I've taken a hit, credit card wise........

Help Support Ruger Forum:

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
6,296
Location
Memphis, TN USA
Last Sunday when I came home from church there were two messages on my answering machine. They claimed to be from my bank's security department, and some questionable activity had occurred on my credit card, and to call a number given for verification. I didn't recognize the number and did not answer the call. Monday was a holiday and banks were closed. Yesterday I went to my bank to investigate the calls. The clerk there got into my account and did find about $600 worth of bogus charges made that day.

The first step on their part (not the clerk with whom I was dealing) was to accuse me of letting one of my children use my card, then maybe my wife had used it without telling me, or maybe I had loaned it out? None of these were true, of course. The charges were to an business known as "Go Puff", and "Door Dash" and "Lyft," none of which I've ever used. And in all the time I've had that card, never used.

So now a fraud investigation has been initiated, that card blocked, and a new one being FedEx'ed to me.

So now I am not liable for those charges.

I'm a mite galled at the suggestions of my carelessness about my card. The lady with whom I was dealing was very emphatic to them that I was a long standing, upright customer.

Bob Wright
 

wwb

Hunter
Joined
Nov 18, 2004
Messages
2,789
Location
wisconsin
The good thing about credit cards is that you're not liable for fraudulent charges.

On a humorous note, a guy was telling his friend that his wife's card had been stolen.
"Have you reported it?" asked the friend.
"No way" replied the guy. "The thief is spending less than my wife did."
 
Joined
Mar 24, 2002
Messages
5,461
Location
Oregon City, Oregon
This type of activity is now so common, the banks will stretch accusations against the victim, hoping the victim will back down and pay.

Very recently, my boy got an overdue notice from a bank he's never had dealings with. He talked to their phone center, and was escalated up thru higher and higher managers, all accusing him of trying to cheat the bank. Finally, and the only reason he was expunged of these fraudulent charges, he was able to prove to them, electronically, he was never anywhere near the state where the account was opened. They did provide a letter of proof that he owed NO MONEY, but his credit report still indicates he is overdue on this charge. :?

This kind of thievery, any kind of thievery, causes my blood to boil.
 
Joined
Dec 3, 2021
Messages
236
Location
Georgia
I had a guy, a jackass, that I no longer will have any dealings with what so ever, ask me to let him have my AMX card for a few hours before I reported it lost or stolen. In turn he would purchase things that I wanted along with the stuff he planned on buying. He made the comment he had done this type of stuff before. I told him I thought he was noting but a low life thief and I should turn him in to the local police. I think this kind of stuff happens more often than we'd like to think. This may be why the banks and card company take the approach they do in the beginning of a claim. You have a right to be galled, and I'm sure you responded to this much more nicely than most of us would have. I'd have been in my banker face big time.
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2007
Messages
7,837
Location
Dallas, TX
Interesting, we've had our card number stolen and used many times over the past few years. Not so much now that my wife isn't travelling as much, but it still happens. In all the times it's been stolen, we've never had the credit card company ask if my wife or I perhaps bought something without the other's knowledge or try to "blame" us in any way. Most of the times the purchases were outside our normal use of the card.

Bob: The credit card company does work 24/7 so in the future, if (or more likely when) this happens again, just call them right away. They can also look very easily if you've ever used these companies before on your past history. That should tell them enough about whether or not your wife used Lyft without your knowledge.
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
6,296
Location
Memphis, TN USA
Kevin said:
Bob: The credit card company does work 24/7 so in the future, if (or more likely when) this happens again, just call them right away. They can also look very easily if you've ever used these companies before on your past history. That should tell them enough about whether or not your wife used Lyft without your knowledge.

I didn't respond right away because the number given was unfamiliar to me. I suspected a Spam call. I have heard of folks being billed huge amounts of money just by responding to a phone number. And Monday was a bank holiday so had to wait until Tuesday to talk to a real person face-to-face.

Bob Wright
 

Cholo

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Dec 30, 2008
Messages
5,969
Location
Georgia
Today I got a text from my CC's fraud division about a suspicious charge of $32.92. When I got home I didn't recognize the merchant or that amount. Previously: This morning I got a text from "Verizon" about blah blah blah offer and I bit for all of $18. Apparently that wasn't really Verizon.

I've had fraudulent charges on my CC before. Last summer I was out of town. When I came home there was a charge for a very popular streaming service--$15. I didn't order it and called my CC company. They told me that they'd just flagged 8 other purchases that were suspicious, the streaming service not being one of them.

Now my CC has been cancelled until I get the new one tomorrow or Friday. Then I have to notify every service I have on Auto Pay, AND change every single website I order from who has my CC info saved :x

I've never been given a hard time about fraudulent charges. If my CC was issued thru my local bank and they gave me some grief? Bye!
 

Dan in MI

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Aug 9, 2003
Messages
2,843
Location
Davisburg, MI. USA
I got a call from my CC company a month or so ago about possible fraudulent charges. They asked those questions also, but it sounded like boilerplate questions. They did ask more than once about the charges too. Pretty easy to deny getting carryout in SC twice when I haven't left Michigan in two years.

Regarding calling back - no, don't call back. Call the number on your card. As stated, they are always there.
 

blammer

Single-Sixer
Joined
Oct 6, 2007
Messages
230
Location
Nebraska
Like Dan in MI said. never call the number they give you: call the number on your card.

If your card has email and text notifications available, I'd get them started. Especially useful for alerting you when credit card was not present at transaction (no matter how much money) and charges over limit you set. With Discover Card you can instantly freeze the card via a mobile app or the web. Then you could call the number on the back of the card and close or unfreeze the card.

Another reason to have more than one credit card. While traveling, we've had some cards shut down for suspicious activity. So it was good to have another card. In one case, a number of years ago, we were out of our home state. I went shopping with son-in-law for hardware while wife and daughter went to do major replenishment grocery shopping at a WalMart. Big charges (legitimate) for both, so Discover froze the card and called. Wife had to pay with another card while mine went through (maybe because it was first). Got phone alerts, called card number on back and told them the charges were ok so card got unfrozen quickly. The wife's charge was just cancelled by Walmart when she paid for purchase with the other card.

Just be real careful with DEBIT cards. One of the good things government did was pass the law not making you pay for unauthorized charges on CREDIT card (there used to be notification rules you had to do, but anymore they've never made me do them and now usually just contact me). DEBIT cards I don't think are covered under those laws. There may be other laws I don't know about and I think banks have pretty much covered charges you did not make. However, just last summer, my neighbor had her Debit card number stolen and the thieves charged a bunch of stuff that immediately came out of her bank account. She had to file a police report and eventually got her money back, but it took a few days to get it.
 

RSIno1

Hunter
Joined
Sep 17, 2013
Messages
2,293
Location
Southern California
wwb said:
The good thing about credit cards is that you're not liable for fraudulent charges.

True. But we all get to share in paying for the stuff the thief got. They just spread their losses over their whole customer base in the form of higher fees and reduced interest rates.
 

AJGUNNER

Hunter
Joined
Jan 15, 2007
Messages
2,157
Location
The Sticks---N.W. Orygun
I had my card locked one time as I was checking into a hotel. I had used it for breakfast at the Portland airport, rented a car in Salt Lake City Utah, bought lunch in Wendover Nevada, bought gas in Twin Falls Idaho, then tried to check in at the hotel in Twin Falls. Guess they could not see the pattern of a traveling salesman. Kinda strange because I had done this trip almost monthly for over 4 years. A quick phone call in which they verified that I had also bought the plane ticket a week prior, and I was good to go. Better safe than sorry---I hate getting a new card number and having to go through all the changes on all sorts of web sites.
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
7,337
Location
missouri
I just received notice that my 7 week old 'charge dispute' over a double charge by Home Depot has been 'resolved in my favor' (no kidding, a very obvious double charge was turned into a 'dispute'). Discover was fairly cooperative and placed the extra charge in suspense until the correction was completed.
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2002
Messages
7,853
Location
Ohio , U.S.A.
any ruger said:
Why aren't the banks and cc companies doing more to more secure? I hate to admit it but never had these problems before computers. And cell phones.



spot on, and thats the whole trouble,,,oh well join the group even happened to both of us, no matter how hard you try and cover yourself, and be careful....... :roll: 8) :?
 

Mega Twin

Blackhawk
Joined
Jan 15, 2007
Messages
708
Location
Trumann, ar. usa
I had a double charge on my debit card at a gas station.
I had gotten some lawn mower gas for $14 and got a call from the security co.who flagged it.The guy told me it was pretty common for thieves to duplicate a charge to see if it will go through and the amount won't ring a bell with you because of the amount.
I later got a notice from the card monitoring co. that that card number had shown up on the dark web.
Thanks to the banks security people who caught it I was out nothing.
 

RonT

Buckeye
Joined
Mar 22, 2006
Messages
1,163
Location
Deep in the Arkansas woods
When my card was used by a crook, the card company sent me an email. I didn't respond to the email but called the number on the card. They caught the crook and I was sent a document to sign that I did not make or authorized someone else to make those charges. I hope the SOB did time in a room with stripped sunlight.
Federal law states that the limit you can be charged for fraudulent charges on a credit card is $50. Most companies waive the $50 and you are not liable for any fraudulent charges.
 

Jimbo357mag

Hawkeye
Joined
Feb 22, 2007
Messages
10,185
Location
So. Florida
My Capital One card has stopped fraudulent charges on my card twice. They usually send me a text message. They also changed my card (PITA) but you got to be safe.
 

RSIno1

Hunter
Joined
Sep 17, 2013
Messages
2,293
Location
Southern California
any ruger said:
Why aren't the banks and cc companies doing more to more secure? .......
People will pay by the easiest method available. If they make them too hard to use with various security methods such as pin #s or having the cashier check ID etc people will not use them and their profits will go down.
 

hittman

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jan 16, 2008
Messages
9,922
Location
Illinois
Seems like the only “hit” Bob took was to his pride when the bank teller made some accusations.

The system apparently worked as designed with the fraud being caught and the customer (Bob) being out a minor inconvenience of waiting for a new card but not losing any money.

Lenders are following internal safeguards and legal requirements set by Congress and others. When or if things get locked down tighter, the consumer then thinks the banks are playing “big brother” and somehow trampling their constitutional right to use their credit/debit card (spend their own money) when, where and how they like.
 

Latest posts

Top