Knives and sharpening stones

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I was sharpening some kitchen knives. I have a nice electric sharpener for those. It keeps them sharp relatively easy.

I also have a sharpening stone for pocket knives. One side is 300 and the other is 1000. But I’m wondering if 1000 is enough. I just sharpened a couple knives, and they are definitely sharper than before, I think they could still be sharper.

I know this topic comes up regularly. But in regards to flat stones, what number is best to get a nice edge? Anybody have a preference? India stone vs Arkansas stone? There are all sorts available to buy. But I thought I’d ask opinions here first.
 

Pat-inCO

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Before you even look at what stones and grit size, think about how you are going
to hold a CONSISTENT angle on the edge.

Second point is how much wear is there on your stone? When do you replace it,
or re-cut the surface so it is flat?

I use the Lansky "Master's Edge", simply because it holds an extremely consistent
angle AND you simply rotate the ceramic rods (I do them after five passes), as you
sharpen the knife.

https://lansky.com/products/masters-edge/
(Amazon has them for $25 less)
 

Mobuck

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I used to spend hours sharpening knives back when I had hours of time sitting in an office chair watching traffic pass. After retiring, I found that I no longer had that much time and switched to the "pull through the V" metal removers with a follow up on an old strop. Usually about 2 minutes gets me a usable edge and I'm ready to cut.
 

toysoldier

Hunter
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Hutchinson, KS USA
The electric sharpener you find on some can openers uses relatively coarse stones, and will grind away knives rapidly. I use a two-sided stone (no idea of grit) then finish and maintain the edge with a steel or unglazed ceramic rod.
 
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Thanks, yes, the stone I’m using does have some wear, but ultimately not that much. I’ll look at it more closely. In culinary school, I had a Japanese teacher, he was really into custom kitchen knives and taught me how to use a flat stone. I feel I can keep a consistent angle from years of practice.

I remember one particular time, after school, he stayed and helped me. He turned away for a quick second, just enough for me to cut my thumb. He couldn’t believe it and just shook his head and told me to quit for the day. It was a tough school. :D

And NO! My God, I’d never subject a knife to the sharpener on the back of a can opener. I use the electric sharpener on store bought kitchen knives just for speed. It’s the Chef’s Choice Trizor. It holds the knives at a 15 degree angle. This is the angle for those razor thin Asian knives. I have some custom kitchen knives but they get hand sharpened on the stone.
 
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Bull Barrel said:
Those can opener grinders seem to do the sides of the blades more than the edge.
Mom used em all the time and those knives had grinding marks half way up the sides and were still dull.

Same at our house growing up, was yours green? I didn't even know you could still buy electric can openers.

And Pat...ya got me looking at a Lansky knife sharpener. I'd never been to their website before. They have some neat stuff.
 

Achigan

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I went to a Work Sharp. I'm sharpening challenged and have found this to be the best for me.
For my broadheads for hunting, I use three blades that sharpen well a on a flat diamond block with four different grits. I've found light, very light, pressure in terms final stages to be key to a razor edge.
 

Bob Wright

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I have one of those three sided wood blocks with Arkansas oil stones mounted on each face, coarse, medium, and fine. And I have one of those black surgical stones mounted separately. The black is for a really, really, fine edge.

And, I have found Hoppe's No. 9 to make a good sharpening lubricant.

I keep a cheap folding knife in my desk drawer for a letter opener and use one of those ceramic rods sharpeners that place the two rods in a "vee" position. This does well for a letter opener.

Bob Wright
 

Pat-inCO

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Kevin said:
And Pat...ya got me looking at a Lansky knife sharpener.
I'd never been to their website before.
They have some neat stuff.
Yes they do. I also have a set of their 3 stone systems, but you spend about half
of your time setting up to sharpen. That's why I went to the "Master's Edge". :wink:
 

tinman

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Been using a Spyderco Sharpmaker for many years. Keeps a very good edge with low wear on the blades. Shopping around will find you a better price than the one shown.

https://www.spyderco.com/catalog/details.php?product=77
 
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Big Old Boy said:
You will be amazed at how a leather strop can finish a sharp knife.


And how it can bring a previously sharpened edge back to razor sharpness without any further stoning.

A few licks on the strop, and it's renewed. Then when I do have to dress out a nick or otherwise dull edge, I have the most wonderful stone, and I don't even know what it is.

It looks like an Arkansas translucent stone, but the wooden box it lives in only says GERMANY.
 

NikA

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I use the Smith's sharpening kit. Easy to setup and maintain the correct angle. I usually just use the coarse diamond and do a final pass with the fine diamond and serration tools. Of course, the knife that I sharpen most often is my pocket knife and it's M390 which is supposedly hard to sharpen, so YMMV.
 

jgt

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I have never been good at sharpening knives. I found that different angles work for different knife uses. A knife I use for cutting things like string, rope, cardboard, or general pocket knife uses can be sharpened at a different angle than one for kitchen use. I use the Spiderco triangle ceramic medium and fine sticks in the V block for kitchen knives like a chef's knife or carving knife. For pocket knives and paring knives and some hunting knives I use the Worksharp "field" sharpening tool. I also had a wooden fixture made to hold the diamond impregnated steel sharpeners at the same angle as the Spiderco V block. In it I use two course, two medium, and two fine steel sharping "stones". I also have two extra fine Arkansas stones for work on things needing to be razor sharp. These are relatively expensive so I accumulated the pieces to the puzzle over time. I keep all my knives sharp but I am still not good at it. I just do them often to keep the edge tuned up. I tried one of the Worksharp belt sanding sharpeners but was not good with it because even with the cheezy guide I had little success. I also tried the double ended bench grinder with the appropriate paper wheel on one end and buffing wheel on the other. That was more freehand. I never mastered that one. I find that cheap knives are extremely hard to sharpen and will not hold an edge even sitting in a drawer unused. I have some extremely good hunting knives, my pocket knives come from Boker, case, and buck. My kitchen knives are a combination of Cold steel and an unmarked set from Japan that was a gift. The jap knives do hold an edge for some reason so I guess they were made of decent quality. I don't know if you have to replace Arkansas stones when they are not flat anymore, but if mine get that way I plan to contact the supplier and see if they have a resurface plan that would true the stone back to flat. I know some tools can be reground to maintain their original intended use. Seems like whet stones could be.
 
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