Mk III question

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tss106

Single-Sixer
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
135
Location
Texas
Well I got my new Mk III a couple weeks ago (5-1/2" blue bull barrel version). Studied the manual and field stripped it before shooting - fairly easy as long as I kept track of hammer position, mag in/out, etc. I shot it today for the first time, had 2 jams in about 150 rounds (CCI minimags) where the empty got hung up on the way out. Also had a couple instances of a round being chambered but trigger was not cocked so I had to manually eject the live round and cycle in another to cock the hammer? Not sure what's going on there?

I field stripped it again when we got home and gave it a good cleanup. Both times I've stripped it, I've had drive the bolt stop pin assembly out with a mallet/dowel and smack the receiver with a mallet to remove the barrel/receiver. Same thing going back together both times....., lots of mallet use to get the barrel/receiver back on and I have to smack the bolt stop pin assembly fairly good to get 'er back in. Is this fairly normal/common? Will I eventually be able to get it apart and put it back together without a mallet?

After today, my son and I decided we had as much or more fun with the Single Six......, no jams, easy to clean, and accurate. I'm already thinking I shoulda got another Single Six. Oh well, we'll play around more with the Mk III.
 

Wobble

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 31, 2009
Messages
45
Location
Georgia, USA
I'm not trying to be contentious but am simply curious. As a relatively new Mark III owner, why is it considered necessary to field strip and clean a brand new gun that is not gooped up with shipping grease? I didn't (didn't know I was supposed to) and the owner's manual never said it was necessary --and it's never given me a single problem. What am I missing?
 

tss106

Single-Sixer
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
135
Location
Texas
Wobble - maybe you're onto something there. I cleaned it before shooting because I figured there might be some packing grease, crud, metal chips, or something else in there that didn't belong. It also made me more familiar with how the pistol works (I'm an engineer, okay...., I can't help it!). Heck. maybe we'll just shoot it lots and only clean it without field stripping - for all I know it might not make any difference in how it functions.

How often do most of you guys field strip these things to clean 'em?
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
21,242
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
It is often suggested that all new guns be field stripped & cleaned & inspected before their first shooting trip. However,,, there are millions of guns bought by the average guy who have never been field stripped due to the lack of knowledge or willingness to do such maintenance.
They are just man-made mechanical objects which can be good or bad depending upon how well they were assembled & built.
I have several Standards, MKI's, MKII's and one MKIII around here. All the Standards, MKI's, & MKII's have been field stripped several times while they have lived here if they've been shot. But,,, I decided that the MKIII was gonna undergo a torture test of sorts. I'd heard some of the "problems" a few folks had been having with their MKIII's jamming, etc and decided that since I teach WOT clinics,,, a perfect proving ground would be in the hands of many different ladies to see how the gun will behave. Well, so far, after 2 clinics,, and around 400-500 rounds so far,,, I've not had any problems. I resolve to NOT take it apart & all until it does exibit problems for us.
To answer your problems,, it COULD be the choice of ammo. Sometimes semi's are picky about which types of ammo they prefer. Have you tried any different ammo?
 

zenbiker

Bearcat
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Messages
45
I had such trouble with the breakidown/reassembly untill I actually followed the procedure as recommended about 5 times. It's actually the easiest semi auto I own to take down. Just a piece of cake.
 

greener

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 29, 2006
Messages
132
Location
Glen Allen, VA, USA
Pretty much the same way with me, Zenbiker. The first time I field stripped and reassembled my Hunter the thechnical language was so strong the dog left the room and I had visions of a box of Ruger parts looking for a gunsmith. I repeated the process three times and haven't had any trouble with Rugers since.

This link has great instructions for solving the mysteries of Ruger field stripping. http://www.guntalk-online.com/fsprocedures.htm

If you are having to beat the bolt stop pin out of the receiver, it is likely that the receiver/gripframe bolt stop pin holes are not properly aligned. You can better align the holes by inserting the bolt stop pin in the top of the receiver. While pushing down on the pin, tap the muzzle or end of the receiver until the pin pushes through. (also shown on the guntalk site.)
 

Milly

Bearcat
Joined
Apr 26, 2009
Messages
35
Location
Jacksonville, Il. The nexus of the universe
I shot a few thousand rounds through my Mark III 22/45 before I field stripped it. It came apart and put back together fairly easily. I think shooting it a lot before hand loosened up the parts a little.

Next time you field strip it, remove the LCI tab and see if that helps with some of your jams.
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2005
Messages
8,851
Location
Greenville, SC: USA
I made the mistake of breaking down my MKIII also before shooting it... an hour later I finally got it back together.... it took two more trys after a few thousand rounds each time before I figure out the secret..... don't until you have too.

zenbiker, if the MKIII is the easiest to take down semi-auto you own you need to buy a P95.

tss106... try different ammo with the MKIII ... usually CCI mini-mags will work... also watch how that last round sits in the top of the magazine... the pistol should smooth out after a few 100 rounds.

I know this is blasphemy but I'd trade a single six for a MKIII any day... SS is my least favorite Ruger.
 

greener

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 29, 2006
Messages
132
Location
Glen Allen, VA, USA
Most .22 semiautos do not need to be cleaned frequently. The cleaning frequency is dependent on ammo and the amount of lubrication used. Some ammo seems to crud up the chamber on mine faster than others. Anything past a very light lube collects firing residue and gums up the bolt quickly.

I have a P90, about the same as a P95. My field strip and reassembly time for a MKIII is about the same as the P90, or SR9 or M&P. If ease of field strip is the criterion for owning a handgun, I suggest an S&W 22A. Very easy to field strip and assemble, plus a very accurate and reliable handgun. I don't think the MKIII is as difficult to field strip and reassemble as a 1911. I don't see folks ready to sell their Kimbers because they are so difficult to field strip.

Ruger could do themselves a favor by spending a little time in upgrading the field strip and assembly instructions in their manual. Their instructions are clear and correct if you know how to do the task when you read the instructions. The instructions are not so clear if you are a first timer. Since they have been making this design for about 50 years, it seems that they would have heard all the complaints about field stripping and addressed them in the manual years ago.
 

wwb

Hunter
Joined
Nov 18, 2004
Messages
2,787
Location
wisconsin
blume357":18xg00kn said:
.....zenbiker, if the MKIII is the easiest to take down semi-auto you own you need to buy a P95......

No, you need to buy a Mark II..... the pinnacle of Ruger .22 semi-auto development.
 

zenbiker

Bearcat
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Messages
45
The truth is that I found the takedown and reassembly such a pain in the butt that I decided to make the process a pet project. I spent about two hours with the gun disassembling and reassembling with instructions and videos. I must have done it twenty times! The only trick to it is knowing that the magazine has to be in to release the hammer and out to put the receiver or bolt in. Also the hammer strut dumbness and dangling it properly for the latch to go in.
Once you understand, it really is much easier than a 1911 or other semi-auto pistols. I'm no gunsmith but I can take it apart and back together in two minutes at most...unless I put the magazine in backwards which I've done twice. Now there is a problem to remove it!
 

greener

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 29, 2006
Messages
132
Location
Glen Allen, VA, USA
A guy saw my Rugers and mentioned that only a master gunsmith could field strip one and he always took his to a gun smith for cleaning. As I was demonstrating my blazing wallet fast draw he said "and that's why I sold it."
 

CajunBass

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 28, 2005
Messages
233
Location
North Chesterfield, Virginia
I don't think it's unusual to have to wack a MK III with a mallet (plastic or leather please :wink: ) at first to break it down. Those parts fit tight sometimes and need to be worn in a bit. You shouldn't have to "beat" it, but a sharp wack won't hurt anything.

I seldom break them down though. I just clean what I can with a Q-tip through the ejection port, shoot some gunscrubber (poly safe) in it, then a couple drops of oil, and I'm good to go.
 

greener

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 29, 2006
Messages
132
Location
Glen Allen, VA, USA
The plastic, rubber or leather hammer works best. I have used a carpeted floor, desktop padded with paper or the workbench padded with towel or paper if I was too lazy to get the hammer. The key is a sharp rap. You won't hurt the pistol as long as the surface will not mar it.

Oldsmoke: I am always ready to help out someone who is having a terrible time with his Ruger. Just never seem to get there in time. :lol:
 

zenbiker

Bearcat
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Messages
45
They do loosen up a bit with several disassemblies athough I still need the plastic mallet to get the receiver off and to seat it all the way on for that matter. Now I can get the bolt stop back in without tools at least.
 

tss106

Single-Sixer
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
135
Location
Texas
Hey, thanks for all the feedback and advice! I've decided to not take it apart again for awhile until after shooting it much more. I didn't have any problems following the instructions......, just seemed strange to have to use the plastic mallet so much. Ah heck, maybe I'll take 'er apart and play around with that bolt stop pin/alignment a little more - maybe I'm not getting the receiver in complete alignment.

Anyways, the boys and I are having fun with this pistol as well as the Single Six and thanks again for the advice and tips.
 

tss106

Single-Sixer
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
135
Location
Texas
Well, that lasted long (not taking it apart). I just took it apart again. At least I found out why it's so hard to get the bolt stop pin out or back in. No matter how much I tap, pull, push, or try to twist things, the receiver is out of alignment with the hole in the grip frame (that welded on little block with the thru-hole) just enough that the pin has to be force-driven in with the mallet. The pin goes thru all the individual parts easy or even the bolt in the receiver (without the grip)....., but if I try to get it in thru just the receiver/grip frame - no go. No problem taking apart or putting together as long as I got my plastic mallet.

I aint not taking it apart again....., at least until I shoot it lots more......, or maybe not. I'll probably wear the dang thing out taking it apart and putting it back together!
 

zenbiker

Bearcat
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Messages
45
tss....I've found that I need to whack the receiver into place with my plastic mallet to get it all the way back. If I do this, I can get the bolt stop in by hand. You can either whack the muzzle or put the muzzle down on your padded work bench and whack the frame at the back.
 
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