Landing gear?

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Bob Wright

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The Japanese designed a single engine plane solely for kamikaze use. It was a one-way flight only. Its undercarriage was not a part of the plane but was jettisoned at take-off. This was the Ki-115. It carried a bomb on a fixed bomb rack with no release.

So I reckon the undercarriage should never be referred to as "the landing gear?"

Bob Wright
 

txramfan

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Germany also flew a plane with no landing gear.

ME 163 landed on its body, having taken off on a wheeled assembly that wasn't attached.

It was rocket powered.
 

Bob Wright

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Germany also flew a plane with no landing gear.

ME 163 landed on its body, having taken off on a wheeled assembly that wasn't attached.

It was rocket powered.
The Ki-115 had a big propeller out front that didn't fare too well on belly landings. But if a pilot did make it back and bellied in, I don't imagine HE fared too well, either.

Bob Wright
 

txramfan

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I'd never heard of the K 115, of course knew of the Kamikaze attacks by Japan.

I was amazed a few years ago when I learned Germany had pilots purposely collide with bombers.
 

Bob Wright

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I do remember reading of a Japanese kamikaze pilot who had two missions to his credit. On his first mission he was shot down and rescued by a Japanese patrol boat. On his second, he was shot down again but rescued by US Navy ships. He survived the War and was alive when last heard from.

Bob Wright
 
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Saburō Sakai Japan Highest scoring ace also went on a round trip kamikaze mission.
If you get a chance read his book it is very good

autobiography Samurai!, co-written by Martin Caidin and Fred Saito, claims 64 aerial victories.


Sakai said he was ordered to lead a kamikaze mission on 5 July, but he failed to find the U.S. task force. He was engaged by Hellcat fighters near the task force's reported position, and all but one of the Nakajima B6N2 "Jill" torpedo bombers in his flight were shot down. Sakai managed to shoot down one Hellcat, then escaped the umbrella of enemy aircraft by flying into a cloud. Rather than follow meaningless orders, in worsening weather and gathering darkness, Sakai led his small formation back to Iwo Jima.

He also flew the last combat mission of the war
Saburō Sakai participated in the IJNAS's last wartime mission, attacking two reconnaissance Consolidated B-32 Dominators on 18 August, which were conducting photo-reconnaissance and testing Japanese compliance with the cease-fire.


The nakajima ki-115
1669858766875.png
 

Snake45

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Saburō Sakai Japan Highest scoring ace also went on a round trip kamikaze mission.
If you get a chance read his book it is very good

autobiography Samurai!, co-written by Martin Caidin and Fred Saito, claims 64 aerial victories.


Sakai said he was ordered to lead a kamikaze mission on 5 July, but he failed to find the U.S. task force. He was engaged by Hellcat fighters near the task force's reported position, and all but one of the Nakajima B6N2 "Jill" torpedo bombers in his flight were shot down. Sakai managed to shoot down one Hellcat, then escaped the umbrella of enemy aircraft by flying into a cloud. Rather than follow meaningless orders, in worsening weather and gathering darkness, Sakai led his small formation back to Iwo Jima.

He also flew the last combat mission of the war
Saburō Sakai participated in the IJNAS's last wartime mission, attacking two reconnaissance Consolidated B-32 Dominators on 18 August, which were conducting photo-reconnaissance and testing Japanese compliance with the cease-fire.


The nakajima ki-115
View attachment 11522
I always thought that was a cool-looking airplane and would be a great candidate for a modern homebuilt recreation (maybe with slightly increased wing area). Same goes for the Bell XP-77, too.
 

eveled

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My Dad worked with a Kamikaze pilot. Apparently the war ended before his day to fly.
 
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