More tobacco lore.........

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Bob Wright

Hawkeye
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Jun 24, 2004
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The thread about tobacco tins has really spurred my memory!

I remember at least three that came in those flat tins; Prince Albert, Sir Walter Raleigh, and Half and Half. These fit neatly in the chest pocket of bib overalls, or "overhauls" as they were often called. The flat shape also made it easier to fill the cigarette paper when rolling your own. And, in addition to being such good targets, these tins were good containers for matches, Bobbi pins, paper money, anything needing a container.

In addition to those tins, some tobacco came in cloth bags. I remember there being two, Bull Durham, and I can't remember the other. The empty bags made good coin purses, though we nevered dared call them that. Also good for your rock collection, marbles, and what not. My Mother would never dare buy tobacco, but got Dad to buy some, even though he smoked ready rolls, and kept these in clothing and linen drawers as moth protection.

Also remember a carton of cigarettes, one hundred count, coming in a lithographed oval can with a friction lid. There was a sliding key to assist opening the can. These for those who carried a cigarette case. Usually a gold or silver case with built in cigarette lighter. This done by the swells of the day. My Mom had one of these containers and kept her manicure tools in it. Dad never used a cigarette case, always bought the old soft pack. And carried matches in the hat band of his felt hat. In lighting a cigarette, Dad often lifted his leg a little and struck the match along his outer thigh.

Dad had a big stuffed chair in the living room that was HIS chair. Not a recliner, as recliners had not been invented then, but with padded arms and a matching ottoman for his feet. There was a smoking stand next to his chair, cast iron and heavily nickle plated, with a simulated marble column. There was a tray at the top, also nickle plated. The tray contained a lidded container holding about twenty cigarettes, an ash tray, and an electric lighter. the lighter was made of the same stuff as the column, and when it was lifted and tilted, began to glow like a car cigarette lighter. Next to his chair was a magazine rack for the morning paper. His "throne" was close to the big gas stove, and he often slipped off his shoes to warm his feet, propped on the ottoman.

Enough ramblin'.


Bob Wright
 

stevemb

Hunter
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Aug 8, 2012
Messages
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Smoking was a part of our culture. I'm 57 or so, ran outta fingers n toes some time back. I remember ash trays built into furniture. Chrome plated ash trays, display worthy ash trays. Mom took the ash tray from the dining room table before serving dinner. I am SOOOO glad that when the very first surgeon general reports that smoking may be linked to cancer came out, BOTh of my parents quit within a month. I miss them so, and this might be the best lesson they taught me. Anyone stupid enough...best quit now.
 

Ray Newman

Single-Sixer
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WA ST
Bob Wright: the other brand in bags -- was that Bugler brand? Seems to me I recall seeing Bugler in a light blue pasteboard box and in the bag. Also recall the old timers making all sorts of storage containers from the vest pocket type tobacco tins.
 

737tdi

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May 31, 2006
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Scurry TX
A good replacement for those cans these days are Altoid cans (little peppermint candies). I carry several in my traveling tool box to hold screwdriver bits and such. They close fairly positively.

Karl
 

Whaler

Bearcat
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May 28, 2012
Messages
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Location
Sequim, WA
My mother was a smoker and I remember rolling cigarettes for her back in the late 40s on a machine like this.
Loose-shredded-tobacco-and-cigarette-roller-for-making-hand-rolled-cigarettes-Stock-Photo.jpg


As for me I joined the USAF in 1957 and I quickly learned how to say "Yes Sir", swear, drink and smoke. Kicked the smoking habit 5 years ago and wish someone had kicked me in the butt many years ago.
 

eveled

Hunter
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Apr 3, 2012
Messages
4,047
I don't know if this is true or not, but supposedly the little tag on the end of the string on the tobacco bag made a dandy target when hanging out of your shirt pocket.

Give the shooter something to focus on, right over a spot you don't want to take a bullet. So savy cowboys knew not to let the tag hang out.
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
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Jun 24, 2004
Messages
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Memphis, TN USA
Ray Newman said:
Bob Wright: the other brand in bags -- was that Bugler brand? Seems to me I recall seeing Bugler in a light blue pasteboard box and in the bag. Also recall the old timers making all sorts of storage containers from the vest pocket type tobacco tins.

That's it! Thanks for enlightening me. Couldn't bring Bugler to mind, but sure should have as it had that image of a Doughboy blowing the bugle.

Bob Wright
 
Joined
Oct 26, 2006
Messages
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Location
Woodbury, Tn
737tdi said:
A good replacement for those cans these days are Altoid cans (little peppermint candies). I carry several in my traveling tool box to hold screwdriver bits and such. They close fairly positively.

Karl
Yeah buddy. Even the larger tins have little survival kits deposited inside. :). If you need to be sure they won't open accidently, an rubber band will help.
gramps
 

LDM

Blackhawk
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Messages
587
I quit back when cigarettes hit a dollar a pack. I broke that down and calculated that sixty-five cents of that dollar was taxes. No way was I going to give politicians more of my money to waste.
 

exavid

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Jan 2, 2011
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Medford, OR
In 1960 when I had my MGA I used to keep a bag of Bull Durham under the seat. When it rained and the windshield got dirty, no squirters on a MGA, I used the bag of Bull Durham to wipe the windshield. It cut the road crud very well and made the wipers wipe clean.

For awhile after I gave up cigarettes and took up a pipe I used Prince Albert. It didn't smell particularly good but tasted fine. I eventually switched to Captain Black in the Blue pack. That tasted and smelled good. It's been over 35 years since I quit but I still don't mind standing downwind from a pipe smoker.
 

Pal Val

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May 30, 2006
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S.E. PA, USA
My grandfather had tobacco for a cash crop, and it was a lot of help during the Great Depression. He warned his children not to smoke, as he knew the stuff was poison. This is, for real, as they sprayed Lead Arseniate (aka "Green of Paris")on the plants to kill the pests. These were the days before DDT.

Both my uncle and my dad picked up smoking in the Army during WWII. My uncle has been lucky, having smoked into his '40 s, then quitting. My dad was not as lucky. Cancer got him.
 
Joined
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3,939
Location
MANSFIELD, OHIO USA
We used to use an old tobacco tin to carry our fishing gear. A hank of old braided fishing line, hooks, sinkers & stick bobbers. Another tin for bait like worms, grubs and wasp nests larva.
When we got to the creek we cut a pole rigged up and fished for chubs, rock bass or anything else that would bite. Those were good times!!:)
 

Mobuck

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Dec 25, 2007
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missouri
Right here in front of me (amidst the clutter) is a little cloth tobacco bag containing a dozen or so German or Italian coins that Dad 'liberated' in 1944. I happen onto it occasionally and find it a solid , comforting reminder.
Dad smoked but quit when I was maybe 2-3 years old. Three of my Uncles were heavy smokers (2 hand rolled cigs and 1 a pipe) but none seemed to have been adversely affected (other than 2 were fence rail thin for as long as I can remember). There was an old man just down the road from one Uncle's place who smoked hand rolled until he died in the early 70's. He had no close relatives so my Uncle took care of his estate and when they cleaned out the old shack, one closet was stacked FULL of empty tobacco cans. Probably thrown away, I'd like to have those now and sell them for $5 each to collectors.
 

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