My #3 (warning picture heavy)

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Joined
Nov 3, 2008
Messages
18
Location
Bremen, Ohio
Just found this forum and thought I would show you my early summer project. I thought this Ruger #3 in 22 Hornet would look better with a nice Curly Maple stock.

I started this project April 7, 2008 and finished on June 13, 2008 (Friday the 13th)

Before
Ruger3B.jpg

After
Ruger3T.jpg


Ruger3C.jpg


Ruger3E.jpg


Ruger3L.jpg


Ruger3M.jpg


Ruger3N.jpg


Ruger3P.jpg


Ruger3R.jpg


ForendA.jpg


ForendB.jpg


ForendD.jpg


ForendE.jpg


Ruger3U.jpg


Ruger3V.jpg


Ruger3W.jpg


Ruger3X.jpg
 

I_Like_Pie

Blackhawk
Joined
Aug 24, 2006
Messages
659
Location
Chattanooga, TN
That wood is absolutely amazing. Simply beautiful. Thanks for sharing and welcome to rugerforum.com...what an entrance!!!


/on another note...there was someone here looking for some #3 furniture not long ago.
 

deac45

Single-Sixer
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Messages
392
Location
NW Georgia
Amazing! Welcome to the forum.

That's a rather unique looking vise, too. Any background on it?

deac45
 

41Dude

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 10, 2003
Messages
1
Location
Idaho
deac45":38ns29cm said:
Amazing! Welcome to the forum.

That's a rather unique looking vise, too. Any background on it?

deac45

Beat me to it :D AMAZING work!!!!!!!! But the vice is pretty cool.

deac45 and I are on the same page :lol:
 
Joined
Jan 20, 2008
Messages
2,187
Location
Orange County, CA
Now THAT is a great "upgrade"! I especially love the styling of the pistol grip; reminds me of a classic American double shotgun. The schnabel forend is also classic; functional and beautiful. I've seen lots of upgraded #3s, but this is the best.

A job you must be very proud of!
 

I_Like_Pie

Blackhawk
Joined
Aug 24, 2006
Messages
659
Location
Chattanooga, TN
Don Lovel":ed90pue9 said:
Beautiful!
I sure wish Ruger would pull it's corporate head out of it's corporate ass and offer a new run of #3 rifles with calibers like 454 Casull or the Winchester short mags


My shoulder is throbbing just thinking about a hot .454 load out of a #3. .45-70 plinkers hurt pretty bad as it is.

/But it would be cool if they did.
 

pvtschultz

Blackhawk
Joined
Oct 11, 2005
Messages
553
Location
West Allis, WI, USA
Wow, as a grip maker I can definately appreciate the work that you put in to that fine rifle. Congratulations on a fine job and welcome to the Ruger Forum.

Do you mind disclosing what you used for a stain? That look would be very nice on a single action revolver...
 
Joined
Nov 3, 2008
Messages
18
Location
Bremen, Ohio
Thank you for all the comments. This was my first attempt at a stock and a real learning experience. I have tried my hand at a few sets of grips and will post pictures of a set I made for one of the forum members. To answer a few of the questions, the vise is a “Carriage Makers” vice used for making wooden wheels. The jaws rotate all the way around. The rounded pistol grip was patterned after one of my doubles and the schnabel forend was patterned after a Sharps with a little modification. If you noticed I also did away with Ruger’s angled forend bolt and put this one in vertical. As for creating an Heirloom, I don’t know about that, but I am afraid to take it in the field after whistle pigs now LOL
 

1RugerFan_33

Single-Sixer
Joined
Mar 9, 2008
Messages
259
Location
Manitowoc, WI
Ohio Outdoorsman, that is BEAUTIFUL work and wood! I especially like the rounded pistol grip and forend. That is some fine work; welcome to the forum.

As twobisquit asked, I am wondering too, about how you finished that stock to make it look as such...? I have seen others done up like this, but cannot remember the process involved; it is more than just cating/staining, or the wood itself, isn't it?
 
Joined
Nov 3, 2008
Messages
18
Location
Bremen, Ohio
1RugerFan_33":3j2jsjn3 said:


As twobisquit asked, I am wondering too, about how you finished that stock to make it look as such...? I have seen others done up like this, but cannot remember the process involved; it is more than just cating/staining, or the wood itself, isn't it?

I finish sand to 600 grit then use Chromic acid to stain the wood. I put a coat on and let it
dry for 15 minutes then a second coat after it has dried for 15 minutes I wipe the wood down real good with straight ammonia this neutralizes the acid. I then wet sand it with 2000 grit 8 or 10 times using half and half turpentine and linseed oil with a little powdered Alkenet root mixed in (the Alkenet gives it a very light reddish cast). I allow 3 hours or more between wet sandings. This sanding brings a slurry
of what looks like mud up out of the grain. I then let it dry for a couple of days and start a hand rubbed oil finish. I use Min Wax "ANTIQUE OIL FINISH" it's hard to find, it's a tongue oil finish and comes in a red and black can, only place I can find it locally is Menards. I put a drop or 2 on let it set for no more than 2 minutes then buff
with a soft cloth. After 6 or 8 coats it will start looking real nice. Experiment with a piece of scrap. It's a lot of work but I haven't seen anything that can compete with it.
 

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