O ring to help accuracy.

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langenc

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 22, 2007
Messages
471
Location
Lewiston, MI USA
The rubber O ring idea
came from old Elmer Keith way back when actually, its also been
used on the angled forend screw on the M77, successfully.

Tried that today. Torqued as tight as I could. Couldnt get the floorplate to close. Too much rubber under the screwhead and it now the floorplate sticks up too high. Took the O ring out and reassembled. Oh well-tried.
 

6mmsl

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 8, 2009
Messages
153
Location
Utah
I use the rubber O-ring on the middle screw of the M77 MKII so I can hand tighten it just snug and the O-ring does not allow it to back out.

I have heard that if you tighten the center mount screw to tight it could affect accuracy. An old gunsmith taught me his personal touch to tighting/torquing sequence years ago and O-ring thing was part of it.

Done it ever since with great success.


Good shooting-Steve
 

mr surveyor

Blackhawk
Joined
Apr 4, 2008
Messages
622
Location
Texas
Thanks for the "O" ring tip. I recently bought a nice like new M77MKII that was all over the paper until I read on here about tightening the action screws. I too found that when I tightened the front trigger guard screw to any extent, I could not latch the floor plate. I scrfatched my head all weekend thinking all sorts of (mostly really dumb) solutions until I finally realized a small shim of plastic (from a coffee can lid) under the trigger guard solved the problem perfectly. But, the "O" ring sounds like the perfect solution, and most likely much more reliable as to staying in place! And, for what it's worth, tuning by tightening the screws changed my 2-3 inch 100 yard groups to consistant quarter size groups (chambered in .243).

I think I'll try the "O" ring trick this weekend :D


surv
 

roofinspector

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
Messages
282
I too remember reading Elmer's mention about using an o-ring on a No.1 way back when. Seems like it was in perhaps a Gunworld? on the left hand side and a picture of a No.1H 375? about halfway down on the right side of the page. Have to admit, it has been a while on that.................I suspect my copy is long lost in the bookcases somewhere or I would reread it again just for the memory of his literary works.

When I read that piece, I interpreted that the o-ring went between the hanger and the forend wood(inside wood surface) on a No.1, and provided a vibration type buffer as well as float the barrel. I tried it on an early 220 swift No.1V and it helped the groups considerably.

I would have thought that the o-ring would have been between the recoil area and wood on the 77 with the screw drawing the wood to the o-ring/recoil lug on the inside of the stock.

I will have to go back and find my copy, and try to reread, perhaps I missed the point there. Always something new to revisit/relearn.
 

El Numero Uno

Buckeye
Joined
Feb 21, 2006
Messages
1,017
Location
Pidcoke, Texas, USA
The Keith article was in the September, 1971 of Guns & Ammo and was reprinted in the 2005 Guide to Ruger Firearms. The washer was put on the screw and then put thru the forearm threads of the No.1. He mentions using this on his .375 and .458 No.1s.
 

roofinspector

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
Messages
282
Many thanks for the magazine reference. I could remember the page and picture but could not remember the magazine. I have been looking for that in my archives, but no luck so far.

guess had one of those senior moments trying to find that article; so had to ask the wife for help in finding it.

Just found it(right, she did) and it talks about a washer on the forearm screw. Since they were talking about forearm tip pressure on the barrel, probably the washer would be placed outside of the forearm proper. Did not appear too clear to me which side the washer really went on, but one could infer the washer outside the forearm.

When I worked with my old Swift, I put the o-ring inside the forearm and thought I was doing good, it shot more consistently but really was just a fairly honest 3/4" rifle. Guess the inside the forearm o-ring routine applied some dampening, and floated the forearm tip.

A most interesting thread to me, I will have to drag out the old gun, and put the washer on the outside, play with tip pressures, and see what happens just out of curosity.

Like most, I always enjoyed Elmer's articles; he was pretty articulate in his writing.
 
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