More for seniors, who remembers............?

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caryc

Hawkeye
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,550
How about gas stations where someone actually pumped your gas, washed your windshield, checked your oil and put air in your tires while you just sat in the car. S&H green stamps too.
Yeah...that was the old Texaco Star man and he was all dressed in white with a smart little white cap on his head.
 

caryc

Hawkeye
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,550
How about the swamp coolers people had on the passenger side window of their cars before cars had air conditioning?
Don't forget the desert water bags that one hung on their front bumper. It was like a canvas material that would sweat water and keep it's contents cool due to evaporation. I remember my Dad using one when we crossed desert country driving from Texas to California in our old 1956 Chevy station wagon.

Lots of great memories in this thread. ❗
 

ole442

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 9, 2013
Messages
132
Location
Dayton, Ohio! Way too freakin' close to the city!
Remember those items. Here’s one, small black round metal balls filled with kerosene burning at work zones during the night.
I bought one last year.....it's a Toledo Torch! Pretty clean with little surface rust. I can't get the top screwed off to get to the wick and to fill it. I sprayed some PB Blaster on it, soaked it for a while but still stuck. I'll get back to it sooner or later. I remember messing with these when they worked on the streets back in the 50's and early 60's.
Smudge Pot 1.jpg



Smudge Pot 2.jpg
 

caryc

Hawkeye
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,550
I bought one last year.....it's a Toledo Torch! Pretty clean with little surface rust. I can't get the top screwed off to get to the wick and to fill it. I sprayed some PB Blaster on it, soaked it for a while but still stuck. I'll get back to it sooner or later. I remember messing with these when they worked on the streets back in the 50's and early 60's.
View attachment 7207


View attachment 7208
I remember lots of those used around my neighborhood. The strange thing is that I don't remember any of us kids ever messing around with them.

It seems that if anything deserved to be messed around with by a couple rambunctious kids it would be those things ❗
 
Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
5,547
Location
Richmond Texas USA
Anybody remember Earl Scheib? "I'll paint any car, twenty nine ninety five". Or you could get his diamond gloss paint job for $49.95.
Yep When he said he would paint the car HE MEANT the WHOLE car bumpers and chrome included. He had a shop in Columbus Ohio in 1959.

Don't forget the desert water bags that one hung on their front bumper. It was like a canvas material that would sweat water and keep it's contents cool due to evaporation. I remember my Dad using one when we crossed desert country driving from Texas to California in our old 1956 Chevy station wagon.

Lots of great memories in this thread. ❗

Dad got one for our 1939 Olds for crossing the deserts when we went from Maxwell AFB AL to Travis AFB CA in 1951. They were also a supply for extra radiator water
 

JiminMaine

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 2, 2012
Messages
87
Location
Western Maine
The best cigar wrappers were grown in Connecticut. They were used on high end Cuban cigars.
I grew up with a General Cigar tent tobacco field across the road from my house in Western Mass. Those cigar wrappers were grown in the Connecticut River valley. I worked for them in high school. Some og the local dairy farmers also grew a few acres of "Field Tobacco" that was used for cigarettes.
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
6,501
Location
Memphis, TN USA
Don't forget the desert water bags that one hung on their front bumper. It was like a canvas material that would sweat water and keep it's contents cool due to evaporation. I remember my Dad using one when we crossed desert country driving from Texas to California in our old 1956 Chevy station wagon.

Lots of great memories in this thread. ❗

We carried a water jug filled with ice each morning. Those bug-splattered canvas bags were a turn-off for my mother. And for me, too!

And, when was the last time you COULD HANG anything from your front bumper?

Bob Wright
 

caryc

Hawkeye
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,550
We carried a water jug filled with ice each morning. Those bug-splattered canvas bags were a turn-off for my mother. And for me, too!

And, when was the last time you COULD HANG anything from your front bumper?

Bob Wright
When? As I said it was 1956. We did not drink anything from that water bag. My Dad just used it as extra water for the vehicle if needed. Or if the vehicle did break down, at least one had some extra drinking water while waiting to get some help.
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2007
Messages
1,695
Location
Texas
40 years ago I used to have a vintage tire inflator that screwed into a spark plug hole on my chevy pickup’s 235 6 cylinder engine, and used that cylinder as a compressor. I think it was called an “Enginair”.
 
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Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
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Location
Memphis, TN USA
When? As I said it was 1956. We did not drink anything from that water bag. My Dad just used it as extra water for the vehicle if needed. Or if the vehicle did break down, at least one had some extra drinking water while waiting to get some help.

You and I are talking about the same era. We made a vacation trip to see my brother, who lived in Port Angeles, Washington, in the summer of either 1954 or 1955. Then again at the death of my brother's wife in February of 1956. We drove from Memphis to Port Angeles as direct as possible, then returned via the Southern route to avoid any bad weather. I don't remember driving on the vacation trip, but did do some of the driving for the funeral trip. Some of my first highway driving.

Bob Wright

Afterthought: Our vacation was in the summer of 1955. I recall that as I had just bought my first revolver, a Colt New Service .45 Colt, in Sept. of 1954, and we took that gun with us.

BW
 
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caryc

Hawkeye
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,550
40 years ago I used to have a vintage tire inflator that screwed into a spark plug hole on my chevy pickup’s 235 6 cylinder engine, and used that cylinder as a compressor. I think it was called an “Enginair”.
That's great but, don't forget to put a spark plug socket and ratchet in the box with it. Or at least one of those cheap spark plug removing tools like for lawn mowers.
 

bookemdano

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 10, 2012
Messages
107
Location
East TN
Here's a few things that I grew up with and have used. Everyone came from
my ancestorial home, 5 generations, before it was finally put to rest and a
new home built in its place where my brother still lives.
This is my fireplace. Burned wood for 45 years, switched to gas 10 yrs ago:
IMG_1689.jpg

Items: Small trap handed down from my papaws day. Behind it is a mason jar
opener.
IMG_1690.jpg

I've ground a tone of meat with this. Dates back 100 yrs.
IMG_1691.jpg

Another mason jar opener with that can punch holes in cans.
IMG_1693.jpg

A meat tenderizer with hatchet side to crack bones for marrow or bust
joints apart.
IMG_1694.jpg

A bacon press to keep your bacon flat and crisp and an old flat iron.
IMG_1695.jpg

Horseshoe from our old Clydesdale and a short corn pone stick pan.
IMG_1696.jpg

An old kitchen match holder.
IMG_1697.jpg

Granny's old butcher knife.
IMG_1698.jpg

You'll notice assorted flat irons, cast iron pots and skillets also. All this came
from the home I grew up in and as I said, I've personally used every single
item at one time or another when I was a kid up until I left for the army
in 67.
Dano
 

bookemdano

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 10, 2012
Messages
107
Location
East TN
Your meat grinder brings back memories. We also used ours to grind horseradish.
Mom and Granny would have had a fit if someone used hers for anything but meat.
"It'd spile the meat" as granny would say. We use ours for sausage, hamburger and
to jerk deer. Used to get blisters on my hands from grinding on hog killing day.
Dano
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2007
Messages
1,695
Location
Texas
That's great but, don't forget to put a spark plug socket and ratchet in the box with it. Or at least one of those cheap spark plug removing tools like for lawn mowers.
I always carried an Army Surplus canvas tool roll under the seat of that truck. It had a variety of tools that might be needed to maintain and repair the truck. Probably weighed around 15lbs. ;)
 

jack black

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 16, 2012
Messages
406
Location
East of Austin
1. Coffee cans with that little key attached. To open the can the key was engaged in the metal tab and wound around the can to peel away a strip of metal to open the can.

2. Those little can openers. They were opened up like a "Y", then pinched together to pierce the can lid. Then crank the handle to open the lid.

3.Aluminum ice trays with a top mounted lever to free the ice cubes.

4. Refrigerators with a freezer compartment big enough only to freeze four ice trays.

5. The rag man coming down your street asking for old rags. (And who knew what those rags were used for?)

6. Making tin can "telephones."

7. And Fatima cigarettes was the first sponsor of radio's "Dragnet."

8. Store bought cigarettes were called "Ready Rolls"

9. Automobiles "locking bumpers."

10. Burning leaves in the gutter.


Bob Wright
The good days.
 

Jeepnik

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 16, 2005
Messages
5,701
Location
On the beach and in the hills
40 years ago I used to have a vintage tire inflator that screwed into a spark plug hole on my chevy pickup’s 235 6 cylinder engine, and used that cylinder as a compressor. I think it was called an “Enginair”.
I keep one in my Jeep. It works, but it's slow. It takes up very little space and has come in handy dozens of times in the last 40 years. I think it may have been one of the first things I bought when I got my '82 Scrambler.
 

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