New project- “Super” Vaquero- adding pics with new grip panels.

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I sent the grip frame out to Chig's for some nice Desert Ironwood panels. Wow. These things are amazing. Chad does a great job- I can highly recommend him. Here's the pics!
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collectormzornes

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I sent the grip frame out to Chig's for some nice Desert Ironwood panels. Wow. These things are amazing. Chad does a great job- I can highly recommend him. Here's the pics! View attachment 25020View attachment 25021View attachment 25022View attachment 25023
This looks amazing very well done. What did you use to polish the super hammer with? I have the same gun and have the super hammer installed but it is not polished out and it aggravates me. I don't have a bench grinder or polisher so I would have to use a Dremel and some type of polishing compound I assume. Thanks
 
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This looks amazing very well done. What did you use to polish the super hammer with? I have the same gun and have the super hammer installed but it is not polished out and it aggravates me. I don't have a bench grinder or polisher so I would have to use a Dremel and some type of polishing compound I assume. Thanks
I have a bench grinder with a couple different polishing wheels. Green rouge for the best shine. I did a hammer with the Dremel- you could still see the sanding marks from the factory. It was a "junk" hammer I just wanted to get some stains off.
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Knowing how well both a Dremel and a benchtop unit work- I would advise finding a cheap benchtop at a garage sale. An arbor extension makes it so much easier too. And put a rubber mat on the floor in case it grabs the hammer and throws it down. Don't polish the sear surface.

If you need to stick with the Dremel- smooth the surfaces you want to polish with sandpaper all the way to 320-400 grit. 600 is even better. That way the small Dremel wheel doesn't have to remove as much surface roughness to get a nice shine. I used Blue Magic on the one pictured above, but I believe Autosol is a bit more aggressive and might give better results.

Still, nothing beats a benchtop.
 
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collectormzornes

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I have a bench grinder with a couple different polishing wheels. Green rouge for the best shine. I did a hammer with the Dremel- you could still see the sanding marks from the factory. It was a "junk" hammer I just wanted to get some stains off. View attachment 25042

Knowing how well both a Dremel and a benchtop unit work- I would advise finding a cheap benchtop at a garage sale. An arbor extension makes it so much easier too. And put a rubber mat on the floor in case it grabs the hammer and throws it down. Don't polish the sear surface.

If you need to stick with the Dremel- smooth the surfaces you want to polish with sandpaper all the way to 320-400 grit. 600 is even better. That way the small Dremel wheel doesn't have to remove as much surface roughness to get a nice shine. I used Blue Magic on the one pictured above, but I believe Autosol is a bit more aggressive and might give better results.

Still, nothing beats a benchtop.
Thanks for the help I would use a bench top if that was an option but at this time it is not as I currently don't even have a shop so small jobs are all I can do right now. I will give the little Dremel a try and see where it gets me. Thanks again
 
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Thank you! I've always had the "custom" bug since I was a little kid. Couldn't build a model car without a few personal touches. I guess it's in the blood. I'm having a hard time not tricking out the 3 Screw Single Sixes I've purchased recently, but there's something about the age and originality I respect. I may buy one to "make it mine".

I had to work both the grip frame horns and the main frame horns. So now there's no real going back with the original grip frame.
Any Nothing can do normal. A man with tools and skills has few limits.
 
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That's a classic 3 screw. I might practice on a Heritage Arms or 2 then get a newer one to Customize.
Oh, I know. No Heritage for me. I'm even resistant to Wranglers, although I own one (for now).

I really love the feel of the 3 screw action. And- anything I do will be able to be undone. What I'm talking about is maybe an aluminum Super Hunter gripframe with custom grip panels, and a finely tuned action, possibly with a wide trigger.

I already did up a NM Single Six with one of Ronnie Well's brass grip frames, micarta panels, and a black Bisley trigger that I sanded the sides so it matched the black and silver hammer. Came out nicely.

I was considering just getting a Super Wrangler and working it over, but I just couldn't bring myself to do it. Especially when the 63 was about the same price- just a little over $300.

I didn't understand the draw of a 3 Screw until I spent some time with them. I doubt I'll buy another new model again.
 
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Johnnu2

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Randy, I have used these Dremel polishing wheels that I bought in bulk at Amazon for 1/100th the price of Dremel equivalent. They come in all the necessary 'strengths' i.e. 220, 320, 600 etc etc. AND, include a permanent shaft. I use them up and throw the whple thing away when done. Hopefully this link will take you to them. There is about 100 wheels of different abrasives for like $21 IIRC.


J.
 
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If this is your first time applying things like a belt sander and such to a firearm you might want to start with something you won't care if you get a few "Learning Experiences" on. I always cringe when I see people "Restomod" a beautiful classic. It's one thing when they start with a rust bucket and create something absolutely awesome.
 
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Randy, I have used these Dremel polishing wheels that I bought in bulk at Amazon for 1/100th the price of Dremel equivalent. They come in all the necessary 'strengths' i.e. 220, 320, 600 etc etc. AND, include a permanent shaft. I use them up and throw the whple thing away when done. Hopefully this link will take you to them. There is about 100 wheels of different abrasives for like $21 IIRC.


J.

I'll have to buy a set of those. I use the high dollar ones from Dremel- they work well but wear out fast.
 
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If this is your first time applying things like a belt sander and such to a firearm you might want to start with something you won't care if you get a few "Learning Experiences" on. I always cringe when I see people "Restomod" a beautiful classic. It's one thing when they start with a rust bucket and create something absolutely awesome.
If this is to me, well, I appreciate the concern but I've been doing this for at least 45 years. Actually, I began building scale models of hot rods and tanks/fighters well before I was 10, and even won several contests. I also had a hot rod and fabrication shop later in life. So detail work and precision is my game. The hardest part is as eyes get older and hands less steady, it becomes more challenging and takes a lot longer to complete a project. You have to slow down to get the same results.

Now if this is advice for someone starting out- I agree. I'd probably recommend staying away from the belt sander until you're confident in your abilities. You can't put back material once you take it off. When fitting a grip frame I hand sand with wet/dry paper on a marble surface. Sneak up on the lines and recheck your progress often. Get a set of sacrificial grip frame screws- they are going to be in and out 20 or so times on a project. The torx head screws that you find on Wranglers make great fitting screws.
 
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Randy,, I'm sincerely glad you didn't take any offense at my post. It was never meant to be offensive,, and yet,, when typing words on a keyboard,, and trying to convey feelings & thoughts,,, well, it can be hard.

As I said,, it's a very nice job on a great gun.

Doing custom work,, even minor stuff is what makes things personal & special. A simple set of grips,, or a full blown custom build. Both are special.

Due to the fun we already have with Ruger nomenclature,, I have no idea what they might call a gun like yours,,,,,,,, except maybe; "Nice job!" :D

When I teach handgunning to people,, I always stress that the gun they choose for serious work or self defense,, should fit THEM! It can be as simple as a set of grips,, to a gun custom made to their specs. But it is THEIR gun and they can enjoy it.
And old Bill,, well, he'd be happy we all buy use & enjoy his guns. No matter if we modify them, or keep them stock,, as long as we buy them from him! :D
I always look at people who don't modify/use things to preserve resale value and say that's like not sleeping with your wife so she's tighter for the next guy!!!
 

contender

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Many items made do not need modification, they are "right" when built. Or, if you do want to change something,, it's often better to change something that can be reversed.

I helped an estate sell some guns that the owner had "modified" many of them. Ever seen a Colt Gold Cup 1911 bring about 1/3rd of it's "original condition" value? I did. Or a German Luger. How about a 1903 Springfield? Same batch of guns,,, a pair of heavily modified M1 .30 Carbine's.

Often,, modifications can destroy the potential value of an already great item.

And yes,, I FULLY agree that a person has the right to do as they wish with their property. But to watch heirs who could use the money see thousands of dollars lost because of how great guns were irreversibly modified, come to tears,, was heartbreaking. I heard; "If this hadn't been ********** (insert a type of modification here,) I would have paid a LOT to own it" enough to know it wasn't an anomaly. Especially when they refused to buy the item BECAUSE of it's current condition.

As for keeping a gun & not using it,, I decided long ago, that if I wanted to enjoy a gun, buy (2) of them. Buy a used, already a shooter grade gun, and one to put up & preserve. Best of both worlds.

But again,, to each his own.
 
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Many items made do not need modification, they are "right" when built. Or, if you do want to change something,, it's often better to change something that can be reversed.

I helped an estate sell some guns that the owner had "modified" many of them. Ever seen a Colt Gold Cup 1911 bring about 1/3rd of it's "original condition" value? I did. Or a German Luger. How about a 1903 Springfield? Same batch of guns,,, a pair of heavily modified M1 .30 Carbine's.

Often,, modifications can destroy the potential value of an already great item.

And yes,, I FULLY agree that a person has the right to do as they wish with their property. But to watch heirs who could use the money see thousands of dollars lost because of how great guns were irreversibly modified, come to tears,, was heartbreaking. I heard; "If this hadn't been ********** (insert a type of modification here,) I would have paid a LOT to own it" enough to know it wasn't an anomaly. Especially when they refused to buy the item BECAUSE of it's current condition.

As for keeping a gun & not using it,, I decided long ago, that if I wanted to enjoy a gun, buy (2) of them. Buy a used, already a shooter grade gun, and one to put up & preserve. Best of both worlds.

But again,, to each his own.
Most Commercial products are made for the AVERAGE consumer. From my XXL hands, 36" inseam etc there aren't many things on the market that actually fit me. My Cars, Motorcycles, Boat and even Guns require accomodations to truly be comfortably operable for me. When something actually fits you can use it almost instinctively. When something doesn't fit it's a continuous struggle to even perform minimally adequately. I also like having truly unique things that I have done myself. When it comes to Single Action Revolvers my pinky dangles like it does on my micro pistols. So like the OP I would need a custom grip frame just to start. On My Guns the sights are adapted for my astigmatism which means they'll shoot low right for normal people. I have unaltered guns for normal people as well.
 
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Joined
Oct 20, 2022
Messages
643
Location
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Many items made do not need modification, they are "right" when built. Or, if you do want to change something,, it's often better to change something that can be reversed.

I helped an estate sell some guns that the owner had "modified" many of them. Ever seen a Colt Gold Cup 1911 bring about 1/3rd of it's "original condition" value? I did. Or a German Luger. How about a 1903 Springfield? Same batch of guns,,, a pair of heavily modified M1 .30 Carbine's.

Often,, modifications can destroy the potential value of an already great item.

And yes,, I FULLY agree that a person has the right to do as they wish with their property. But to watch heirs who could use the money see thousands of dollars lost because of how great guns were irreversibly modified, come to tears,, was heartbreaking. I heard; "If this hadn't been ********** (insert a type of modification here,) I would have paid a LOT to own it" enough to know it wasn't an anomaly. Especially when they refused to buy the item BECAUSE of it's current condition.

As for keeping a gun & not using it,, I decided long ago, that if I wanted to enjoy a gun, buy (2) of them. Buy a used, already a shooter grade gun, and one to put up & preserve. Best of both worlds.

But again,, to each his own.
I have been modifying firearms for many years. Maybe I should say decades. I just can't leave original alone unless it is so gloriously built that the sheer beauty defies the need to customize. But in 99% of the items I customize- I consider my modifications to be "bolt on" - that is they can be undone and returned to stock without any evidence of my work. I consider this to be the beauty of my modifications- custom without the irreversible permanence.

My "tagline" on most forums is "It's not what you buy, it's what you build". And I do believe that. But as I get older , I have gained more appreciation for factory stock as opposed to modified. If I'm going to build a custom on something "vintage", I'll find a less desirable model to work my "magic" on. I've got a Single Six in the works that is getting the same treatment. Polished stainless Super Hunter grip frames Chig's grips. Wide trigger. I'll post pics when it's finished.

And- I tend to agree. Most items are built for the "average". When you're 6'2", 290 lbs, and find XXL gloves to be a bit tight, you're not average. So I build to fit my frame.
 
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Joined
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I have been modifying firearms for many years. Maybe I should say decades. I just can't leave original alone unless it is so gloriously built that the sheer beauty defies the need to customize. But in 99% of the items I customize- I consider my modifications to be "bolt on" - that is they can be undone and returned to stock without any evidence of my work. I consider this to be the beauty of my modifications- custom without the irreversible permanence.

My "tagline" on most forums is "It's not what you buy, it's what you build". And I do believe that. But as I get older , I have gained more appreciation for factory stock as opposed to modified. If I'm going to build a custom on something "vintage", I'll find a less desirable model to work my "magic" on. I've got a Single Six in the works that is getting the same treatment. Polished stainless Super Hunter grip frames Chig's grips. Wide trigger. I'll post pics when it's finished.

And- I tend to agree. Most items are built for the "average". When you're 6'2", 290 lbs, and find XXL gloves to be a bit tight, you're not average. So I build to fit my frame.
The only reason I haven't milled top and bottom rails for my Dan Wesson and given it the whole ceracoat camo treatment is the finish is absolutely epic. It's like a perfect black mirror!!! Absolutely uniform. I swap grips and barrel tubes but that's about it.
 

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