Low Country Boil ???

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Swampbilly_2

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Jan 27, 2015
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Here's some info I found:

Why is it called a low country boil?
Over the years the dish became more popularly known as "Lowcountry Boil" because of the key ingredient, shrimp, which is a principal product of the Lowcountry. Many recipes differ, but the staple ingredients of shrimp, sausage, corn and potatoes remain the same.

How do you serve Lowcountry boil?
Place the seafood boil on newspaper or serving platters and garnish with parsley. Serve with lemon wedges, melted butter, cocktail sauce, and hot sauce.

What is another name for low country boil?
A low country boil, also known as a tidewater boil, beaufort stew or beaufort boil, and most commonly, Frogmore Stew

Whats the difference between Frogmore Stew and Low Country Boil?
Low Country Boil and Frogmore Stew is one and the same. Frogmore is a little area in SC between Savannah and Charleston. Typically it will consist of potatoes, Sausage, corn, onions and shrimp boiled in a crab boil season.


What is a High Country Boil?
A high country boil is exactly what it sounds like. Its a low country style boil, using invasive Signal crawfish, that are caught in the high country. The high country being the eastern side of the Sierra Nevada.

IT DON'T MATTER WHAT IT'S CALLED IT IS, FER SURE, FINE EATIN'

Having once lived in Louisiana, for many years....I went to many boils using crawfish.
We never called them, "High Country Boils"....always said, "We're having a Crawfish Boil."
Sometimes, we'd boil all three - Crawfish, Blue Point Crabs, and Shrimp....just called it a Seafood Boil or Crawfish, Crab, & Shrimp Boil.
 
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RC44Mag

Bearcat
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I love all sea food and especially shrimp and lobster but have never been able to get attached to mud bugs....
Agreed. They taste for a lack of a better word muddy and dull to me. Ive eaten them quite a few times but just can’t get to enjoying them. That’s ok, Atlantic lobsters fresh out of the ocean are about 3 miles away from me.
 

RC44Mag

Bearcat
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I can’t tell you because I don’t know what a signal is but I’ve only eaten them in Florida and S Carolina
 

contender

Ruger Guru
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Lake Lure NC USA
Jim,, that's just plain WRONG to show such a FINE table fare. I'm a fan of crawfish, (mudbugs etc,) and I've had them in many places including Tx & La. Delicious,, ESPECIALLY if allowed to sit in clean water for a few days & purge themselves of any mud taste.
Properly cooked with the right seasoning,, hard to beat.
 
Joined
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Woodbury, Tn
I love shrimp, lobster, and clams. You can have oysters, and blue crab. Crawfish for me are too little meat for the work involved. IMO. The low boil at Contenders’s ROCKS!!!
gramps
 

freakindawgen

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Location
Perryville,MO
I always thought cab was too much work for the amount. Love crawfish boils! Moved back to Iowa after 20+ years and want to have one. Options suk. Have live ones shipped from LA, expensive. Can trap here as plenty in waterways but....Iowa law says you can't transport live!.
 

eveled

Hunter
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Apr 3, 2012
Messages
4,073
I can’t tell you because I don’t know what a signal is but I’ve only eaten them in Florida and S Carolina
@RoninPA mentioned the invasive species so I was curious about them.

I went down a google rabbit hole there are a lot of different species. Some live on land and burrow in the ground. They are still finding new species.

The signal crawfish is taking over in some places. Probably why you cant transport live ones in Iowa. Indiana has a huge population of large land ones! Who knew?
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2007
Messages
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Location
Dallas, TX
The signal crawfish is taking over in some places. Probably why you cant transport live ones in Iowa.
I don't understand. you can't transport live crawfish...Oh wait, I just got it. They don't want the signal crawfish to be transported and allowed to populate a new area?

How are these invasive species? They aren't very big. I would assume they eat mosquitos and other tiny no-see-um's correct?
 

eveled

Hunter
Joined
Apr 3, 2012
Messages
4,073
some invasive movements happened on purpose. Some from people using them for bait.

I think they eat dead stuff that settles to the bottom. They break up the big pieces allowing smaller organisms to eat. They are an important part of the ecosystem.

The borrowing ones eat worms and stuff like that.

They’ve found blind clear ones in deep caves with no light.

When I was a kid I was playing in the water at a lake and realized there were baby crayfish in the sand.

I caught as many as I could about 30 1/8” crayfish. I brought them home put them in my fish tank. They all found their own little hiding place. It was pretty cool. At night they would all wander around the tank and eat.

The fascinating thing was only one got bigger. A lot bigger pretty fast. So I pulled him out and another one started to get bigger the rest stayed tiny. I had them in my tank for something like 3 years. Some of them were the same tiny size for 3 years!

Every once in a while I’d have a big one escape I would usually find them in the corner of the room. Same thing with turtles. Sitting in the corner all dried up. Most of them survived. A few I didn’t find until I replaced my mothers furnace.
 
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