I just finished restoring an old bicycle for my granddaughter

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Cholo

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This bicycle belonged to my middle daughter and it was put under my house around '94. It fit under the rode hard and put away wet category. I decided to restore it for her 6 year old daughter, my granddaughter. I started 5 weeks ago and worked on it now and then in the evenings.

It's a made in USA Huffy. I considered them cheap bikes though parts of it are pretty good! The rear coaster brake is a Shimano. I stripped every bolt and bearing out of the bike because this is a restore as opposed to just getting it going. I took lots of pics of the disassembly so I could reassemble it right the first time.

First I wanted to see if I could save everything except the tubes/tires. They were so hard I had to cut them off with wire cutters and tin snips. I wanted to save the original white seat and white grips so they were the first thing I tackled. Here are the before pics.









I have lots of stuff in my garage I could have used in detailing it but decided to use better products than I had on hand. I was really concerned with being too harsh with the paint. Things I purchased:

Chain and chain breaker

WD-40 Specialist Bike Cleaner

Meguiar's Ultimate Compound

Meguiar's Deep Crystal Carnuba Wax

Finish Line bicycle bearing grease

2 white tires with tubes

I spent hours on the frame, every nook and cranny. It cleaned up well, but I didn't try to paint the scratches. 2 coats of the WD Cleaner, one use of the polishing compound, and 3 coats of the wax. Nice! I used OOOO steel wool sprayed with plain old WD-40 for the rust specs on the chromed pieces as well as every nut and bolt no matter how small. Stainless steel parts also got the compound and the wax. I didn't use the compound on the chrome.

I dug out a 25 year old container of kerosene to soak all the bearings and brake parts in. The wheel and pedal hubs were completely degreased.

Assembling the coaster brake was a PITA. I couldn't take any pics of it because it's all packed in grease. No problem. I found a schematic online. Riiight... Have you ever said to yourself: I'd better move my hand before I stick this knife in it... Ahhh! I said to myself: Maybe I should try a dry run before having my whole world covered in grease only to find it's not right. Do I listen to myself? No. I finally just figured it out, after dissembling the greasy mess.

I think it turned out really good. This wasn't about $ at all. It was for my granddaughter, who I adore❤️, to have her mother's bike. I really don't know how long it took me working now and then, but I'd guess it was about 30+ hours. I worked slowly and meticulously while listening to my favorite music.











This is the rear sprocket and hub.













I really enjoyed this project! :) I almost hate it's finished. My granddaughter's brother is 5. I also drug out my son's old 5 speed that must weigh 30 #'s! I think I'll be working on this one in the near future LOL

 

Cholo

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Thanks for all the kind words (y) I really wasn't expecting it to turn out so well. I didn't even want to tackle the paint and briefly considered stripping it and repainting. I'm glad I gave it a shot because I really wanted it original. I highly recommend the WD-40 Specialist Bike Cleaner for cleaning the grease and dirt out of the paint without being harsh. It was amazing!

Give it a shot, Snake. You've done a lot of detailed work with all the models you've built over the years. I believe those Sting Ray bikes are worth some $.

I know restoring a single speed bike with a coaster brake is beyond most people's abilities. (cough cough) Take Wyandot Jim who built an entire airplane and painted it, too. Anybody can do that.

:)
 

Cholo

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Thanks! It wasn't on Amazon Prime and I'd have to wait for it so I bought it online with Walmart. $32.51 + tax with free shipping. It's 32 ounces and I used <3 oz. LOL
 

Snake45

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Give it a shot, Snake. You've done a lot of detailed work with all the models you've built over the years. I believe those Sting Ray bikes are worth some $.

:)
This isn't one of the stupid-desirable ones like the Orange Crate with the stick shifter, just a common 5-speed. It's strawberry red. I paid $35 for it at a yard sale in the late '80s; last time I checked values on eBay, it's now easily worth 10X what I paid for it.

The white metalflake banana seat needs to be replaced. I can't decide if I want to go with white flake again, or black vinyl. It also needs a rear tire and again I can't decide between a slick and a "knobby."
 

nekvermont

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Very nice job on the bike. your granddaughter will love it and I'm sure your daughter will be very proud of you for taking on that project. I bet your granddaughter will remember that bike, forever.
 
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I fixed up an old coaster brake bike for myself many years ago. The chrome was shot so it got painted flat black. I cleaned up the spokes as best I could. I painted the entire a mix of red and some other paint I had, came out a kind of coral color. It was a heavy single speed and a bear to pedal until up to speed on a flat road. I brought it to an island in Maine. I wished I could have switched sprockets to make it easier to pedal. Later on in life, I got accepted to law school. I left our one old car with my wife as we had 2 youngsters at home. I pedaled an old English 3 speed bike from Bedford to Boston and back, 44 miles a day. I later had a 5 speed bike and later still a 10 speed bike. My experience over the 3 years is that you seldom need more than 5 speeds and can get by with 3 pretty well. I dislike the derailleur system as you need to be moving and pedaling to switch gears. Not at all safe in stop and go traffic in the city. I started law school at 205 pounds, got down to 165 pounds over the 3 years, and am back to 205 pounds again. The bike helped, but I suspect being away from the kitchen contributed just as much.
 

xtratoy

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I recently drug out my Wife's Schwinn Continental 10 speed she bought in 1972. It has been stored in outdoors sheds for many years and for the last 15 years just under cover but exposed to the elements like morning dew . The tires were shot but the cables came back to life with penetrating oil. I cleaned the green mildew off of it and it runs real good. I didn't get as detailed as Cholo did, I guess if you use collector car terminology it would be a survivor bike.
20220821_103338.jpg
 

wolfsong

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Beyond impressive!

This is why so many of us guys don't give up on old stuff. Never know when it might come in handy.

I stopped by a friend's ranch to pick up some junk he had on my way to the county dump to get rid of some of my junk. We ended up swapping some of his junk for some of my junk. Turned around and went home; never made it to the dump.
 

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