No. 1 Trigger Adjustment

Help Support Ruger Forum:

markn30135

Single-Sixer
Joined
Oct 27, 2008
Messages
195
Hello,

I am wondering how one can adjust a trigger on the No.1's? Does anyone know when the adjustable triggers went away from Ruger? How does one know if they have an adjustable trigger to start with? And last but not least, who makes a good replacement trigger for those that are not adjustable? Thank you!

Mark :D
 

Firsttimegrampa

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 22, 2004
Messages
274
OK, first which number one do you have? Second look at you trigger and see if it has an allen screw inbedded. That's a hint..There will be other's that will tell you more as soon as we know which Ruger #1's you have..
 

SAJohn

Hunter
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Messages
2,300
Well I'll be a monkey's uncle, I bought my orange butt No. 1 brand new in 1975. I have hunted and bench fired it for almost 35 years now. I have even completely disassembled it and never noticed that the trigger had two allen head screws.

Thanks FTG, I now have something new to play with; however, it came from the factory with a 3 lb 8 oz pull with zero detectable creep. By far the best rifle factory trigger I have ever tried.

John
 

RJ556

Buckeye
Joined
Nov 28, 2009
Messages
1,070
It appears one of the screws is for weight of pull. Is the other screw for overtravel?
 

gewehrfreund

Buckeye
Joined
Apr 7, 2006
Messages
1,132
Ruger stopped putting the three screw triggers in Number Ones around 1977 or 78. Up to that time you could adjust sear engagement, but you had to remove the buttstock to do it. Since that time up to now all the triggers have had only the two outwardly visible screws - return spring tension and overtravel.
There are a lot of different opinions on the adjustability/tunability of the two screw tirggers, or lack thereof. A knowledgeable person can certainly smooth these up and lighten the pull to some extent, but they will never approach a three screw trigger (my opinion based on 30+ Number Ones over the last 30+ years). The three screw copies of the Ruger (mainly Moyers, but there are others) can be just as good with a little work. The set triggers like the Canjar and newer Kepplinger are great, but hard to find and/or expensive, and you have to like set triggers.
One of my solutions to the trigger "problem" has been to insert and epoxy/steel bond a piece of 1/4" key stock into the two screw trigger at the point where the original triggers had the third screw. Then I D&T this piece for the sear adjustment screw. This has worked well for me, and seems to be every bit as good as a true three screw trigger.
 
Top