Interesting Statistics and an Alzheimer's Test

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Joined
Sep 1, 2003
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Location
Richmond Texas USA
Interesting and I passed the whatever it is called test. :D

Earth's Population Statistics in Perspective

The population of Earth is around 7.8 Billion.
For most people, it is a large figure
However, if you condensed 7.8 billion into 100 persons, and then into various percentage statistics
the resulting analysis is relatively much easier to comprehend.

Out of 100:

11 are in Europe
5 are in North America
9 are in South America
15 are in Africa
60 are in Asia

49 live in the countryside
51 live in cities

12 speak Chinese
5 speak Spanish
5 speak English
3 speak Arabic
3 speak Hindi
3 speak Bengali
3 speak Portuguese
2 speak Russian
2 speak Japanese
62 speak their own language.

77 have their own dwellings.
23 have no place to live.

21 are over-nourished.
63 can eat full.
15 are under-nourished
1 ate the last meal but did not make it to the next meal.

The daily cost of living for 48 is less than 2 USD (US Dollars).

87 have clean drinking water
13 either lack clean drinking water or have a water source that is polluted.

75 have mobile phones
25 do not.

30 have internet access
70 do not have the availability to go online

7 received university education
93 did not attend college.

83 can read
17 are illiterate.

33 are Christians
22 are Muslims
14 are Hindus
7 are Buddhists
12 are other religions
12 have no religious beliefs.

26 live less than 14 years
66 died between 15 - 64 years of age
8 are over 65 years old.

If you have your own home,
Eat full meals & drink clean water,
Have a mobile phone,
Can surf the internet, and
have gone to college,
You are in the miniscule, privileged lot.
(in the less than 7% category)

Amongst 100 persons in the world, only 8 live or exceed the age of 65.

If you are over 65 years old,
be content & grateful. Cherish life, grasp the moment.

If you did not leave this world before the age of 64 like the 92 persons who have gone before you, you are already the blessed amongst mankind.

Take good care of your own health.
Cherish every remaining moment.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you think you are suffering memory loss.......

Anosognosia
Very interesting...

In the following analysis the French Professor Bruno Dubois Director of the Institute of Memory and Alzheimer's Disease (IMMA) at La Pitié-Salpêtrière - Paris Hospitals / addresses the subject in a rather reassuring way:

"If anyone is aware of their memory problems, they do not have Alzheimer's."

1. forget the names of families.
2. do not remember where I put some things.

It often happens in people 60 years and older that they complain that they lack memory.
"The information is always in the brain, it is the "processor" that is lacking."

This is "Anosognosia" or temporary forgetfulness.

Half of people 60 and older have some symptoms that are due to age rather than disease.
The most common cases are:
- forgetting the name of a person,
- going to a room in the house and not remembering why we were going there,
- a blank memory for a movie title or actor, an actress,
- a waste of time searching where we left our glasses or keys ..
After 60 years most people have such a difficulty, which indicates that it is not a disease but rather a
characteristic due to the passage of years ..

Many people are concerned about these oversights hence the importance of the following statement:
"Those who are conscious of being forgetful have no serious problem of memory."
"Those who suffer from a memory illness or Alzheimer's, are not aware of what is happening."

Professor Bruno Dubois, Director of IMMA, reassures the majority of people concerned about their oversights:

"The more we complain about memory loss, the less likely we are to suffer from memory sickness."

Now for a little neurological test:
Only use your eyes!

1- Find the C in the table below!

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

2- If you have already found the C, then find the 6 in the table below.

99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
69999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999

3- Now find the N in the table below.
Attention, it's a little more difficult!


MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMNMM
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM


If you pass these three tests without problem:
- you can cancel your annual visit to the neurologist.
- your brain is in perfect shape!
- you are far from having any relationship with Alzheimer's.

So, share this with your over-55 friends, it can reassure them.
 
Joined
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About the population: I wonder if all those numbers are true? Most sound plausible, but some I’m skeptical of. Like 62 people speak their own language. Or 87 have clean drinking water. That sounds high to me, I bet fewer people have clean drinking water.

And there’s more that seem off one way or another. Well, like the internet access, I don’t think that is accurate. More than 30 % of the people have internet access across the globe.
 

vito

Hunter
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Northern Illinois
After working with victims of Alzheimer's Disease for over 20 years, I would disagree with one of the professor's statements. Sometimes people in the early stages of the disease are aware, and often quite disturbed by the loss of memory, often relative to locations that were quite familiar and now seem confusing. Just being aware of the problem is no guarantee that the problem is not Alzheimer's. I would agree that as time passes and the disease progresses, the patient becomes less and less aware of what they have lost, and usually not at all concerned.

One fact that should be reassuring to many here, is that when you cannot remember something you were sure you knew, such as the name of some movie star that you can picture or the name of your second grade teacher, or what your cousin's birthday is, etc and become concerned that this is the first step in the progression of Alzheimer's, but the information later pops into your head an hour, a day or a week later, you can be sure it is NOT Alzheimer's. Memories lost to Alzheimer's are truly lost and are not regained. Forgetfulness and later recall of the information seems to be just a normal part of aging and nothing to be concerned about.

But I remind anyone reading this that while I worked with the elderly and those with dementia I am not a physician nor am I making a diagnosis for anyone.
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
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Messages
7,356
Location
missouri
WOW, I'm one of the privileged 7% and it took less than 5-6 seconds to find the letters(one fast scan through the display). BUT, I still can't find the tools I laid down yesterday.
 

ptypegreen

Bearcat
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Messages
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Location
South Carolina
If you forget where you parked your car, you probably have a bad memory. If you forget you own a car, it is probably alzheimers. Or so I've been told.
 
Joined
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Messages
5,391
Location
Richmond Texas USA
Many years ago I was leading a design group for an offshore platform project. One of the guys that was working for me and I got into a heated discussion on how something should be designed. Well Dewey got upset and decided to go home for the day. About ten minutes later he came back in grinning and went to his desk.
I went to him and asked if he was OK since I thought he was going home. He told me "I was but after walking around the parking lot I couldn't find my car because I forgot the wife brought me today." So don't give me anymore CRAP. We both had a big laugh
Most of us at this company had worked and played together for 25 years so this disagreement was no big deal.
 

Igor

Single-Sixer
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Messages
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Location
Lake Stevens, WA, USA
I went grocery shopping the other day, and came out into the parking lot with my cart full of groceries. I wandered around for probably 2-3 minutes, looking for my truck. I was starting to really get worried, and then I remembered that I had driven my wife's car to the grocery store. Had to laugh at myself over that one.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Webster, MD.
The lost car brings back a memory. Many years ago I parked my car at the Annapolis mall and went inside. When finished shopping I walked outside and knew that I had parked just a couple parking spaces from the door. No car. I searched and yep, no car. I went back in to call the wife and the police when I realized that the door I left from wasn't the one I had entered through. Found the correct door went out and WOW, there was my car.
 

Pat-inCO

Hawkeye
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
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Location
In the AZ oven (Phoenix basin)
Wyandot Jim said:
83 can read
17 are illiterate.
At least in the US, of that 83, my guess is that 30 to 40 of the 83 are actually
functional illiterates. Just watch how many people, reading, are mouthing the
words.

THEN there are the group (mostly under 25 years of age) that have involuntary
movement of their thumbs as they read. :roll:

:D
 

Jeepnik

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 16, 2005
Messages
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Location
On the beach and in the hills
ptypegreen said:
If you forget where you parked your car, you probably have a bad memory. If you forget you own a car, it is probably alzheimers. Or so I've been told.

My memory is perfect. By the way, what’s a car?

Seriously, as one dealing with so diagnosed with dementia a sense of humor, especially in the early stages helps. It can’t be stopped. It can be slowed a bit. But, the eventual outcome is not in doubt. Barring a medical breakthrough that is.
 

rugerguy211

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 15, 2013
Messages
401
vito said:
After working with victims of Alzheimer's Disease for over 20 years, I would disagree with one of the professor's statements. Sometimes people in the early stages of the disease are aware, and often quite disturbed by the loss of memory, often relative to locations that were quite familiar and now seem confusing. Just being aware of the problem is no guarantee that the problem is not Alzheimer's. I would agree that as time passes and the disease progresses, the patient becomes less and less aware of what they have lost, and usually not at all concerned.
.......

But I remind anyone reading this that while I worked with the elderly and those with dementia I am not a physician nor am I making a diagnosis for anyone.

I'm glad you wrote this from your experience. I share the same opinion. While I have been fortunate to have only known a handful of friends/family with Alzheimer's, in each case they were aware of their memory loss in the early stages. Also in each case that realization came months prior to diagnosis. It was almost a blessing when the disease progressed to the point where they were no longer tortured with the knowledge of how their life would change and ultimately end.
 

Rick Courtright

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 10, 2002
Messages
7,877
Location
Redlands CA USA
Hi,

According to the "test" I'm doing just fine. Picked out the "targets" almost instantly.

Now if I can just talk with the gremlins who hide stuff around here and get them to slow it down a bit, life would be great!

Rick C
 

redhawker

Buckeye
Joined
May 23, 2009
Messages
1,460
Location
Orange County,CA
"7 received university education
93 did not attend college."

With what is coming out of universities nowadays I think we should be trying to reduce that 7 significantly.
 

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