Primer question...

Help Support Ruger Forum:

HumphreyDaBear

Bearcat
Joined
Jun 9, 2024
Messages
29
Location
Hoosierville
I know the "read credible lost data" rule is there for a reason, but... I've looked on powder manufacturers sites and referenced my Lee loader manual on this question. However, I still have a question on proper size for primers, and could use recommendations from experienced loaders.

I have experience loading .38 Spcls., .357 magnums and 45ACP's. But I've recently acquired dies for .44 magnums. I also have numerous powders for different loads, as well as numerous types of primers. So I am not new to loading, but...

On the load dart charts I've noticed the primer call out for .44 magnum Is large pistol primers. However, my primary powders will be H110 & Enforcer. Will large pistol primers be sufficient for both of these powders(especially H110), or would it be more prudent to use large pistol magnum primers. And is there a specific burn rate that would dictate which primer to use for the different powders. I believe the load data said True Blue is also a viable powder but will need to review the charts for verification. If there is a formula for burn rate/primer type that would be nice to know,

Thank you for your opinion in advance.
 

JAYDAWG

Single-Sixer
Joined
Mar 17, 2024
Messages
259
Location
Olympic Peninsula
Will large pistol primers be sufficient for both of these powders(especially H110), or would it be more prudent to use large pistol magnum primers.

I use standard large pistol primers with H110 for my 44mag loads and they work flawlessly.

A few years back when primers were hard to find, I even used Rifle primers (small & large) in my hand gun loads, BUT only for revolvers. The striker fired semi auto's 9mm's didn't always ignite the thicker Rifle primers.......revolvers no problem.

Cheers,
JaydaWg
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
25,945
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
Welcome to the Forum!

I always preach that when reloading,, follow the info in the manuals to closely duplicate their tested reports.

That said,, any deviation from published & tested data,, always start at the beginning loads & work up.

But the burn rates for primers isn't published because they give different results when combined with different powders. Add in the bullet seating depth, the amount of crimp, & other factors,, all sorts of variables pop up!

I have used primers that say; "Large Pistol," "Large Pistol Magnum," and "Winchester Large Pistol" that say they are for both.
So,, yes,, you can use the your primers & start low & work up.

If you have a Chronograph,, that would be a good assistant for real data.
 

GasGuzzler

Hunter
Joined
Oct 22, 2012
Messages
2,920
Location
Cooke County, Texas
Gall Lee ... the advice to follow manuals isn't dumb, the manuals ARE dumb because they all have different advice so don't listen to "follow the manuals". See?

I have no use for the .429 "magnum" but H110 with any published data is fine. Follow the manual.

There is very little difference functionally between magnum and "un-magnum" in pistols but there are examples where one should be used and not the other. Why are you asking here? Follow the manual LOL.
 
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
10,322
Location
missouri
"If you have a Chronograph,, that would be a good assistant for real data."
^^^THIS^^^
I found that a chronograph is my most valuable reloading tool after a good powder scale. One can learn many important and valuable things by use of the chronograph.
 

Enigma

Hunter
Joined
Apr 17, 2002
Messages
2,552
Location
Houston metro area, TX
Some slow-burning pistol powders can exhibit ignition problems in low temperatures unless loaded with magnum primers. H-110 is one of those powders. If you live someplace that's always warmer than, say freezing, I wouldn't worry about it. Any place that has an actual winter, with snow, I would opt for magnum primers.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 29, 2017
Messages
1,837
Location
Idaho
I have been reloading rifle, handgun and shotgun ammo since about 1978. I just follow the manual that I am using for that load. I keep enough primers on hand to load what the manual says. I have changed up one brand of primers for another. Example if load called for CCI small rifle, I have substituted Fed small rifle, as others stated. I started over at the min. load and worked up again.
If I had your question, I would contact LEE and ask them WHY and if that would be ok. Bottom line no one on here knows all of the whys that LEE put into their load testing. Just one of the whys is in the last post.
 
Joined
Dec 24, 2009
Messages
590
Location
Flat Rock, NC
I have been reloading rifle, handgun and shotgun ammo since about 1978. I just follow the manual that I am using for that load. I keep enough primers on hand to load what the manual says. I have changed up one brand of primers for another. Example if load called for CCI small rifle, I have substituted Fed small rifle, as others stated. I started over at the min. load and worked up again.
If I had your question, I would contact LEE and ask them WHY and if that would be ok. Bottom line no one on here knows all of the whys that LEE put into their load testing. Just one of the whys is in the last post.
Once upon time 45 years ago I experienced hang fires using CCI LR primers and BLc2 ball powder. With a little research I determined that all Winchester powders were "ball powder" which is notoriously hard to ignite. In order to avoid issues Winchester primers are hotter or burn longer than all other manufacturers primers. I switched to Winchester primers and never looked back, no "hang fires" since. Recently I was given some CCI LR primers and have used them last winter in my M1 with no ill results. Maybe CCI changed the formulation of their priming mixture since Vista Outdoors bought CCI ten or so years ago. I suspect there is some similarity in the primer chemistry. Federal primers have always been considered "hot".
 

HumphreyDaBear

Bearcat
Joined
Jun 9, 2024
Messages
29
Location
Hoosierville
Gall Lee ... the advice to follow manuals isn't dumb, the manuals ARE dumb because they all have different advice so don't listen to "follow the manuals". See?

I have no use for the .429 "magnum" but H110 with any published data is fine. Follow the manual.

There is very little difference functionally between magnum and "un-magnum" in pistols but there are examples where one should be used and not the other. Why are you asking here? Follow the manual LOL.
"un-magnum" never heard of those type of primers.

You stated 'There is very little difference functionally between magnum and "un-magnum" in pistols but there are examples where one should be used and not the other'. It's these 'examples' I'm interested in. The reason I asked in the Factory Ammunition & Reloading forum is that some of the members might have hands on experience with this inquiry, especially in regards to H110 powder in .44 Magnum, and not in an unrelated forum. I don't ask a Plumber about HVAC questions. I have experience with H110 in .357 magnums, but not .44 magnum, others here may. It doesn't mean any information I get here is gospel, rather more data to be reviewed and utilized. I have referenced both my Lee manual and Hodgdon's site and have contacted both companies in regards primarily, to see if there is actually any different powder behavior in extreme temperature differences, that may qualify the use Large Pistol Magnum primers over Large Pistol primers. I'm waiting for their response.

If you ask no questions, you'll gain no knowledge.

"un-magnum"...💡

Have a good day.
 

HumphreyDaBear

Bearcat
Joined
Jun 9, 2024
Messages
29
Location
Hoosierville
"If you have a Chronograph,, that would be a good assistant for real data."
^^^THIS^^^
I found that a chronograph is my most valuable reloading tool after a good powder scale. One can learn many important and valuable things by use of the chronograph.
I have had to borrow a chrono from a friend in the past due to unavailability of them. They're back in stock so I think I'll pick up a Caldwell Ballistic, any opinion on this brand?
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
25,945
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
"I have had to borrow a chrono from a friend in the past due to unavailability of them. They're back in stock so I think I'll pick up a Caldwell Ballistic, any opinion on this brand?"

Just a few weeks ago,, a good friend brought out his Caldwell chrono to my range. It was brand new. We set his up,, and I also put out my new Garmin Xero chrono.

We were testing about 9-10 different loads in his gun. I was doing the shooting,, he was scribbling down the velocities as I'd fire a shot. Near the end of our testing,, his Caldwell just stopped working. We tried a re-set. & a few other easy to try things. Nada.
But my Garmin,, just kept on going. AND,, afterwards,, I downloaded all his info, and printed him a much more detailed info sheet than what he'd written down.

BUY a Garmin.

It may cost more,, but it'll be well worth it. And I also own a Ohler 35P chrono. The Garmin is just so much easier to use & set up.
 

HumphreyDaBear

Bearcat
Joined
Jun 9, 2024
Messages
29
Location
Hoosierville
chui & contender,

Thank you both for the chrono suggestion. Is the Xero C1 Pro W/ Bluetooth the Garmin chrono you're recommending? I just love buying new toys that are educational 🤪👍...

If you what to learn, ya just gotta ask questions, right?

Like I said earlier, when I was looking for Chronos, none were available. Now a better one is...Fate and purpose.

Thank you both again.
 
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
10,322
Location
missouri
I've gone through at least three 'CHRONY' speed-o-meters either due to simple failure of the widget or in one case failure of the shooter. Not 'lab quality' but certainly capable of reading velocity consistently AND easy to use. My current working Chrony has it's own dedicated tripod and sits next to the range bucket of sandbags, toolkit, and ear pro.
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
25,945
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
Check out my thread here in this section on my new Garmin. Yes,, that Garmin Xero C1 Pro is the one. I am what I call "computer stupid" and even I was able to figure out how to work this new fangled chrono. It's actually very easy.

I've paired it with my IPhone,, (you do have to download the app) and it simply works. You then export the data to an email, and then print the results.

Long, long ago,, I scraped up the money to buy the (then) top of the line Ohler 35P. Never regretted it. Spent time a few years later talking with Ken Ohler. Learned a lot. It has never failed me & was considered the best out there. Expensive to make & sell. Along came a few companies with their less expensive chrono's,,, and Ohler experienced a decline in sales. They stopped making them for a while. then due to demands,, they returned to building them. (I recall seeing an ad asking to buy one with a standing offer of $1500.00.)
My Ohler is still top quality. And I plan on doing a side by side comparison soon. The one thing I have truly enjoyed is the SUPER easy set-up of the Garmin. It takes me 20-30 minutes to assemble & align & all my Ohler. the Garmin, turn on, punch a few buttons, set down, and shoot.
 
Top