Magnitizers

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Zonker5

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 31, 2015
Messages
16
Time and place for both. That’s why I keep both. But I tend to collect tools. I have some I have used maybe once. But they made the job easier.

A good example are my Vampire screw and bolt removal pliers. Works wonders on stripped fasteners.
Not familiar with the Vampire pliers, tell us more.
 

Joe Chartreuse

Single-Sixer
Joined
May 1, 2022
Messages
352
Location
New Jersey
I don’t know why CaryC wants one, but I love them. So many times the magnetic tip provided just enough hold to keep from dropping my tiny screw into the great unknown.

Bob, why would you not want one?
While I do often use magnetized screwdrivers ( I use an old tape eraser ) there ARE times when one should not, such as when one is working on electronic and / or audio equipment. It can play hell with certain chips, some electrolytic caps, and coils. It could also demagnetize an audio head / video head.
 

caryc

Hawkeye
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,799
Location
Southern California
Clear up one thing for me... I understand how you magnetize the tip of the screw driver by rubbing it against the magnet, but how do you de-magnetize it?
On the little magnetizer, to de magnetize the screw driver, you just rub it along the flat spot on the outside of the magnet.

On the big magnet you just have to run the blade up and down a couple times with the screw driver between the two legs of the magnet without touching one of the legs and it is no longer magnetized. This was not easy to do for me with one hand on the camera since that magnate is so strong but it does work.

Do not ask me to explain the science of it, I just know it works.

pbTPcky.jpg

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Ka6otm

Blackhawk
Joined
Dec 21, 2002
Messages
645
I don’t know why CaryC wants one, but I love them. So many times the magnetic tip provided just enough hold to keep from dropping my tiny screw into the great unknown.

Bob, why would you not want one?
I'm with you Kevin. I have screwdrivers without them, but I always want at least one magnetized one around for things.
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
6,675
Location
Memphis, TN USA
Well, y'all have pointed out one thing I overlooked, and that is what is the thing you are working on. Most of my work involves many parts laid out on my work bench. Laying my screw driver sown, then picking it up again I found many small parts or screws dangling from the tip. This I found aggravating. But, working on larger projects I can see where one would be useful.

Y'all have educated me in the field of driving screws.

Bob Wright
 

caryc

Hawkeye
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,799
Location
Southern California
Well, y'all have pointed out one thing I overlooked, and that is what is the thing you are working on. Most of my work involves many parts laid out on my work bench. Laying my screw driver sown, then picking it up again I found many small parts or screws dangling from the tip. This I found aggravating. But, working on larger projects I can see where one would be useful.

Y'all have educated me in the field of driving screws.

Bob Wright
You ever change a set of points in a regular old style distributor? Some are in hard places to get at besides not being able to get one's fat fingers in it to start a screw. Luckily they make pretty neat small screw starters just made for that job now. I'll get you a picture of mine tomorrow. I use it on my tractors.
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2005
Messages
9,317
Location
Greenville, SC: USA
Another way to de-magnetize something is a sharp blow or big "tap" on something hard. When you magnetize something you are aligning the molecules. A sharp blow to something hard will scramble them.
I like to proof read my posts before sending them and this one sounds like I have been smoking something. But I have found it to be true.

Maybe it's just me redfernclan, but when I read your post above it made me laugh.. ... nothing to do with the magnetism subject but your last two sentences..... they were worth reposting.
 

caryc

Hawkeye
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,799
Location
Southern California
These are pics of a tiny screw starter used in tight places like inside a distributor.

On the ends, you see a black collar. This collar turns the middle of the flat blade on an angle and locks the screw onto it. It works on phillips and regular slot screws. It's a very handy thing to have.

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