Horseshoeing

Help Support Ruger Forum:

hittman

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jan 16, 2008
Messages
9,967
Location
Illinois
One lazy day recently I clicked on a random You Tube video showing someone shoeing a horse.

I’m hooked. :)

The channel is Idaho Horseshoeing School and its fascinating! Man oh man what a young mans job that is! Watch them trim, clean up, make a shoe, make specialty shoes to help cure problems / injuries and on and on. I don’t own a horse and never have ….. haven’t ridden one in 40 years either. Very educational though. Check it out if ya want.
 

Biggfoot44

Blackhawk
Joined
Sep 6, 2009
Messages
821
In the modern day , most working Farriers don't make their own shoes , but carry dozens ( hundreds ? ) of premade shoes in their mobile truck of various sizes , shapes , thickness , etc . They will occasionally tweak them with the hammer as needed . Other than really unusual orthopedic shoes , it's not time/ cost effective to make them from scratch .

It's the trimming of the hooves that is the critical step .
 

woodsy

Blackhawk
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
747
Location
Seymour, CT
I arrived early at the stable I frequently use to go trail riding (their horses). The farrier was there, doing his stuff. His pickup had a gas stove built right in (!). Saw him remove the old shoes, one by one, trim the hooves, reshape the new shoes to fit, nailed them on, then trimmed the new shoes to exactly blend into the hooves. All four hooves. Those guys earn their money!
 

badguybuster

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
361
Location
West (by GOD) Virginia
I was a farrier for almost 30 years (only 15 of that full time). Its very physically abusive. I had to retire after getting trampled by a Belgian mare who broke my back, collar bone, dislocated my shoulder and tore a hole in my diaphragm......good times 🙄🙄. I was also an instructor at the Oklahoma Horseshoeing School in Purcell.

Here is a Patton Bar Shoe I made for a bowed tendon.
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20200306-192014_Photos.jpg
    Screenshot_20200306-192014_Photos.jpg
    425.1 KB · Views: 35

hittman

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jan 16, 2008
Messages
9,967
Location
Illinois
One shoe they made had some sort of V shaped thingy in the middle …. Can’t remember what problem that horse had but it was interesting. Yeah, literally backbreaking work but true craftsmen.

I’m with Kevin ….. how often do they need this maintenance? How much is the cost?

Another thing I noticed was how tough hooves are. One animal had a hoof so hard he could not cut around on the inside. He used a BLOW TORCH to heat it up and make it soft enough to trim. It worked and the horse never even flinched! Guess I just don’t understand how tough the hooves are and what they’re made of. Never seen them dig deep enough to make one bleed.
 

Biggfoot44

Blackhawk
Joined
Sep 6, 2009
Messages
821
6 to 8 weeks? Seriously? How often do horses need new horseshoes? Why so often?


It all depends .

Some horses *need* shoes to reinforce certain hoof problems.

Our horses were barefoot. They were exposed to pavement or sharp rocky ground . There is a school of though that if they are exposed to surfaces that need armor , the slight flexing of the hooves promotes better circulation , and better foot health . Didn't do any harm going barefoot for all our horses , back to when Mrs Biggfoot was 13yo .

But they still required regular trimming from a good farrier .
 

badguybuster

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
361
Location
West (by GOD) Virginia
6 to 8 weeks? Seriously? How often do horses need new horseshoes? Why so often?
The 6-8 week rule is because a hoof grows about 1/3-1/2" in that time frame and as a result it will become imbalanced. In the wild, horses travep 15-20 miles a day over rough terrain which naturally exfoliates the excess hoof material. Domesticated horses eat more calori dense food and do not get the necessary friction so theif hooves overgrow rather rapidly.
 

eveled

Hunter
Joined
Apr 3, 2012
Messages
4,089
I saw one of a donkey that had a deformed hoof. Obviously way over grown and curled around. If a hoof was a hand, instead of walking on the palm it was walking on the back of the hand with the wrist completely curled over.

The farrier took xrays. Then went to work with a sawzall then an angle grinder. Then hand tools.

An hour later the animal was walking normal and a totally different animal.

This farrier was an angel of mercy that day.
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
7,356
Location
missouri
I've re-set a few loose shoes and didn't injure the horse but that's as far as I'd go. Terrible, back breaking work with a high risk of getting hurt. What I have done as a kid was stand for hours turning the handle of the coal fired forge while someone else shaped, re-shaped, and fitted shoes. If I remember correctly, the stable got horseshoes in kegs. The shoes were hung on pegs driven into the large timbers of the barn with numbers in white paint denoting size.
Later when we had 1/2 dozen 'using horses', we'd have a guy come out to shoe the ones most used on hard roads or that had some sort of foot issue. That was in the early to mid 70's and a couple years ago, I was conducting an interview with an older lady when I noticed a picture on her dining room wall. I asked who the man was and lo and behold, it was the farrier(her Brother).
He was rough and a bit 'coarse' in his shoeing but the results were utilitarian if not perfect(Dad expected the row of clinched nails to be exactly aligned).
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
1,725
Short farrier story. One of the mares I posted about above was just plain nasty all the time and the farrier that did the barn got to the point he hated to work with her and just told my sister she would have to get somebody else, he figured the horse actually knew and hated him. They had about 16 horses at the time and only a few were a problem. She found another guy to try, he's going all soft and easy with the horse and did ok the first time, they both lived through it. Came back in again maybe a couple of months later, didn't want any help ( first dumb choice ). Come up to the shop about 20 minutes later, upper right bicep all bloody and bruising rapidly. He was giving her treats and just putting her in a cross tie and she chomped on his arm....no warning, just bit him. He never came back.....did one thing smart.
I'd have killed that horse several times over the years if it was mine.
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
7,356
Location
missouri
"she chomped on his arm....no warning, just bit him."
When I was in my mid-20's the same stable where I'd cranked the forge for what seemed like days on end hired me as 'trainer'. I'd take the incoming horses and get the buck out of them and teach them some manners. I didn't really have much trouble with that but one of the studs at the place was a 'BITER'--I mean dedicated to removing whatever he got his teeth into. He put the old man who owned the business in the hospital when he bit him and tore a chunk of flesh/muscle loose.
When I handled that stud, I carried 3' of rubber hose with a piece of steel cable inside and by the time the old man got out of the hospital, that stud had a totally different outlook on life. That old man never found out what happened and maybe he thought the stud just felt bad about hurting him.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,299
Don't farriers carry muzzles for biting horses? Although I suppose a muzzle might make a horse a little more nuts than normal.

Or how about using a twitch? Would a horse put up with that long enough to put shoes on him?
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
1,725
I only got bit really hard twice. Luckily the first time was winter and the mare mostly got a heavy winter coat behind my shoulder, she still managed to slam me into a stall wall really hard before she let go. The second time was kind of my own fault, older gelding did not like people in his stall with him, always got grumpy about it. Went in with a small ladder to change a burnt out lightbulb and was too lazy to go and close the barn gates or put a halter on and cross tie him. Climbed up the ladder and got bit hard right on the side of my thigh, broke the skin in a couple of spots. I think I limped for about two weeks after that. He didn't push it, he just bit me and let go, I yelled at him and gave him a good hammer fist on the nose. I think he knew he was in trouble.
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
1,725
Don't farriers carry muzzles for biting horses? Although I suppose a muzzle might make a horse a little more nuts than normal.

Or how about using a twitch? Would a horse put up with that long enough to put shoes on him?
Helper holding a twitch on some. They can still get all pissed and wound up though, usually best to walk away and try later.
Some just don't respond well to "force".
 

gundog5

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 17, 2014
Messages
42
Location
Northern California
When I had horses here in Northern California I was paying $120.00 for shoes. I heard some show people were paying $160.00. I bet it’s more now since gas/diesel is $6.00 to $7.00 a gal. Thanks Biden.
 

Latest posts

Top