My Dad. Father's Day thoughts....

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Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
6,525
Location
Memphis, TN USA
When I was young, still at home, we attended a large Baptist Church. And when an announcement was made of the death of a member, my Mom went to the visitation, no matter how well she knew the family. The funeral home was located on Union Avenue in Memphis, which at that time was also know as Car Dealers Row. Dad would take Mom for visitation but he would walk around the car lots admiring the newest model cars. Then would get Mom and go home. Once I heard my mother say to Dad, "You won't go to any bodys funeral services, so nobody will come to yours."

When Dad died, the stateroom was filled with so many floral tributes that the room overflowed. And, on the day of the funeral, the funeral director told my Mom, "I've never seen such a line-up of cars (for the procession) for a man who was not a prominent figure in Memphis."

As the mourners passed by Mom to give their last respects, Mom said something like, "I don't understand how such a large crowd gathered for Herschel."

The lady responded, "Why Mrs. Wright! He was just so kind!"

That was my Dad.


Bob Wright
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
6,525
Location
Memphis, TN USA
My Dad was a sheet metal worker, and had the reputation of being a literal artist when working with copper. Recently, a man who is now a sheet metal contractor and knew my Dad way back when, told me my Dad's expertise has yet to be equaled. He still has some things my Dad made at his shop.

My Mom was dead set against my owning guns, and it was only through my Dad's intervention that I was allowed to have them at an early age.

Bob Wright
 

sfhogman

Buckeye
Joined
Nov 18, 2002
Messages
1,844
Location
The living corpse of San Francisco Ca USA
I've told the story before, but wot the hey...
Years ago I was sitting in my father's back yard, chatting with with my Dad. We were probably talking about cars and what we liked and didn't like...small things of that nature.
As we talked, I lit a cigar and we kept talking. Suddenly he stopped, and his eyes filled with tears. When I asked him what was wrong, he looked puzzled and said he didn't know...we were quiet for a few minutes and then he said,
"It's your cigar! It put me in mind of my own Dad, and I still miss him...."..
That was many years ago, and the scent of a cigar still brings them both back to me.
Sometimes with tears.

Jeff
 

turd

Buckeye
Joined
Jan 8, 2012
Messages
1,013
Location
Sioux Falls, South Dakota
My Dad and I didn't always agree - he was pretty black and white and I was kind of grey. It took a lot of years for us to really admit we meant a lot to each other. I have two degrees, and just a couple of years ago I told him that I had learned more from him than any other person in my life. He didn't say anything, just kind of looked away, but I could see the tears in his eyes. He's gone now, but I wish we had those years back when we didn't agree.

Moral of the story - never miss a chance to tell your dad what he means to you.......
 

eveled

Hunter
Joined
Apr 3, 2012
Messages
4,246
I've told the story before, but wot the hey...
Years ago I was sitting in my father's back yard, chatting with with my Dad. We were probably talking about cars and what we liked and didn't like...small things of that nature.
As we talked, I lit a cigar and we kept talking. Suddenly he stopped, and his eyes filled with tears. When I asked him what was wrong, he looked puzzled and said he didn't know...we were quiet for a few minutes and then he said,
"It's your cigar! It put me in mind of my own Dad, and I still miss him...."..
That was many years ago, and the scent of a cigar still brings them both back to me.
Sometimes with tears.

Jeff
I had a similar situation. I forget what we were doing I looked up and my Dad was staring at me. I asked why. He said my Father used to whistle like that. Sort of a strange airy whistle
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
10,554
Location
Webster, MD.
My Dad had a 6th grade education and was one of the smartest men I have ever met. As has been said many times: Never let your schoolin' interfere with your education. He taught me more than I will ever realize.
 

mexicanjoe

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 7, 2010
Messages
372
Location
midland/odessa,texas
When dad passed away 50 years ago I remember a black limo pull up with state police escort, at the cemetery. A gentleman exited the vehicle and approached my grieving mother . After the burial he arrived at our house to speak to mom. I found out later he was a senator whose family my dad had helped during the depression. Apparently dad had supplied them with beef ,venison and other dry goods when times were hard. Dad put the boys to work in the cotton fields for spending money. The Senator informed my mother that he stood ready to help in any way he could in response to daddy helping him out. From wealthy influential people to the poorest, my dad gave, because he knew what it was like to have nothing. At his funeral the cemetery could not hold another vehicle, I had not idea that my dad , a cotton farmer did so much. Kinda proud of the ol' boy!
 
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