How It's Made - Wine Corks - Harvesting 50 Million Corks

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Ride1949

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That was interesting. Never thought about where cork came from. Very cool. Thanks for that

Edit: Should have said the actual cork making process. I did know about cork trees.
 
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txramfan

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I knew about trees and cork also learned that a small percentage of people taste a very specific off putting flavor caused by a fungus ( iirc) that is part of the wood used for cork.
That fungus (?) isn't easily eradicated and its one of the reasons other materials are used to seal bottles of wine.
 

eveled

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The gauges used on fuel oil tanks have a cork float. Ive seen ones that were 80 years old that still worked. The new ones still use cork. All these years still nothing better than good old cork.

As a kid I used to save corks when I found them. Good for fishing, good for holding fish hooks. I used to add a propeller and make whirly gigs with them. Amazing substance.

Anyone remember ice houses lined with cork?
 
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Colonialgirl

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When I was in the 6th Grade, My DAD was stationed in Morocco with the Navy. I learned about Corks and cork trees because there were forests of them IN MOROCCO. Didn't see the bark getting harvested, but did see the stripped trees. That would have been in 1952/53. Where did Y'all "think" corks came from?
 

KIR

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I always thought corks came from (hic) wine bottles... ;) :cool: :rolleyes:
 

Bob Wright

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During Biblical times, Israel was well known for its wines. There was a big trade in the Mediterrean area among ships carrying wine bottles made in France (the area) and cork from Spain. Ships carried the corks and bottles and finished wine throughout the area. I can't remember the name of the bottle, something like emphoria, but it had a pointed bottom and could not be set upright. This to keep the bottle laying down and keep the wine against the cork to keep it moist. There were two handles at the narrowed neck that did not protrude beyond the circumference of the bottle so it could be rotated any amount. This during the fermentation process.
 

OM41

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I enjoyed that, as kids, we discovered the oak trees growing along a drive next to the playground where I went to grade school in the 1950s had cork bark.
Google Earth shows they are still there
 

pyth0n

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When I was in the 6th Grade, My DAD was stationed in Morocco with the Navy. I learned about Corks and cork trees because there were forests of them IN MOROCCO. Didn't see the bark getting harvested, but did see the stripped trees. That would have been in 1952/53. Where did Y'all "think" corks came from?
I used to think it was compressed sawdust.
 

Ride1949

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During Biblical times, Israel was well known for its wines. There was a big trade in the Mediterrean area among ships carrying wine bottles made in France (the area) and cork from Spain. Ships carried the corks and bottles and finished wine throughout the area. I can't remember the name of the bottle, something like emphoria, but it had a pointed bottom and could not be set upright. This to keep the bottle laying down and keep the wine against the cork to keep it moist. There were two handles at the narrowed neck that did not protrude beyond the circumference of the bottle so it could be rotated any amount. This during the fermentation process.

That would be Amphora Bob.

Amphora
An amphora is a type of container with a pointed bottom and characteristic shape and size which fit tightly against each other in storage rooms and packages, tied together with rope and delivered by land or sea. The size and shape have been determined from at least as early as the Neolithic Period. Amphorae were used in vast numbers for the transport and storage of various products, both liquid and dry, but mostly for wine. They are most often ceramic, but examples in metals and other materials have been found. Versions of the amphorae were one of many shapes used in Ancient Greek vase painting. The amphora complements a vase, the pithos, which makes available capacities between one-half and two and one-half tons. In contrast, the amphora holds under a half-ton, typically less than 50 kilograms. The bodies of the two types have similar shapes.Wikipedia
Material:Ceramic, a small minority in metal, rare instances in stone or glass
Size:Small-volume container varying from table-top size to half the height of a human, able to be carried by one or more people.
Writing:Sometimes inscribed with an identifying mark, or, in the case of painted ware, the signature of the potter or artist and the names of the characters depicted in the scene.
Created:Neolithic, Bronze Age, Iron Age, Middle Ages
Discovered:The shards are ubiquitous in any type of archaeological context. The vessels were used primarily to carry wine, which was drunk by all known peoples over Eurasia from at least the Neolithic.
Present location:Circum-Mediterranean, Black Sea, Eurasia from the Atlantic to the Pacific.

amphora-7874407.jpg
 

Bob Wright

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That would be Amphora Bob.

Amphora
An amphora is a type of container with a pointed bottom and characteristic shape and size which fit tightly against each other in storage rooms and packages, tied together with rope and delivered by land or sea. The size and shape have been determined from at least as early as the Neolithic Period. Amphorae were used in vast numbers for the transport and storage of various products, both liquid and dry, but mostly for wine. They are most often ceramic, but examples in metals and other materials have been found. Versions of the amphorae were one of many shapes used in Ancient Greek vase painting. The amphora complements a vase, the pithos, which makes available capacities between one-half and two and one-half tons. In contrast, the amphora holds under a half-ton, typically less than 50 kilograms. The bodies of the two types have similar shapes.Wikipedia
Material:Ceramic, a small minority in metal, rare instances in stone or glass
Size:Small-volume container varying from table-top size to half the height of a human, able to be carried by one or more people.
Writing:Sometimes inscribed with an identifying mark, or, in the case of painted ware, the signature of the potter or artist and the names of the characters depicted in the scene.
Created:Neolithic, Bronze Age, Iron Age, Middle Ages
Discovered:The shards are ubiquitous in any type of archaeological context. The vessels were used primarily to carry wine, which was drunk by all known peoples over Eurasia from at least the Neolithic.
Present location:Circum-Mediterranean, Black Sea, Eurasia from the Atlantic to the Pacific.

View attachment 11912

Thank you for all that.

Bob Wright
 
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