsman22 said:
Prairie rattlers are kinda like chameleons. They gradually take on the color of their habitat. Here, the ones caught in the rimrock are brown, the ones in the wheat stubble are yellow-ish, ones in the sage are light green, and the ones in the riparian areas are a brighter green. There are no Mohaves here, no matter what anyone says.......

You sir, I believe on the subject, and thought that at first, but when I saw how close the google pic of a Mohave was, wow, but then if there is as was earlier stated a scale and eye distance difference in the species, I aint wanting to get that close to look, but have handled rattlers several times in my life big timber rattlers in Arkansas, canebreak and prairie and decent sized diamondbacks in western Oklahoma

A good friend lives in Ajo, she has seen several Mohave and recently she caught a really pretty foot long sidewinder and released him.
I don't like killing them if at all possible but, they are the other white meat in my kitchen and if the grandkids got to be around the place, they cant stay.
 

Don Lovel

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gramps said:
8100 feet elevation is a bit high too for any snake. Wonder if he hitched a ride on a vehicle.
gramps
apparently not Gramps, surprised the hell out of me too, and if it was a prairie rattler doing chameleon he was in green sage and grass the land owner had killed another green one a couple days before


To Molly, who had never seen one up close, not funny to be 3 ft from one and not see or hear it and it was buzzing good, I missed it and actually saw it before I heard it buzzing in the grass
 

graygun

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Sep 24, 2008
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Junction,Tx
I was working in some grass and brush two days ago with a chain saw and was expecting to see a snake but did not. This was at a place where I'd seen two rattlers previously.

Close call for you folks
 

Enigma

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Joined
Apr 17, 2002
Messages
2,148
Location
Houston metro area, TX
wolfsong said:
I absolutely HATE rattlesnakes of any size, color, variety and location.







Except dead ones.

That pretty well sums it up for me, too. There are supposedly thirteen (13) different species of rattlesnake in Arizona, and six (6) of them in Yuma County. I do know that Sidewinders are thick as they can stick around here - we killed one in the front yard last fall, and I've seen (and killed) several immature ones around the area.

The tree-huggers keep telling us that 'we're in their environment,' and such crap. I didn't ask to be here, the Army decided they wanted me here. I feel no remorse whatsoever about killing them - especially when they're around people. If I'm hiking or hunting out in the desert and see one, it'll get a pass from me. Not in the housing area, though.
 

wolfsong

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The world, in its entirety, is OUR habitat. WE are natural, we are of this earth. WE are the top of the natural food chain. ANYWHERE we choose to live is our habitat.

Where did we live before we built our homes, towns, cities?

Tree hugging environmentalists have NO clue as to the natural order of life.
 
Joined
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Woodbury, Tn
wolfsong said:
The world, in its entirety, is OUR habitat. WE are natural, we are of this earth. WE are the top of the natural food chain. ANYWHERE we choose to live is our habitat.

Where did we live before we built our homes, towns, cities?

Tree hugging environmentalists have NO clue as to the natural order of life.
Touché
gramps
 

stevemb

Hunter
Joined
Aug 8, 2012
Messages
2,769
Am glad Don n wife evaded a bad situation, regardless of species or types of toxins. just because somebody did field research and wrote a paper on range or elevation limitations doesn't mean the snake read it. I've seen a number of species, furred,finned or scaled that went where they wanted while experts denied the possibility.
 

Don Lovel

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Location
Red Dirt Oklahoma, Go Cowboys
TinkerDave said:
Don Lovel said:
Molly and I were looking at a farm for sale over NE of La Veta pass north of Hwy 160, 8100 ft, land owner heard it first, it was about 3 ft from Molly, and it probably took her 45 seconds to see it, she did not panic, and I got her moved away and then dealt with the snake. But she was visibly shaken by the encounter.
Brightest green rattler I had ever seen, I wondered if Mohave, but I thought all we had were western Diamondback and Prairie rattlers, I looked on Google images when I got home, the pattern on prairie rattlers and Mohave Greens are similar, but no mistaking the bright green tint.
Dangerous as hell if one bites as they are neuro toxic and aggressive strikers when you stumble on one.
We don't have any rattlesnakes that I know of around Crestone, too high, too cold, alkali in the SLV supposedly deters them. I have looked while prospecting, never found one, lots of diamondbacks and prairie rattlers in Saguache side of SLV but none on east slope of high Sangre.
Needless to say, even though I have been warning her that sooner or later out here she will see one, that one was a scary encounter, too close with a very dangerous one. Sorry I did not have camera, was going to shoot it with SR1911, but really at first I tried to get it to just move away from where we were but it kept coming back at us so I shoveled it. Got the buttons for my hatband but the hide got shoveled.
I am sorry to diagram with you but all rattlesnakes have hemolytic venom - there are none with neurotoxin venom. TD
Sorry but you are incorrect on this, Central American Cascabels, Mohaves do for sure, Massagua venom is very complex as is Eastern Diamondback, I just read up on all this last nihgt. Typically snake venoms are among the most complicated chemical compounds that can have far ranging effect and potency per the typical diet of the various indigenous snakes
 

Don Lovel

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Messages
2,269
Location
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TinkerDave said:
Don Lovel said:
Molly and I were looking at a farm for sale over NE of La Veta pass north of Hwy 160, 8100 ft, land owner heard it first, it was about 3 ft from Molly, and it probably took her 45 seconds to see it, she did not panic, and I got her moved away and then dealt with the snake. But she was visibly shaken by the encounter.
Brightest green rattler I had ever seen, I wondered if Mohave, but I thought all we had were western Diamondback and Prairie rattlers, I looked on Google images when I got home, the pattern on prairie rattlers and Mohave Greens are similar, but no mistaking the bright green tint.
Dangerous as hell if one bites as they are neuro toxic and aggressive strikers when you stumble on one.
We don't have any rattlesnakes that I know of around Crestone, too high, too cold, alkali in the SLV supposedly deters them. I have looked while prospecting, never found one, lots of diamondbacks and prairie rattlers in Saguache side of SLV but none on east slope of high Sangre.
Needless to say, even though I have been warning her that sooner or later out here she will see one, that one was a scary encounter, too close with a very dangerous one. Sorry I did not have camera, was going to shoot it with SR1911, but really at first I tried to get it to just move away from where we were but it kept coming back at us so I shoveled it. Got the buttons for my hatband but the hide got shoveled.
I am sorry to diagram with you but all rattlesnakes have hemolytic venom - there are none with neurotoxin venom. TD
Sorry but you are incorrect on this, Central American Cascabels, Mohaves do for sure, Massagua venom is very complex as is Eastern Diamondback, I just read up on all this last nihgt. Typically snake venoms are among the most complicated chemical compounds that can have far ranging effect and potency per the typical diet of the various indigenous snakes
 

BearBio

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Joined
Oct 22, 2009
Messages
1,826
Location
Eastern Washington
Don Lovel said:
TinkerDave said:
Don Lovel said:
Molly and I were looking at a farm for sale over NE of La Veta pass north of Hwy 160, 8100 ft, land owner heard it first, it was about 3 ft from Molly, and it probably took her 45 seconds to see it, she did not panic, and I got her moved away and then dealt with the snake. But she was visibly shaken by the encounter.
Brightest green rattler I had ever seen, I wondered if Mohave, but I thought all we had were western Diamondback and Prairie rattlers, I looked on Google images when I got home, the pattern on prairie rattlers and Mohave Greens are similar, but no mistaking the bright green tint.
Dangerous as hell if one bites as they are neuro toxic and aggressive strikers when you stumble on one.
We don't have any rattlesnakes that I know of around Crestone, too high, too cold, alkali in the SLV supposedly deters them. I have looked while prospecting, never found one, lots of diamondbacks and prairie rattlers in Saguache side of SLV but none on east slope of high Sangre.
Needless to say, even though I have been warning her that sooner or later out here she will see one, that one was a scary encounter, too close with a very dangerous one. Sorry I did not have camera, was going to shoot it with SR1911, but really at first I tried to get it to just move away from where we were but it kept coming back at us so I shoveled it. Got the buttons for my hatband but the hide got shoveled.
I am sorry to diagram with you but all rattlesnakes have hemolytic venom - there are none with neurotoxin venom. TD
Sorry but you are incorrect on this, Central American Cascabels, Mohaves do for sure, Massagua venom is very complex as is Eastern Diamondback, I just read up on all this last nihgt. Typically snake venoms are among the most complicated chemical compounds that can have far ranging effect and potency per the typical diet of the various indigenous snakes

Recently, some populations of So. Pacific Rattlers were identified as having a significantly neurotoxic factor. I wrote a paper for our Quail Unlimited newsletter on snake venoms (it was reproduced in the L.A. Times) while I was in grad school and taking Herpetology. At that time rattlesnake venoms shared 238 toxins.
 

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