Little Big Horn Montana

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Joined
Dec 3, 2021
Messages
330
Location
Georgia
Found out something I didn't know today. While looking at the monument and all the information stations posted I came across this one. I never knew that other people from other wars were also buried there along with the Indians and Custer's Soldiers. Linda and I made it a point to search out all the Vietnam Vets and place a penny on to of their grave stones.

Little Big Horn 1 IMG_2039.jpg

Little Big Horn 2 IMG_2037.jpg

Little Big Horn 3 IMG_2038.jpg
 

Rocdoc

Buckeye
Joined
Aug 23, 2008
Messages
1,412
Location
N. Texas
Wife and I visited monument on or quest of visiting as many NPS sites as possible while we can still travel. Little Big Horn took our collective breath away, hallowed ground. The driving trail passeses headstones where th trooper fell.Yep national cemetary, owerwhelming all the suffering, all the brave young men burried there, very sad, proud of every single one of them!
 

Rum River

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
39
If I'm traveling within a couple hundred miles of the battlefield I always include a visit there.

Like Rocdoc mentions, seeing the markers placed where the troopers originally fell is very sobering. While there is the cluster on top of Last Stand Hill, it really gets your attention how spread out many of the others are. There are places where there are only two or three off by themselves and hundreds of yards from their fellow troopers.

If you go there, be certain to drive the loop to where Major Reno's command fought, it's just a few miles from Custer's location.
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2005
Messages
9,165
Location
Greenville, SC: USA
If you do some research on how the Sioux fought and treated anyone captured you would not be surprised at the distance some of the soldiers 'fell'... I suspect there are some still unaccounted for, probably miles away.
 
Joined
Jul 7, 2022
Messages
19
Location
CO/WY
My great great uncle was the rider Custer sent to relay his orders to MacDougall’s pack train and to have Benteen rejoin the force at the onset of the battle. He was almost certainly the last American to see Custer’s contingent alive. He delivered the messages and wound up fighting from Reno’s Hill until the Sioux withdrew.

It’s a very somber place, and Crow Agency is pretty sad. I spent most of my adult life in third world countries and people live better in some of them.
 
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Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
6,491
Location
Memphis, TN USA
A friend of mine, a retired Air Force Major General, was always sort of on their case, of National Cemeteries. Because in foreign lands, graves are marked with a cross or Star of David, while here in the US they use those rounded stones.
 

Huskerguy72

Bearcat
Joined
Mar 19, 2017
Messages
79
Location
Central Kansas
Well, I have some connection to the General. My last name is Custer. It is farily easy to do a genealogy search for my family and his and I found thr connection. The original Custers with various spellings can be traced back to the 1400's. They came to the U.S. and settled Germantown in Pennsylvania at the invitation of William Penn. There were 6 boys and Gerorge came from one branch that had a lot if military experience, mine from another.

As for thrbattlefield, we spent an entire day walking all the areas. Once you see how big it is and the terrain, it is much easier to visualize how things transpired. The Indians call it the Battle of Greasey Grass. There are certainly many points of view on what happened there but many agree the Custer's intent was to capture the women and children which is why he split his forces and it was fone many times successfully but the goal was to capture the women and children. So the warriors would quit. He simply didn't anticipate roughly 2,000 braves from various tribes.
 
Joined
Jul 15, 2022
Messages
29
Location
AZ
I have been there 3 times. The first time was 1971 and at that time you could walk out on the battlefield. The last time it was restricted. As many have mentioned its a rather sober place.
 

ole442

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 9, 2013
Messages
120
Location
Dayton, Ohio! Way too freakin' close to the city!
My Grandfather on my mother's side was born 4 years later in Nebraska (2 states away). He was born in 1880 during the time his Father was a minister out there. They lived in a sod house when they first arrived. He was 52 years old when my mother was born and was kind of like my Great Grandfather. He talked different. He said when he was a kid, he saw lots of Indians in their traditional clothing. He remembered seeing Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show! When I went to my son's wedding in Denver last year, we went north and stayed overnight near where he was born but, in the morning, there was a gully washer outside, so we just drove on into Denver. Next time we go, we'll make time to stop there and a lot of Lewis & Clark locations on the way!
 

BearBiologist

Blackhawk
Joined
Dec 4, 2021
Messages
520
My paternal grandfather was born in Pendleton, OR in 1898. Rode EAST on the Oregon Trail in a Conestoga and his family settled near the Canadian border on the great plains. He returned to Pendleton as a teen and rode in the Pendleton Round-up and Calgary Stampede (according to his income ledger, he won $200 at Calgary). He used to watch the local tribes return from catching salmon in the Columbia. They could camp in the schoolyards and each night would build a teepee and string their salmon around it (nose to tail). A fire would smolder all night, smoking the salmon. The next day, they would move on and string the fish the opposite direction that night.

He had little use for the Indians (Wannapums, Yakamas, and Warm Springs. Maybe some Nez Perce). He almost disowned my dad when he found out my mom was Cherokee/Chickasaw/Irish. My dad (even though the eldest) did fall from favor.
 

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