Newb question about trigger

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johnbh

Bearcat
Joined
Sep 2, 2009
Messages
63
I'm new to shooting. I was at the range,and was talking to the person who
runs the range. He told me the only thing he would change was the trigger.
Go to a person who knows ruger and have a combat trigger done. Not competion trigger. He let me pull one back w/ this trigger . You pull back
u hit a plateau and u can hold,then u can finish the pull. Felt really good.
Some one else came in he had the same set up,and i tried his felt nice no build up. He was telling me Ruger was was doing this 50 yrs ago.
I have been dry firing the hell out of the gun. My problem w/ the stock i when pulling would get a build up of pressure affecting the shot. Should i have this combat trigger done. Don't mean to ramble on, need some input.
thanks I have gp 100 4',love the gun.
 

c.r.

Single-Sixer
Joined
Apr 23, 2008
Messages
436
Location
Texas
John,
Welcome to the forum

It's very common for some folks to use a word/phrase to describe one thing, and another person to use a completely different word/phrase to describe the exact same thing.

I'm not familiar with a "combat trigger" or a "competition trigger". I would think they are both references to having a nice trigger/action job done on a revolver........With the exception of the "combat trigger" having a heavier trigger pull. just for example meaning the "combat trigger" needs 4lbs of trigger pull, where the "competition trigger" would require 2 1/2 pounds. Basically meaning you don't want a "hair trigger" in a stressful situation.

Since there are at least 2 folks at the range with these "combat triggers", maybe you could ask them if you could shoot their guns, see if you like the triggert, find out who did the trigger jobs and get them to do the same thing to yours.

I also think you will hear a few folks refer to the "build up of pressure" as "stack". Just another example of you say tuhmaytoe, i say tuhmawtoe.

there are some very knowledgeable folks on here who will probably chime in and give you some info that actually makes sense.

~c.r.
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
21,217
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
Welcome to the Forum.
Most firearms can benefit from a proper & correctly done trigger job by a good gunsmith. Most factory triggers are not as good as they can be. I'd suggest a good trigger job,, NOT TOO LIGHT but more importantly smooth, clean & crisp.
 

mt

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 22, 2008
Messages
290
Location
Rocksprings, Texas
What you describe sounds like what is referred to as "stageing" the trigger.

When shooting fast, you yank the trigger back until just before it "breaks". The cylinder continues to rotate until the bolt locks into the lug, then you squeeze the last bit on the trigger to make the hammer fall. It takes a lot of practice to do this consistently and it's hard on the revolver. It's like shooting single action without manually cocking the hammer. I don't recommend this when shooting slow deliberate shots as the cylinder may not lock up in time on some revolvers. Or anyway that's my story and I've got cylinders with razor sharp edges pinged on the lugs to prove it. :D

mt
 

johnbh

Bearcat
Joined
Sep 2, 2009
Messages
63
I'm probaly getting ahead of myself,when stated pressure buld up, i've
heard of stacking thats what happening. The trigger as it is is affecting my shot making me jerk. I guess i want a smooth trigger, being able shoot any kind of ammo not affecting the primer. The gun new, and just going need to go thru the break in period. Then I'll take it from there. Thanks for the responses.
 

johnbh

Bearcat
Joined
Sep 2, 2009
Messages
63
I dried fire my Ruger probaly over 2000 times. I found a local gunsmith,to
[email protected] the gun, and ck out the trigger. The pull @ 10lbs and he said it felt smooth. The single action felt good as well except a little creep. he was telling me the guns from the factory are 12 to 14 lbs. He told me he could take it down to 8.5. I probaly would'nt really feel the diffrence,basically don't waste my money. I thank him for his honestly.
Thanks for the responses. Now I can get off that subject.
 

Jimbo357mag

Hawkeye
Joined
Feb 22, 2007
Messages
10,137
Location
So. Florida
mt":28n6sqi8 said:
What you describe sounds like what is referred to as "stageing" the trigger.

When shooting fast, you yank the trigger back until just before it "breaks". The cylinder continues to rotate until the bolt locks into the lug, then you squeeze the last bit on the trigger to make the hammer fall. It takes a lot of practice to do this consistently and it's hard on the revolver. It's like shooting single action without manually cocking the hammer. I don't recommend this when shooting slow deliberate shots as the cylinder may not lock up in time on some revolvers. Or anyway that's my story and I've got cylinders with razor sharp edges pinged on the lugs to prove it. :D

mt

I don't think I agree with this. Staging a double action trigger should be easy on the cylinder because the cylinder is moving slowly and lock-up should occur every time or else the gun is out of time. You can get peening of the slots from rapidly squeezing the trigger in double action or cocking the single-action too fast. I would suspect probably too much rapid dry-fire would cause peening of the slots and wear on the latch and frame. :D

...Jimbo
 

johnbh

Bearcat
Joined
Sep 2, 2009
Messages
63
My trigger feels real crisp , I'm happy w/my Gp 100. I guess what happens
u here things that might make it better, and u run w/it. The 2 guns I pulled the trigger were both SW. The trigger action was lighter u hit a plateau @ the top then u could pull through. I used the word combat I really don't know all terms yet. I wanted to have a little lighter DA and be able shoot any kind of ammo without any misfires. I had a gunsmith look
at the gun he said I really don't need to anything w/ the trigger. I'm shooting better. I have know idea what peening means. I'm done dry firing the gun. Since I'm here I do have 1 question I have a time being able to see the front sight my eyes suck this happen w/ age. Does anyone what would be a good front sight. I do appreciate the responses it helps alot. I shot archery for about 15 yrs,and shooting the pistol new to me and absolutely and shooting.
thanks
john
 

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