Lee Enfield Movie Prop Weapon

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Joined
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Wow, this is pretty cool. I knew Adam Savage had a YouTube channel, and have watched one or two of his videos. I wish he had shown how the gun was made. But he does provide some close up shots of the rifle.

The youtube video is about a rubber Lee Enfield rifle used in the movie Dunkirk.

I've got a Lee Enfield, they are very fun to shoot, not much recoil and VERY accurate. The bolt is spring assisted to allow the soliders to fire faster.

 

Rick Courtright

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Mar 10, 2002
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Redlands CA USA
Hi,

On the operating speed, fans of the Enfield know about the "mad minute." If that doesn't ring a bell, a quick search should be fun. Especially if you pick one with the Ol' Gunny. Miss him...

Rick C
 

Rocdoc

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Interesting read, really shows what a well trained rifleman can do. So much for the spray and pray these days
 
Joined
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Part of me has a deep respect and regard for the old school bolt action.....

One of my regrets in life is to have never gotten a detailed story of my father's time in Korea. He carried and I presume used a '03 Springfield with a scope on it... but then him and his comrades ended up 'spraying and praying' for several nights... they melted two water cooled machine guns one night.
 

Mobuck

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'The bolt is spring assisted to allow the soliders to fire faster.'
This must be a 'special' model. The bolt movement is only 'spring assisted' when the striker is still cocked. The bolt design is 'cock on closing' which, depending on thought process, may be considered 'better' than 'cock on opening' BUT, the fact that the Enfield was the last mass produced bolt action to use cock on close indicates that there are better designs.
 

eveled

Hunter
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Apr 3, 2012
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If you hold the trigger down when you close the bolt it will not cock. Easier than holding the striker and pulling the trigger to uncock it after. For storage obviously.

Beautiful rifles.
 

Bob Wright

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Sure, there are "better" designs, the M-1 Rifle being an example. But cock on closing supposedly had a slight advantage, as there was the momentum of closing the bolt offering an advantage.

The old "Smelly" ( SMLE ~ Short Magazine Lee Enfield) was one rugged rifle and endured well into the semi-auto age.

Bob Wright
 

Enigma

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Sure, there are "better" designs, the M-1 Rifle being an example. But cock on closing supposedly had a slight advantage, as there was the momentum of closing the bolt offering an advantage.

The old "Smelly" ( SMLE ~ Short Magazine Lee Enfield) was one rugged rifle and endured well into the semi-auto age.

Bob Wright

When I was in Qatar in 2005-2006, one unit had an SMLE made in 1916, IIRC, that they had obtained somewhere. They're still out there, and still in use in some areas.
 

eveled

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@blume357 You have more details than most sons of combat veterans. They didn’t like to talk about it. I’ve always enjoyed you posts about your dad. Thanks for sharing.

One picture in particular his hands and fingers are all knarled and bent. Reminds me of my grandfather’s hands. They must of been sore but he never complained.
 

Bob Wright

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As to "rubber" movie guns, those Single Action Colts that were thrown across the room in John Wayne's dying scene in "The Shootist" were of that sort.

The guns used i that movie show, by the way, were Great Western revolvers presented to John Wayne by Bill Wilson around 1953 or 1954, and are depicted in Elmer Keith's work "Sixguns By Keith."

Bob Wright
 

aaronrb204

Bearcat
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bowling green, va
'The bolt is spring assisted to allow the soliders to fire faster.'
This must be a 'special' model. The bolt movement is only 'spring assisted' when the striker is still cocked. The bolt design is 'cock on closing' which, depending on thought process, may be considered 'better' than 'cock on opening' BUT, the fact that the Enfield was the last mass produced bolt action to use cock on close indicates that there are better designs.
The Mauser 98 lockup allowed for a stronger action but had various disadvantages. The Lee-Enfield family was able to be fired faster and most shooters were able to work the action without losing sight picture. However it was not adaptable to more powerful chamberings as we have seen the Mauser action was over the last 120 years.

As to the mad minute drill, the trigger was worked with the middle finger while the thumb and forefinger held the bolt handle. This way there was no need to constantly reposition the hand. During the early days of The Great War, especially at Mons, the BEF was thought by many German soldiers to be armed with hundreds of machine guns. Those divisions were made of the best trained soldiers in Europe and probably the world. They were able to keep up a sustained and well aimed volume of fire that was decidedly unexpected by the enemy. They were of course pushed back by overwhelming numbers and as the war dragged on and training decreased, that capability was lost.

I had an Ishy for a while. It was a dog but it was fun. I miss the smoothness of that action.
 

6GUNSONLY

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I have a very nice condition Mk 5 No. 1 ("jungle carbine) that I love. I put a scope on it for a while just to see what the accuracy potential was, and obtained 1.25" to 1.5" 100 yard groups consistently. I never saw the " wandering zero" these were known for with my rifle. Of course I never fired it as fast as possible for 200 rounds, either. I've killed several deer with it with handloaded 150 and 175 grain softpoints. I think they are wonderful old rifles, tried in battle and utterly reliable.
 

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