Horseshoeing

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Robb Barnes

Hunter
Joined
Sep 16, 2007
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3,847
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Dallas, OR US
My guy just went to $120 for a set of new shoes with toe and heel caulks. He is not as "neat" as my last guy but Greg lost a battle with cancer so I was lucky to find Bob. I ride Copper without shoes part of the year but when we are covering a lot of ground on gravel roads getting ready for hunting season I put shoes on her. I know some folks think horses and mules can go bare hooved but like my older friend said when someone told him that "you go walk for 10-12 miles on the rocked logging roads barefoot and see how you like it!" If I expect her to take me in for miles and haul me or my animal back out, I will spend the money to put shoes on her.
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badguybuster

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
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361
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West (by GOD) Virginia
Don't farriers carry muzzles for biting horses? Although I suppose a muzzle might make a horse a little more nuts than normal.

Or how about using a twitch? Would a horse put up with that long enough to put shoes on him?
I wore a shirt or hat that said "If your horse bites me, it costs double". Never had a real bite. I had a lot of sloppy kisses though 🤣
 

outlaw_dogboy

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 2, 2005
Messages
122
Location
Maryland, USA
Barn where my daughter rides seems to only shoe horses or ponies that have an issue with their hooves. Otherwise, it seems the all mostly go bare-foot.... or whatever the term is.

Was up at the Welsh pony show in MD last week, and one of our riders' pony got angry at her and grabbed her arm in her mouth. Didn't bite down hard, didn't break the skin. Don't think it even bruised her arm. But the mare was making clear that she was angry, and wanted the showing to stop! Luckily for the pony, that was her last class of the day anyway.

I've only ever been bitten once that was intentional, and that was what someone earlier called a "sloppy kiss." That pony was known for biting, and I was warned just before it happened. But she just nibbled my shoulder. A few minutes later, she NAILED one of the other people in the barn, hard. Don't know if she was just testing me or what.
 

woodsy

Blackhawk
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Jan 5, 2012
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747
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Seymour, CT
Regarding mules: I have an intense want to ride one on a trail ride. Unfortunately none of the dozen places I visited and rode on (in seven states) ever has any available. And I'm getting older, not younger. Jeesh!
 

Jeepnik

Hawkeye
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Dec 16, 2005
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5,511
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On the beach and in the hills
I've got a cousin who's had horses since she conned her dad (baby of the family) into one as a kid. She had one that was a bit testy (as in still had his) She was saddling him and he reached around and tried to take a nip. Now mind you she was all of about 4' 8" at the time. She walked around in front of him, grabbed the halter and slapped him on the nose with her palm. Not hard, but enough to remind him who was in charge. It was a bit comical to look watch an animal hudreds of times her size take a step backwards and become compliant.
 

gundog5

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 17, 2014
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42
Location
Northern California
When I was in college I worked for a guy who had TB race horses. I saw a girl with long blond hair walking past a stall and this horse reached out and grabbed her by the hair and jerked her off her feet. The horse pulled a 2 inch chunk of her scalp out of her head. She bled like a stuck pig. Happened real fast. I am always careful around horses even my own that I know well.
 

woodsy

Blackhawk
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Messages
747
Location
Seymour, CT
I guess I should recall the story from one of my dearest friends, now long gone. He lived on a farm in the Adirondacks of NY, and his family had three boys. Father came home one day and told all that he bought a horse from a distant neighbor for a really good price. Dad added that everyone should be careful with the "new" horse until they determined how it was. First morning the oldest brother goes into the barn to groom, feed, and harness the horse. Whereupon the horse swings its head around and bites the boy enough to draw blood. Next morning the youngest brother goes to the barn to tend the horse, and is also bitten by the critter. Dad tells everyone to be even be more careful. Later that day my friend (Casey) goes to the stall and props up a 2x4 (back when they did measure 2x4). Next morning it's Casey's turn with the horse, but he knows what to expect. At the horse's side he makes a fake move to get some grain, the horse makes its move to bite, and instead gets the wood planked against its head by Casey. Never more a problem from that horse.
 
Joined
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Never was too fond of the "beat an animal into submission" method.
With some, lets call it physical correction, might work, others not much. I can tell you of a few TB mares that I referenced earlier in this thread where it would fail. You would just have about 1200 pounds of crazed wild animal on your hands. I've posted before about seeing one of them kill a 100-120 pound rottweiler, literally tore it apart like a wet paper bag.
When they get cranked up it was better for everybody to just give it up and try later, short of killing the horse you were not going to make it do what it didn't want to do.
This thread reminded me of the big deal made at the Olympics when they sent a German coach home for punching
a horse that was acting up. Pretty sure the horse didn't even notice.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Isn't it better to have an animal that likes you and is willing to take instruction instead of one that is afraid of you and just waiting for an opportunity to get even?

But, I guess some people just don't have the patience needed to work with an animal.
 
Joined
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Isn't it better to have an animal that likes you and is willing to take instruction instead of one that is afraid of you and just waiting for an opportunity to get even?

But, I guess some people just don't have the patience needed to work with an animal.
Yup, with some it's as much them training you, as you training them. A mutual learning of what each other can get away with. Horses are all
different, some are friendly and only hurt you accidently, others when scared or agitated, and I swear some are just flat mean and nasty. The only reason they get to live is they're very good at whatever equestrian event the owner participates in and somebody figures how how to handle them with out killing each other in the process.
 
Joined
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Woodbury, Tn
6 to 8 weeks? Seriously? How often do horses need new horseshoes? Why so often?
Hooves grow, and need to be retrimmed, the same shoes can be reapplied if not too worn. Plus the shoes get loose. I used to trim and reset my horses hooves/shoes. Once a year the farrier would come and straighten everything up before our 25 mile yearly ride.
gramps
 
Joined
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Horses, just like humans have had different experiences growing up, and their behavior is the sum of those good/bad experiences. You the owner, learn to deal with it. The horses I bought from my mentor, were “broke”. Brought in from the mountain where the were born and left to roam til 16 months old. Saddled up, broken bit applied. Then the old man opened up his whiskey bottle, commenced getting drunk and limbered up his black snake whip. Once the animal turned towards him he quit, blind folded the animal, and got on. He used plow rein techniques to guide the animal, then headed him towards the wall and said whoa. The animal learned to stop quickly. He had 20 colts a year to green break, and this took one day for each one.. I had three of his horses. If you told them to climb a tree they would or die trying. My ex wife and I bred these animals, but we used gentling techniques to get to the same place, and it took longer. I only had one or two a year. Ours were not broken in spirit!
gramps
 
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Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
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missouri
"Isn't it better to have an animal that likes you and is willing to take instruction instead of one that is afraid of you and just waiting for an opportunity to get even?

But, I guess some people just don't have the patience needed to work with an animal."
That's a nice thought BUT most farriers work on a per shoe basis and getting warm and fuzzy with the animals isn't very efficient. I've handled some pretty tough nags and even had to throw and tie a few down just to trim their feet. Two of the studs I handled weren't even broke to ride-just halter broke. Bite, strike, kick, or smash you against whatever solid object was close.
Dealing with someone else's training failures/mistakes can be dangerous.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,299
"Isn't it better to have an animal that likes you and is willing to take instruction instead of one that is afraid of you and just waiting for an opportunity to get even?

But, I guess some people just don't have the patience needed to work with an animal."
That's a nice thought BUT most farriers work on a per shoe basis and getting warm and fuzzy with the animals isn't very efficient. I've handled some pretty tough nags and even had to throw and tie a few down just to trim their feet. Two of the studs I handled weren't even broke to ride-just halter broke. Bite, strike, kick, or smash you against whatever solid object was close.
Dealing with someone else's training failures/mistakes can be dangerous.
Of course things are different when it's a farrier dealing with a horse. He doesn't know the horse and the horse doesn't know him. He just has to do what he does to get the job done. My comment was not meant for farriers.
 

t-reg

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 16, 2010
Messages
289
Location
MI
I had a farrier tell me once that my endurance horse needed shoes every other week, lol.
He got his walking papers.
Endurance horses have their own farrier, but I trim (and shoe if needed) the rest of the "herd".

Last weekend I had my donkey layed down and trussed up 3 ways, hind legs and head. When I went to tie a front leg to his halter to avoid being kicked while trimming, the chin strap of the halter was in his mouth. In the process of removing it, my left middle finger ended up in his mouth for an instant and he clamped down on it, wouldn't let go. No pistol on me, couldn't reach pocket knife or nippers to pry his mouth open. Only thing I could do is beat on him and wait for the crunch. Luckily I had a thick leather glove on, but it was a bloody mess. That finger is still sore, swollen and scabbed, right hand is still swollen and bruised from pounding on him. Very lucky to still have that finger.
 

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