Lcp max design

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brianp

Bearcat
Joined
Jun 15, 2023
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Middleton, Idaho
As a new LCP Max owner, I am a bit confused on its design related to DA & SA terminology. Is it correct that racking the slide, either manually or by firing it, puts the internal hammer into a half-cock position so that the trigger's function is to fully cock & then release the hammer? If so, it would explain why it is designated as DAO, meaning the trigger must cock the hammer & release it.
 

ImDrRich

Bearcat
Joined
May 25, 2023
Messages
22
Location
NYC
Welcome to the Forum. The LCP Max is a double action only semi-auto. There is no half-cock position of the hammer, which can be seen in the firing position when a round is in the chamber. I believe the gun is considered double action as there is travel distance for the trigger before every round is fired.

Enjoy your LCP Max. It is a fantastic little firearm.
 

brianp

Bearcat
Joined
Jun 15, 2023
Messages
2
Location
Middleton, Idaho
Hi, Bearcat. Well, it is confusing, as I always thought double action meant the gun could be fired either by pulling the trigger to cause the hammer to move to full cock & then release on the same trigger pull, or just release the hammer that is already cocked. I have an older LCP and when I watch the hammer from the rear of the gun, it is all the way up & therefore not cocked even after racking the slide. Pulling the trigger moves the hammer all the way down (toward the rear of the gun) & releases it to fire. When the slide moves after firing & puts another cartridge in the chamber, the hammer is back to fully up & not cocked. The LCP max is different. Slide motion moves the hammer almost all the way to fully cocked but leaves it there. The trigger moves the hammer the rest of the way to fully down (cocked) & releases it to fire. It appears that Ruger did this to lessen the amount of trigger force to fire the gun, make the trigger pull smoother & probably contributed to their decision to put a motion safety on the trigger itself. Anyway, those are my observations that may or may not be correct as I'm no gunsmith.
 

IPSC

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 7, 2022
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Galivants Ferry, SC
This ends up being confusing. Take one apart and look at the mechanism....or even look at Ruger Ad-copy with an X-ray view of the internals. Here's the deal which can be confusing. The gun is SAO. When the slide is racked back and released, the hammer is rotated back ( for sake of argument, "fully"....but let's say it's 90 degrees). When you pull the trigger,....yes, the trigger rocks back more, but only a BIT more....say to 91-93 degrees. This is due to the hammer/sear interface which is not perfectly "square" surfaces between these 2 pieces, but each is a bit angled to create a "locking" effect between the 2 mating surfaces...so the hammer has less of a chance to be jarred off the sear. This is COMPLETLEY DIFFERENT...than (say) a Glock, where the slide action compresses the striker spring about 60%....and pulling the trigger compresses the striker spring, the remaining 40%. Or even compared to a Kahr pistol where pulling the trigger compresses the spring from zero to 100% and it then releases (DAO). The MAX has it's spring pretty much "fully-compressed" after the slide action cocks the pistol. And then this point---> yes, MAX does have a half-cock notch between the hammer and sear. If after all this....if the hammer should ever slip off the sear without consciously pulling the trigger,.... it will be arrested half-way down by this half-cock notch... and will not strike the primer.
Just to illustrate....here's an article describing the 3 ways a hammer/sear interface can exist....positive / negative / neutral. MAX has "positive" angles ---> https://jovianthunderbolt.blogspot.com/2018/01/searhammer-engagement.html
With "positive" sear engagement geometry,... the hammer will always rock back a bit from it's "true" full-cocked position when pulling the trigger.
 
Last edited:

bear007

Bearcat
Joined
Feb 28, 2013
Messages
88
Location
Western PA
I just won an LCP Max 75th Anniversary model last night at a Friends of the NRA banquet. I hadn't even seen or held one yet. Hopefully it will replace my LCP II.
It should easily replace you LCP2. It's only a tiny bit bigger than the LCP2 and has some fair sights on it for a pocket pistol. LCP2 sights aren't much as I remember. I traded in my 2 for the max when it came out. I bought the 12 round mag 2 pack. 12+1, +12, not bad for a pocket pistol. It is my go to when I am limited to pocket carry. And as all my Rugers, it's very reliable, it shoots every time.
 
Joined
Jun 19, 2006
Messages
4,256
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Midwest Illinois
I took mine to the range and fired 100 rounds through it. Five different loads using all 4 magazines with no problems. After one more trip to concentrate on which ammo it prefers it will replace my LCPII as a secondary EDC. My Max-9 is my first choice for EDC. I will keep my LCPII to carry when working in my garage or yard.
 

gunmanjones

Bearcat
Joined
May 22, 2024
Messages
6
Location
Blytheville, AR
This ends up being confusing. Take one apart and look at the mechanism....or even look at Ruger Ad-copy with an X-ray view of the internals. Here's the deal which can be confusing. The gun is SAO. When the slide is racked back and released, the hammer is rotated back ( for sake of argument, "fully"....but let's say it's 90 degrees). When you pull the trigger,....yes, the trigger rocks back more, but only a BIT more....say to 91-93 degrees. This is due to the hammer/sear interface which is not perfectly "square" surfaces between these 2 pieces, but each is a bit angled to create a "locking" effect between the 2 mating surfaces...so the hammer has less of a chance to be jarred off the sear. This is COMPLETLEY DIFFERENT...than (say) a Glock, where the slide action compresses the striker spring about 60%....and pulling the trigger compresses the striker spring, the remaining 40%. Or even compared to a Kahr pistol where pulling the trigger compresses the spring from zero to 100% and it then releases (DAO). The MAX has it's spring pretty much "fully-compressed" after the slide action cocks the pistol. And then this point---> yes, MAX does have a half-cock notch between the hammer and sear. If after all this....if the hammer should ever slip off the sear without consciously pulling the trigger,.... it will be arrested half-way down by this half-cock notch... and will not strike the primer.
Just to illustrate....here's an article describing the 3 ways a hammer/sear interface can exist....positive / negative / neutral. MAX has "positive" angles ---> https://jovianthunderbolt.blogspot.com/2018/01/searhammer-engagement.html
With "positive" sear engagement geometry,... the hammer will always rock back a bit from it's "true" full-cocked position when pulling the trigger.
".if the hammer should ever slip off the sear without consciously pulling the trigger,.... it will be arrested half-way down by this half-cock notch... and will not strike the primer."

Thank you for this! I'm a noob to this forum but have decades of firearms handling experience. I've been searching EVERYWHERE for months for this exact information to help me feel more at ease carrying with the hammer under spring load behind a live round with no manual safety (cocked but not locked).
 

IPSC

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 7, 2022
Messages
30
Location
Galivants Ferry, SC
@gunmanjones.... thank you. I am a technical person by training, and I try to understand "the design" of stuff whatever it may be. I often see forums with either wrong or partial-truths expressed, but I sincerely believe my description of the LCP Max design and features is correct. Aside...I come from 1911 platform training...so it seems ( like you), I had MANY reservations about this design lacking a thumb safety. This deep-dig into the design makes me too feel more comfortable carrying cocked with a loaded chamber. Let me go further however, for completeness' sake, and not to spook you. The remaining issue is that there is no mechanism that absolutely prevents the firing pin from striking the primer...like the FP locking device shown in many (all?) Glocks. The MAX design relies on a very strong FP spring ( did you notice how STIFF this is?... if you push it in with a rod or pencil when he slide is removed?)...PLUS... the FP is made od super lighweight titanium...all to help prevent unwanted FP contact with the primer in case the gun drops onto a hard floor, muzzle-down. So...even though it lacks the Glock-style FP block....I consider this to be an acceptable risk factor...as the gun would (in the worst case) go "off" with the muzzle pointed down on the hard surface it falls down upon.
 
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