Manual safety on semi auto's or not?

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Joined
Mar 29, 2017
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Idaho
If the kid pulls the trigger, it WILL fire. You know that.

Months if not weeks after DC Metro police adopted the GLOCK, an officer's toddler daughter shot herself to death with her father's duty weapon. I can't think of any other kind of handgun where she could have done that.

Calling the GLOCK a "Safe Action" is probably the biggest lie in the history of firearms marketing. :oops:
I haven't heard of that story but believe you. Owners of any and every firearm have a duty to keep it out of children's hands unless the adults are teaching the children.
Cops are like many other people in this country. As that many first hold and shoot firearms after being hired. Terrible, I agree but it's that way.
Truth hurts, but here is some. As the PDs across the US flocked to rearm with Glocks, many from revolvers. The Glock became the #1 weapon that was shooting cops. It was their own weapon. Even after training, many forgot to clear the chamber. To clean the gun, they would remove the mag 1st. That part is right. BUT forgot to clear the chamber. Then pull the trigger to start the disassembly. If the gun was pointed at their legs etc they shot themselves. They failed, 1 to properly clear the gun as trained. 2 had the muzzle pointed at something that they should not be pointing at when pulling the trigger.
Also true event. Late 1980s. A Dept switched from revolvers to semi autos. I think they were S&W 39s. 2 older cops having recently switched got into a gun fight. Both drew guns to shoot the crook and forgot to remove the safety. I don't recall the outcome. That incident made the bean counters at the PDs push harder for a service gun that is drawn and fired without needing safeties switched on/off to fire. Just like the revolvers. Makes sense when mere moments count. Then training and using the brain god gave us to keep the gun safe until ready to fire is paramount. Not any different with the DA revolvers and like all firearms keep your finger off the trigger until ready and willing to fire.
 

Snake45

Hawkeye
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Not any different with the DA revolvers and like all firearms keep your finger off the trigger until ready and willing to fire.
Well, the DA revolver (and all true DA semiautos I know of) has a much longer, heavier trigger pull than any GLOCK.
 
Joined
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Greenville, SC: USA
I grew up shooting a S&W DA revolver... my father showed me how to cock the hammer and shoot it single action and that is how I pretty much always shot one. Years later I bought a S&W model 19, the single action pull on that gun is so light I ended up having to learn how to shoot it double action.
 

Pál_K

Single-Sixer
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Gig Harbor, WA, USA
I grew up shooting a S&W DA revolver... my father showed me how to cock the hammer and shoot it single action and that is how I pretty much always shot one. Years later I bought a S&W model 19, the single action pull on that gun is so light I ended up having to learn how to shoot it double action.
Other than for self-defense carry, where the hammer is down and all you'd need to do is pull the trigger, I don't see any other reason for double action revolvers with their long heavy pull. I never shoot mine in double action mode.
 

BearBiologist

Buckeye
Joined
Dec 4, 2021
Messages
1,969
I have Glocks (no safety), 1911s (multiple safeties), Springfield Armory (same), SA revolvers (no safety), NM Rugers (transfer bar safety) DA Revolvers. No biggie to me!
 

jkingrph

Bearcat
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Jul 31, 2006
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Jacksonville, Tx, USA
Sig 365X and I got it with the safety. Little gun, too close to my junk, heat of the moment usage is a trifecta for potential disaster. Not something I'm willing to risk. Can get a new safety free chassis for it for less than $100 and remove the safety and swap in the module in about 15m if I choose.
What do you mean by chassis, the polymer grip module. If that, you can simply remove the safety from the fire control unit, ie the serial numbered assembly that is legally the gun, and put your grip module that allowed the use of a safety and simply have two notches showing on the sides.
 

jkingrph

Bearcat
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Jul 31, 2006
Messages
64
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Jacksonville, Tx, USA
I started using semi auto's with a Browning HP, then a few 1911 types and a S&W M 41 target pistol, All have manual safeties, then started carrying a Sig P938, a micro 1911, and finally a couple of Sig P 365's, I chose the manual safety model because everything else has one and I am more comfortable with it.
 

hike

Bearcat
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Oct 15, 2023
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Tennessee
I purchase DA pistols with a manual safety. I can choose to use it or not. As I age, I find (1) having a MS means that I am showing "due diligence" to anyone who doesn't know and (2) it can provide a "safety net" when old people aren't as lucid as they once were.
I do also purchase pistols with decockers if the model doesn't have a MS version.
I do purchase Glocks but my familiarity with Glocks is decades old so I am comfortable using them and I know when and when not to carry them.
News Guns -- always a MS or decocker.
 
Joined
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Gorham, Maine
It doesn't matter what you choose as long as you TRAIN with what you run. I have and practice with Glocks, Sigs, 1911's, etc. As long as your business is taken care of between the moment that gun begins to clear leather to the moment it's pointed down range. In my crazy mind a good holster is more important than whether you run a manual safety or not. Every second matters when TSHTF!!
 

RC44Mag

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What do you mean by chassis, the polymer grip module. If that, you can simply remove the safety from the fire control unit, ie the serial numbered assembly that is legally the gun, and put your grip module that allowed the use of a safety and simply have two notches showing on the sides.
That's what I meant and corrected it later in that same post just didn't bother to replace it. I could have worded it better but alas didn't.
I did watch vids of it and it's a piece of cake. I'm no gunsmith but do tinker and tweak with my arms.
I don't want the holes on the side, for the paltry sum a new one will look nicer for decades to come and two less place for junk to get in, if I even decide to swap it. I do like the safety's and I'll see over time if it changes. Glad to have the option.
 
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GeorgeJones

Bearcat
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Feb 24, 2024
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Iowa
As a long time, dyed-in-the-wool 1911 enthusiast, I've always preferred a manual safety on my carry pistols...Which is flipped off instinctively, without even thinking about it upon drawing a weapon. But lately, I've purchased a few pistols sans such safties. And, I don't dislike them one single iota. What are your thoughts on the matter?
To each their own. I appreciate the extra security of a manual safety, but I think if you ever have to use a carry gun for it's intended purpose it might get in the way of that. You've just got to treat your gun like it's hot all the time. Like they say, the only real safety is between your ears.
 

GunnyGene

Hawkeye
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Nov 23, 2013
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Monroe County, MS
To each their own. I appreciate the extra security of a manual safety, but I think if you ever have to use a carry gun for it's intended purpose it might get in the way of that. You've just got to treat your gun like it's hot all the time. Like they say, the only real safety is between your ears.
 

Springer2

Bearcat
Joined
Aug 6, 2022
Messages
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Location
Florida
We have a LC9 with a manual safety. I consider it a valuable feature. One of the side benefits is the safety locks the slide in battery while holstering, unholstering, and helps prevent any debris getting in the action.
 

BULL'S-EYE

Blackhawk
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Dec 2, 2021
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To each their own. I appreciate the extra security of a manual safety, but I think if you ever have to use a carry gun for it's intended purpose it might get in the way of that. You've just got to treat your gun like it's hot all the time. Like they say, the only real safety is between your ears.
My current carry gun has no safety. Upon drawing it, I still instinctively swipe down with my thumb...It's just ingrained muscle memory.
 

Mike J

Hunter
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This is just my opinion & experience. I have carried with & without a safety. I have seen the time that I chose to leave the safety off thinking that way I wouldn't have to fool with it. Imagine my surprise when later on I found it had been bumped on. My opinion is carrying with or without a safety is fine. The important part is to train for whatever the manual of arms is for the pistol you are carrying. The pistol I currently carry has a safety. If I practice pulling it from the holster I practice disengaging the safety as the front sight comes up on target. If I am just shooting at the range, I engage the safety every time I reload so that I have to disengage it before shooting. Personally I believe that even if I were to choose to leave the safety off I should still train to turn it off as part of my draw. Safeties don't always stay the way we leave them.
 
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