Interested in reloading

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Maddy345

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 24, 2007
Messages
4
Location
Wilmington, NC
I have never even seen anyone reload ammo in my life let alone attempted it myself. I know this is a hard question to answer but can anyone give me a general idea of how much it will cost to get into reloading .45 ACP? Can you recommend any websites that might give a basic overview of "How to"?
 

jengel

Bearcat
Joined
Mar 20, 2006
Messages
33
Location
Atwood, KS USA
It depends on if you have the money to buy all new stuff or not. I would think that you could buy a used RCBS or similar single stage press and used dies for under $50 or so. Bullets are getting expensive. If you went used, you could probably get equipment and cast bullets, 1lb of powder, primers and other stuff for under $100. Anymore, if you don't shoot much, reloading is more of a hobby than a cost saving venture.
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
11,394
Location
Kentucky
At the last gunshow I attended I could have picked up a COMPLETE used reloading outfit, including press, dies, powder scale & measure, manual, and a bunch of miscellaneous peripherals for $150. It also included a couple hundred used brass, some bullets, and powder and primers . . . and a holster.

At the same show I saw a used RCBS Rock Chucker press for $75. Looked like new.

If you are willing to shop, and know what you're after, it can be done relatively inexpensively.

If you're semi-serious, buy a couple of reloading manuals and read up to get an idea of what's involved. Manuals published by bullet manufacturers tend to have more extensive load data than those put out by powder makers, but have essentially the same "how-to" information.

Good luck.

:D
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
22,083
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
Too bad you aren't near the other end of the state, I'd help ya!
First thing you need to do is buy a reloading manuel. Hornady has a great one.
The first part of the manuel will have all the basic info on how to reload correctly and safely. Use that as a guide to learn how.
Cost; As you see, most of the info above suggests a single-stage press to learn on. That is excellent advice and highly recommended. If you get a RCBS master reloading starter kit, new, with one set of dies, you'll spend around $250 or so. If you take care of it, it'll outlast you, and will pay for itself if you load a lot.
I load about 10,000 to 15,000 rounds of 45 acp annually, but I use a progressive press for the volume. I own 3 progressive presses, and 2 RCBS Rock Chucker single-stage presses. I use them all. Once you learn the basics, and are comfortable, you might find you'd like a progressive press. HOWEVER, learn the methods first, and the best place to start is a good loading manuel.
 

Cherokee

Single-Sixer
Joined
May 21, 2003
Messages
472
Location
Medina, Ohio, USA
Like already said, get yourself a reloading manual. I like Lyman but all will have instructions. You might ask around your shooting buddies and see if anyone reloads. Tip off is they are not using factory boxes for their ammo. Might see what the local gun shop has to say, if they carry reloading supplies.
 

Maddy345

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 24, 2007
Messages
4
Location
Wilmington, NC
Thanks to everyone here for the great advice! I am getting online now to look for a manual. This is why I love this place. What a wealth of knowledge we have here!! Thank you again!!!
 

Cary

Single-Sixer
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
113
Location
Boise, ID
Maddy345":2s66mgm6 said:
I have never even seen anyone reload ammo in my life let alone attempted it myself. I know this is a hard question to answer but can anyone give me a general idea of how much it will cost to get into reloading .45 ACP? Can you recommend any websites that might give a basic overview of "How to"?
Maddy,
Here are a couple of links to some information on reloading. Here is the Lee site which has some short clips you can watch.
http://www.leeprecision.com/html/HelpVideos/video.html
The RCBS site has some information as well.
http://www.rcbs.com/guide/stepbystep.aspx
It looks like the RCBS site is stepping through the loading of rifle rounds but a lot of the information will apply to pistol rounds as well.
I started loading pistol rounds 10 years ago using one of the Lee three hole turret presses kits. I still use the same press to load 357 Mag, 30-30 Winchester, and 45-70 Government. I decided on Lee because of the price as at the time I wasn't able to spend a lot on reloading equipment. I know some people will not buy Lee products for various reasons but they have worked out good for me. You have to work within your budget or you will have problems. I am now at the place where I could buy any reloading equipment I want but the Lee set up works for me and I'm sticking with it.
Lee has just redesigned one of their single stage presses and it has some nice features for the money. Here is a link and if you go down on the page they have a good product review on the press as well.
http://www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog ... tml#breech
The other guys here have given you some good advice and ideas to think on as well. This site and others have some good people that are willing to help you get started if you decide to take the plunge. I started at the same place you are 10 years ago and with the help of sites like this and the people that frequent them I have come a long ways. I now reload and cast my own bullets. It has become a very enjoyable hobby for me.
Cary
 

Pal Val

Buckeye
Joined
May 30, 2006
Messages
1,548
Location
S.E. PA, USA
The do-it-yourself section of the local library should have books on the matter. It's good to do a bit of reading if you don't have someone to take you through the steps. I started reloading a couple years ago, and the initial investment of about $300 has more than paid for itself.

A good place to make contacts, get information and perhaps buy equipment and materials at very reasonable prices is a gun show. I seldom walk out of one empty-handed.
 

Mr. Tree

Bearcat
Joined
Jun 28, 2006
Messages
4
Location
Cincinnati, OH
www.reload-nrma.com is the website of the National Reloaders Manufacturing Association which has excellent info, most free. If you really get into reloading as I have with loading 15 cartridges, shotshells, casting bullets, etc. you should consider buying the plans for their reloading bench. It is the finest, most sturdy bench in the world and makes a good work bench as well. I made mine some 20 years ago. Bought the required wood and hardware then had a cabinet maker saw it to specs. I fasten my presses to it with C-clamps so that they can easily be moved to more convenient locations. Good luck in your new hobby!
 

Divernhunter

Single-Sixer
Joined
Mar 4, 2004
Messages
263
Location
Denair,Ca,USA
Buy the Lyman reloading book and read it. Then you will be able to decide if you want to reload and have good instructions on how to. It also is a good book for data on many different cartridges.
 

gandog56

Bearcat
Joined
Oct 2, 2005
Messages
3
Location
Mobile, AL.
Go for it. I started abot 23 years ago with the ABC's Of Reloading and a Lyman manual, and went from there. I still got all my body parts so I must be doing it right.
 

Rick Courtright

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 10, 2002
Messages
7,897
Location
Redlands CA USA
Maddy345":ds1x3yip said:
I know this is a hard question to answer but can anyone give me a general idea of how much it will cost to get into reloading .45 ACP?

Hi,

As w/ most hobbies, you can spend as much as you want! How little is probably the more popular question.

I'd estimate $250 for an absolute bare bones outfit. That's something like the Lee Anniversary kit (about $80), one die set, a few "extras" the kits never contain, like a caliper and safety glasses, a good book or two (Lyman and Lee both have good "how do I get started" info in theirs), and enough components to get started. For top notch equipment, probably $450-$500 will get you to the same place?

I have lots of different "colors" on my loading bench, but find Lee's basic equipment is usually satisfactory for a beginning loader, or one who's not gonna be doing lots of high production runs. Some of their products can run head to head w/ any of the "big boys" and keep up just fine. For single stage equipment, it's hard to beat RCBS, both for name recognition AND their customer service, but Lyman, Hornady and Redding are also in their league for quality. (You'll probably see prices tend to run a bit higher for competing Redding equipment--I'd say they cater more to the "afficionado" market the guys who are always looking for "just a little bit better" in their ammo.) I don't think anybody in the industry today makes "bad" equipment, but each does make stuff each individual will probably just "like" better. As do others, I'm firmly stuck on the idea a beginner should start w/ single stage equipment.

Once you've learned a bit, you'll constantly find "one more thing I've just gotta have," be it a different press, dies for more calibers, etc. After a couple of years, stop adding up what you've "invested." It'll just scare you!

Also, DON'T go into reloading thinking you're gonna save tons of money! A few loaders probably do save some money overall, but most of us just end up shooting more for the same cash outlay! :D

Rick C
 

BeagleDog

Blackhawk
Joined
Sep 12, 2007
Messages
625
Location
Mesa, AZ
Cary":1cvg6u3t said:
Maddy345":1cvg6u3t said:
I have never even seen anyone reload ammo in my life let alone attempted it myself. I know this is a hard question to answer but can anyone give me a general idea of how much it will cost to get into reloading .45 ACP? Can you recommend any websites that might give a basic overview of "How to"?
Maddy,
Here are a couple of links to some information on reloading. Here is the Lee site which has some short clips you can watch.

Cary, for both myself, Maddy, and I am sure others, thanks for the links. I am one of those people who can do things well after being shown how to do it, but lack the guts just to go out and "do it".
 

BeagleDog

Blackhawk
Joined
Sep 12, 2007
Messages
625
Location
Mesa, AZ
Greebe":36sjya8m said:
There was an almost exact duplicate of this post by another member about a month ago. You should check it out. There was a lot of good info there. Here it is.

http://www.rugerforum.org/phpBB/viewtop ... 97dfcf47c5

Greebe, as I mentioned to Cary, thanks for the links. I didn't start this thread, but I'm at exactly the place Maddy is. I'll say one thing with confidence. When EVERYONE of the forum agrees, as in this case, I know I can't go wrong!
 

Greebe

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 20, 2006
Messages
313
Location
Way Up North
Here is a old picture of my reloading set up. There is a lot more stuff on it now. I have since added four more calibers to my repertoire.

REBCH1.jpg
 

Three44s

Single-Sixer
Joined
Apr 7, 2005
Messages
303
Location
The better half of Wa. State
Maddy345,

You have a bunch of new friends! We will lead you through the "stickers" and get you going!

And we will fight over how to do it! LOL! ..... so when that happens .... don't be alarmed ....... we are bunch of heavily opinionated so and so's!

It's not that there is only one right way to start up ........ there are many!

But the overarching principle that you never want to breach is safety.

And for my first suggestion ........ GET PAPER MANUALS!

Books ....... and books on books! ..... over time of course.

You can certainly start with one manual and add as you go.

As you get braver you need more books to keep your feet on the ground firmly.

You don't need super brains to handload ..... just good references and common sense!

And we will be here to confuse you!

Jump in, it's darn fine water ...... no kidding!

Three 44s
 

johndefresno

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 24, 2007
Messages
8
Location
Central California
I gotta agree with those who say READ FIRST. Reloading can have some dangers, but only if you do stuff that you are adequately warned about when you do a little reading - such as wear protective eye gear when priming, don't lick the lead bullets, have adequate ventilation, don't mix powders, stuff like that!

I read many online sites like this one, got ABC's of Reloading and some manuals. I think that Hornady is the best for beginner instruction, but the books are a relatively expensive two-voume set. Speer is also great and much cheaper.

But even before I bought several books, I found tons of great stuff online by Googling "Reloading Beginners" and phrases like that. You will be able to quickly pick out the hotshots from those who know what they are talking about; and blog sites like this one quickly correct any wild claims or dangerous advice.

I started like many, with an RCBS Rockchucker, and now have three presses with a few thousand rounds behind me - it's a wonderful past-time, but demands some research before you start putting together explosive mixtures into little bombs that you hold in your hand! Having said that, with a little reading and using attention to detail, reloading is a safe, wonderful hobby.
 

winchester243

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
12
Location
Montana
I started the same way, no one to show me and had to learn it from a book. I'm sure I still got lots to learn but I am able to reload quality ammo, safely.

To me the both the Lymans #48 and Speer #13 were invaluable learning tools.

As far as the cost, the sky is the limit. :lol: I've spent a crap load on stuff and I keep buying more. It's a sickness I tell you.
 

big boomer

Bearcat
Joined
Jan 8, 2008
Messages
1
Location
minn.
Are you going to load anything other than 45? for a modest amount of loading a C press,dies,reloading manual,powder scale, and shell components are what you need a book on reloading for beginners is also a great Idea. I have been loading for 36 yrs. and still read all I can about the subject. If you plan to load allot of shells(500 or more at a time) you may want a dillon they make one for handguns only and it comes set up ready to load in the cal. you choose and you can change it over for any other standard cal. with new dies etc. I have the Dillon 550 which lets me load pistol or rifle and I have extra tool heads so its set up for a dozen different cal. with a quick switch. But this gets spendy I have about a grand in equipment. Also reload cast bullets and your gun will last longer, you'll save money, and you buy in bulk(400 to 500 in a box) I like lazercast they have silver in them they don't lead your barrel.
 

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