Picking a "Simple" 22 Semi-Auto

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mljones1947

Bearcat
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
19
Location
Missouri
Before I start ranting, I'm a relatively new (less than a year) gun owner who enjoys shooting at the range but does not want to center my life around gun collecting, maintenance, etc. There is nothing wrong with people who do, but I've gone "over the deep end" with too many things in the past and don't want to do that with guns. I do have other interests. I'm also getting older (62), and my fingers aren't as nimble as the once were.

In a recent thread, Dennis had trouble reassembling his new MKIII. As usual, forum members came to his aid, and everything worked out fine.

In that thread, I raised the question of the Mark series' reputation for being difficult to reassemble after cleaning. The responses were that the difficulty was over-hyped and that you just had to carefully follow the directions, step by step. However, there do seem to be a lot of steps involving relatively small parts in a relatively small space.

Well, I'm a revolver guy thinking about a .22 semi-auto. I'm also a firm believer in the KISS principle, having personally inflicted too much complexity on the world earlier in life. Nothing in the gun world can be simpler than the routine "internal" maintenance on my two Ruger revolvers (a 2005 Single Six and a 1977 Security Six). Seven round, straight, accessible holes to clean, clean the inside of the cylinder frame while it's out, done. One easily accessible pin to remove on the Single Six, none on the Security Six. Nothing to foul up. It's actually enjoyable doing it. I'm looking for something reasonably close to that with a semi-auto.

Now, I doubt that any semi-auto can be that simple. However, rooger's response in the other thread lamented Ruger's lack of .22 semi-auto alternatives to the Mark series, noting how much simpler his P series pistol was to maintain.

I appreciate the Ruger reputation for reliability, strength, etc., which is why I have the revolvers. I know that this forum is focused on Rugers, but looking at it objectively, are there any reliable non-Ruger .22 semi-autos I should be looking at for the "joy" of going to the range while keeping the associated maintenance simple?

(Boy, I can hear the "I never clean my gun" guys now. Save your fingers. I'm going to clean mine.)

Thanks in advance.
 

Dennis

Single-Sixer
Joined
Nov 9, 2009
Messages
117
Location
Dakotas/Minnesota
I am also new to gun ownership but understand that S&W makes a pretty good 10-shot .22lr revolver, but at a pretty high price too I understand.

Regarding a non-Ruger semi-auto .22lr - heck, I barley know about the Ruger one so I'll have to pass that torch to our more experience bretheren on this site. :)

Cheers,
Dennis
 

Old Judge Creek

Single-Sixer
Joined
Nov 1, 2001
Messages
320
Location
1881 Ranch, Nv & Northern Ca
I was lucky. I managed to get a Mk II 22/45 some time ago. I bought it to throw in the ATV kit for a survival pistol when I prospect in the desert.

ForagePistol.jpg


It's everything I'd hoped it would be.

That said, one other comes to mind: the Browning Buckmark. Several acquaintances of mine have them and get excellent performance from them.

The true gems of this genre are sadly no longer in production.

And the fact is, I much prefer my 6 1/2" Single Six to my 22/45. It's not as accurate (but good enough to pop a bunny in the head from ~100 feet or so) and its more versatile. And my Bearcat will do the same at 75 feet.
 

captainkirk

Blackhawk
Joined
Jul 30, 2002
Messages
538
Location
Abilene, TX
mljones1947":3u22tjnb said:
In that thread, I raised the question of the Mark series' reputation for being difficult to reassemble after cleaning. The responses were that the difficulty was over-hyped and that you just had to carefully follow the directions, step by step. However, there do seem to be a lot of steps involving relatively small parts in a relatively small space.

It is not really that hard. Once you get a feel for it, it is no problem. I have a bull barrel MK1 and a 6 7/8 MK2 Target and love them both. I am partial to these earlier incarnations of the MK series, though some folks really like the MK3. There are plenty of used examples out there at decent prices, just handle a few and I think you will find one you like. One day I'll add a 4 1/4 standard...

captainkirk
 

COR

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Aug 7, 2007
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850
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Pittsburgh, Pa
Whether you want to hear it or not...You do not ever have to take any MKI, MKII, or MKIII apart that far for routine cleaning. You really don't even have to clean them past pulling a bore snake through the tube and wiping them down with an oily rag. They are very accurate guns that need very little maintenance...I prefer the MKII...that will last a lifetime with just the general maintenance I described. Mine is 20 or so years old and very accurate.

You aren't doing yourself any favors by tearing that gun apart at every cleaning, it just isn't necessary. You said you were doing it anyway so have fun putting those tricky bastards back together. For a person that has only been a gun owner for a year or so, you sure are stuck in your ways. More guns are damaged by excessive cleaning than actual shooting. Don't trust me though, I've only been at it for a few decades.
 

Quarterbore

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 9, 2008
Messages
904
Location
Valley Forge PA
I have a little Walther P22 and I really like that little pistol. Easy to clean and very accurate for a cheap gun too. The only downside is they are not known to be the most robust gun out there and there have been pics of them where the slide has split but then again I can show you photos of Redhawks kabooming or barrels falling off too so what is in a photo?

I like the Walther P22, it is easy to clean, cheap, and very accurate.

Now, I also have an Advantage Arms conversion kit for the Glock 19. That is also very easy to clean but very expensive if you don't already have the Glock! The conversion kit will cost you as much as a Walter P22!
 
Joined
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NOTHING wrong with the markII, and in fact like the 22/45 pictured above a fine gun and has ALL the good features that I like in a .22 semi auto...Ruger had to go and "lawyer" up the MK IIIs and the ONLY good feature I care for is they moved the magazine release up to the left side of the gun grips where it belongs, NOT on the bottom, ala the european style release of LONG ago........
in my opinion, the "best" all around version Ruger made was the MK II 22/45, with the stainless upper in a 5 1/4 inch barrel...best of ALL the worlds...and no, you really never have to take one apart, and yes, I know a few guys who NEVER have taken theirs apart ans they work just fine...can do all the cleaning with the gun together, unloaded and the magazine removed...its NOT 'rocket science'.........
bottom line , I can add the Mark III to my' list of Rugers' that I would NOT go out of my way to ever buy.....and I AM the Rugerguy....... :roll:
 

Piper

Bearcat
Joined
May 25, 2005
Messages
14
Location
North Tx
+ 1 to what COR said

I've had a MK 1 Bull Barrel for over 30 years. Have no idea how many rounds through that thing but it's well up there. I've cleaned it pretty good from time to time but never had it apart. Never felt compelled to do that.

Piper
 

mljones1947

Bearcat
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
19
Location
Missouri
COR":7df71ezq said:
Whether you want to hear it or not...You do not ever have to take any MKI, MKII, or MKIII apart that far for routine cleaning. You really don't even have to clean them past pulling a bore snake through the tube and wiping them down with an oily rag. They are very accurate guns that need very little maintenance...I prefer the MKII...that will last a lifetime with just the general maintenance I described. Mine is 20 or so years old and very accurate.

You aren't doing yourself any favors by tearing that gun apart at every cleaning, it just isn't necessary. You said you were doing it anyway so have fun putting those tricky bastards back together. For a person that has only been a gun owner for a year or so, you sure are stuck in your ways. More guns are damaged by excessive cleaning than actual shooting. Don't trust me though, I've only been at it for a few decades.

Okay, I'll try to stay cool here.

I've never "torn a gun apart" to clean it, since I've only cleaned the two revolvers that I mentioned in the method described in my original post. Removing the cylinder from a Single Six is hardly tearing it apart.

The original poster in the other thread I mentioned felt the need to partially disassemble his new gun, either to look for leftover manufacturing gunk or some other reason, and had trouble getting it back together.

If you, with your decades of experience, say that there is no need to have to field strip a Mark model for routine cleaning, then fine. It's too bad that Ruger's manuals for the guns give a totally different impression to someone considering getting one of the guns. (Check out page 25 in the MKII manual or page 28 in the MKIII manual.) Hey, maybe the original poster in the other thread was "dumb" enough to read the manual that came with his gun?

As to being set in my ways, I don't apologize for feeling that guns need routine cleaning. What that involves or how often that needs to be done obviously varies by the model of the gun and the conditions under which it is used.
 
Joined
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Messages
8,898
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As said above, with the advent of all the GOOD cleaners, blasters, and solvents out there, it isn't needed to take it all apart.....in fact years ago we used to have a "ultrasonic" cleaner from 'LPS' it warmed the 'LPS cleaning solvent, as well as vibrated and it would clean all the guns we could put in there, and in little or no time would come out "spotless" inside and out...heck ,we used the same principle ( concept) in cleaning our dies at work, at GE...same thing,,,,so it's nothing new.....mostly common sense and I can relate to some "old guys" who still to this day use good old 'kerosene' and soak their guns and brush them out and again,,,,,spotless......swab & lightly oil............as often said, more harm and damage is done from OVERCLEANING....this is very true.....as well as the constant removing this part or that part and eventually things "loosen up" and eventually you will slip, booger a screw or two, or cause scratches here and there......why temp the gun gods...Uncle Murphy was an 'optimist'............ :wink:
 
Joined
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Dallas, TX
mljones1947:
I have a Mark II. It was about 5 yearsl years of high volume shooting before I thought about taking it apart to clean. My cleaning had only consisted of using a bore brush and toothbrush to clean the open bolt chamber area. Get one in Stainless steel and there is even less to worry about.

I agree with COR. Most guns are ruined by excessive cleaning.

I also own a Buckmark, they have tiny screws which require tools to take apart to clean, which needs to be done more often than the Ruger (the act of taking the pistol apart that is.)
 

Snake45

Hawkeye
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COR":w4hyf7pq said:
Whether you want to hear it or not...You do not ever have to take any MKI, MKII, or MKIII apart that far for routine cleaning. You really don't even have to clean them past pulling a bore snake through the tube and wiping them down with an oily rag. They are very accurate guns that need very little maintenance...I prefer the MKII...that will last a lifetime with just the general maintenance I described. Mine is 20 or so years old and very accurate.

You aren't doing yourself any favors by tearing that gun apart at every cleaning, it just isn't necessary. You said you were doing it anyway so have fun putting those tricky bastards back together. For a person that has only been a gun owner for a year or so, you sure are stuck in your ways. More guns are damaged by excessive cleaning than actual shooting. Don't trust me though, I've only been at it for a few decades.
Quoted for truth. Listen to what this man says! (I've only been at it "a few decades" too--about four of them.)
 

Richbaker

Blackhawk
Joined
Jan 23, 2007
Messages
639
Location
Tucson, AZ
COR":3geh5s1v said:
Whether you want to hear it or not...You do not ever have to take any MKI, MKII, or MKIII apart that far for routine cleaning. You really don't even have to clean them past pulling a bore snake through the tube and wiping them down with an oily rag. They are very accurate guns that need very little maintenance...I prefer the MKII...that will last a lifetime with just the general maintenance I described. Mine is 20 or so years old and very accurate.

You aren't doing yourself any favors by tearing that gun apart at every cleaning, it just isn't necessary. You said you were doing it anyway so have fun putting those tricky bastards back together. For a person that has only been a gun owner for a year or so, you sure are stuck in your ways. More guns are damaged by excessive cleaning than actual shooting. Don't trust me though, I've only been at it for a few decades.

This right here! The more often you take a gun apart, the faster those parts are going to "loosen" up, as well.
A new gun should be taken apart to clean the shipping/storage preservative grease off and a good oil/grease applied for shooting, then only occasionally after that.
 
A

Anonymous

rugerguy":s6tm7rd4 said:
bottom line , I can add the Mark III to my' list of Rugers' that I would NOT go out of my way to ever buy.....and I AM the Rugerguy....... :roll:

Interesting... I'm quite fond of my Mark III. She holds her own quite easily with my buddy's Mark II, and I can remove the "Lawyer up" features if I want.
22_45Target.jpg


Lots of Military and Police units actually like the magazine safety disconnect. Get in a scuffle, and a BG gets his hands on yer piece you can drop the mag and render it useless.

To each their own I say ... diversity is what makes the good ol' US of A so great.
 

Cholo

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I bought a Mark ll Competition and stripped it down per instructions and gave it a good cleaning and a light oiling. That night I did it again, and again and again till I could do it without looking at the instructions. I thought that now I have the trick to doing it, I'll never need the manual again.

I was right! ...because I never took the damn thing apart again. It just wasn't worth it nor needed. That one little widgit was the fly in the ointment every time. At least I know I can do it, and that I don't want to do it again. Oh, maybe in the next 20k rounds or so; but I think I forgot how to do it without the manual by now :wink:
 

rooger

Single-Sixer
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Auburn, CA
mljones, what works for me is I use two different cleaning protocols for my MK III. The quick method is what I use after every range trip. (I shoot 400-500 rounds of bulk .22 so I always have a fair amount of grime to clean away.) I remove the bolt and clean it and the barrel. This only takes a few minutes. About every fifth time, I also remove the barrel-receiver from the grip frame so I can clean further. The complexities of the MK III are nothing compared to the fun I have shooting it. The P95 is easy to clean but, for me, it's not as fun to shoot.
 

tplace

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 22, 2009
Messages
7
Location
Greencastle, PA
Cholo":lbvibq71 said:
I bought a Mark ll Competition and stripped it down per instructions and gave it a good cleaning and a light oiling. That night I did it again, and again and again till I could do it without looking at the instructions. I thought that now I have the trick to doing it, I'll never need the manual again.

I was right! ...because I never took the damn thing apart again. It just wasn't worth it nor needed. That one little widgit was the fly in the ointment every time. At least I know I can do it, and that I don't want to do it again. Oh, maybe in the next 20k rounds or so; but I think I forgot how to do it without the manual by now :wink:

I hate to admit this but I have a MK I that I bought in 1983 with some of my re-enlistment bonus; until I joined this forum, this week, I never knew how to remove the barrel from the frame. Well, I pulled it apart last night to see what it looked like after 26 years of just bore maintenance and brushing where I could reach. I was surprised to find no rust, just a build-up of crud, I put the parts in an ultrasonic cleaner filled with Kerosene for 30 minutes and everything looked like new. I probably won't wait 26 years to do that again but it will be a while, frame to barrel fit was TIGHT I want to keep it that way.
 
A

Anonymous

Check out the S&W 22a. I have had mine for about 6 trouble free years. Shoot great and super simple to take down for cleaning. I can have this semi broke down and put back together in about a minute or less.
 

george preston

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Messages
241
Location
Jacksonville, Florida
I'm partial to the Ruger MK II pistol but there are others out there that are also good. The Browning Buck Mark and the old Colt woodsman come to mind. As far as being complicated to take apart goes…..remember that you are talking about a machine and all machines have some level of complexity to them. Generally, the more moving parts, the more complicated. That being said, the MK II pistols are not that complicated. Just my $.02
 
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