History for you Hamburger Lovers

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Gabe85

Bearcat
Joined
Jun 28, 2022
Messages
16
Location
USA
I'm getting hungry from you people, haha!
A delicious cheeseburger is unrivaled.
 

RC44Mag

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 18, 2022
Messages
608
Location
Long Island
The first mention of a hamburg steak landed in NYC from Germany long before St Louis and sold at world famous Delmonico’s Steak House in the 1870’s it was also the first steak house in the country. Then the idea moved upstate NY where it morphed then on to New Haven Ct where it was credited as the birth of the hamburger. The St Louis just made it more famous because it was during a worlds fair.
 
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Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
5,745
Location
Richmond Texas USA
The first mention of a hamburg steak landed in NYC from Germany long before St Louis and sold at world famous Delmonico’s Steak House in the 1870’s it was also the first steak house in the country. Then the idea moved upstate NY where it morphed then on to New Haven Ct where it was credited as the birth of the hamburger. The St Louis just made it more famous because it was during a worlds fair.
Now just how in the world of beef can these things be called a hamburger. Show me the Mayo, mustard, onion and pickles.
None mentioned very sad excuse for a Burger :)

1873 Delmonico's in NYC advertises a Hamburg steak on its dinner menu—the first printed menu in America—for the then-princely price of ten cents.

1885 Running out of pork, Frank and Charles Menches make do by serving a ground-beef sandwich at the Erie County Fair in Hamburg, New York. The brothers claim to have invented the hamburger, as does 15-year-old Charlie Nagreen of Seymour, Wisconsin, who delivers a similar sammie at the Outagamie County Fair that same year.

1900 Louis Lassen of Louis' Lunch in New Haven serves ground beef cooked on a vertical boiler and sandwiched between two slices of toast. A century later, the Library of Congress officially credits Louis' Lunch for selling the first hamburger in the States.

Now on to the French Fries to go with your Texas Burger

Belgian food historian Pierre Leclercq has traced the history of the french fry and asserts that "it is clear that fries are of French origin".[32] Fries are first mentioned in 1775 in a Parisian book, and the first recipe for modern French fries is in the French cookbook La cuisinière républicaine in 1795. They became an emblematic Parisian dish in the 19th century. Frédéric Krieger, a Bavarian musician, learned to cook fries at a roaster on rue Montmartre in Paris in 1842, and took the recipe to Belgium in 1844, where he would create his business Fritz and sell "la pomme de terre frite à l'instar de Paris", 'Paris-style fried potatoes'.[33][34] The modern style of fries born in Paris around 1855 is different from the domestic fried potato that existed in the 18th century.
 

RC44Mag

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 18, 2022
Messages
608
Location
Long Island
Following your modus operandi I’m surprised you don’t claim the French fries were invented by an Texan also! 😊

Things change over the years as we’re all to aware of, including the humble burger. In 50 years these will be the new norm. We won’t be around to enjoy them, thankfully.
 
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Joined
Nov 15, 2005
Messages
9,340
Location
Greenville, SC: USA
Growing up outside of a small town here in S,C. and getting most of my 'out of town education' from TV, I thought the Saturday Night Live Skit with Beushi and Akroyd about the greek burger place ... "Cheese Burger, Pepsi!" was made up until I moved here to Greenville and walked into a Pete's and told the guy at the counter what I wanted and he turned to the back and yelled.. "Cheese Burger, Coke!"
 

Johnnu2

Buckeye
Joined
Jun 26, 2003
Messages
1,965
Location
NYS
All I ever needed to sustain life has been: Hamburger, Pizza, water and oxygen.... not necessarily in that order

J.;)
 

BearBiologist

Blackhawk
Joined
Dec 4, 2021
Messages
653
Growing up outside of a small town here in S,C. and getting most of my 'out of town education' from TV, I thought the Saturday Night Live Skit with Beushi and Akroyd about the greek burger place ... "Cheese Burger, Pepsi!" was made up until I moved here to Greenville and walked into a Pete's and told the guy at the counter what I wanted and he turned to the back and yelled.. "Cheese Burger, Coke!"
And it always reminded me of Tommy's in L.A.
 

noahmercy

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 13, 2015
Messages
419
Location
Sheridan, WY
A bit of history in our town involving the humble 'burger. Louie's ancestors now own most of the hotels in this area, and they have a large "compound" just down the street from me. The town put up a statue of Louie making a burger at one of the major intersections on our historic Main Street.

 

AJGUNNER

Hunter
Joined
Jan 15, 2007
Messages
2,231
Location
The Sticks---N.W. Orygun
About 10 years ago when I did lots of air travel, I found myself in Chicago O'Hare airport hungry and with enough time to have something besides fast food. I distinctly remember this and took a picture because at the time I had never seen a $24 burger and fries. If I remember correctly the beer was $7-9 and with tip I rounded it up to $35.



Sure glad we have a local place with a great bacon double cheese burger for about $8.

 

RC44Mag

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 18, 2022
Messages
608
Location
Long Island
My all time favorite steakhouse and ‘burger joint’. In the meat packing district of Manhattan. burgers are off the charts
 

Bluefin178

Bearcat
Joined
Jan 22, 2023
Messages
25
Location
Iowa
Maid Rites in Iowa are still popular. Love to eat at them. My dad introduced me to them when I was young. They were popular in small Iowa towns. Brings back good memories!
 
Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
5,745
Location
Richmond Texas USA
In 2005 we were on Long Island to do a job for a couple of days. It was my first time to go in or eat from a REAL Deli. WOW it was great.
Texas has a BBQ Joint on just about every corner but lacking in NY style Delis which is a shame.
The above menu is a little pricey for me.:)
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2007
Messages
8,320
Location
Dallas, TX
I miss the delis we had back in Jersey as well. Or the Italian sandwich shops. Those were pretty good.

I’ve never had one but I’ve heard about NYC having a Chop Cheese sandwich. It’s just a cheese burger. But kind of like a smash burger.

I’ve tried making them at home. Mine are pretty good. Really good in fact. But I’d still love to go get an authentic Chop Cheese in New York sometime.
 

pyth0n

Buckeye
Joined
Sep 11, 2007
Messages
1,025
Location
Florida
That Maid Rite looks interesting. Kind of a Sloppy Joe without the Sloppy:)

A Texas Tradition begins in Corpus Christi
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Sponsor of Wonder Woman. Whatawoman.

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Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
5,745
Location
Richmond Texas USA
Kevin,
Next time you are in Galveston you might want to give this place a try. I saw it on the "Texas Bucket List" TV program and did some research. Rosario Maceo, who died in 2009 at age 91, took credit, in fact, for bringing the muffuletta to Galveston. They made the first ones in New Orleans. Looks like a place to try


I don't know how much of the history of Galveston, Post Office Street, and the Balinese Room you know about. Since you are building a beach house there you might want to do a little research. It is very interesting. A little about the Maceo crime Family.

If you know anything at all about the island city, you're likely to know that spice and the Maceo family go together - spice of a different sort, that is. The best-known of the Maceo brothers - Rose and Sam - were immigrants from Palermo who arrived in Galveston from New Orleans in 1910. Working initially as barbers, they got into bootlegging in the early years of Prohibition and soon discovered that peddling illegal booze was a lot more lucrative than paring whiskers and hair. In 1926, they opened the Hollywood Dinner Club and later the renowned Balinese Room. Built out over the water with the front entrance on the Seawall, the Maceos' club was known for its superb cuisine, its big-time entertainers - Guy Lombardo, Fred Astaire, Frank Sinatra and Peggy Lee, among others - and for a high-stakes casino operation that managed to defy Texas Ranger raids for three decades. Texas Attorney Gen. Will Wilson finally shut them down in 1957; by then, the Maceos had transferred most of their enterprises to Las Vegas.

The Maceos were an organized-crime syndicate, to be sure, but "they were good gangsters," a Galveston native told me a few days ago. As Robert Draper put it in Texas Monthly in 1997, "Genteel Sam and whip-smart Rose brought a glamorous cachet to the Island, kept out the Chicago mob, discouraged the residents from gambling, donated to charities great and small, and propped up the town's economy - which helps explain why many still view the wide-open era as Galveston's moment of greatest glory."
 
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ediogenes

Bearcat
Joined
May 6, 2012
Messages
33
Location
The Corner of West Texas and Old Mexico
Like all Texans, I love Whataburger, but…Nothing beats a cheeseburger basket at Roscoe’s in El Paso. The patty goes on the grill and when flipped, lettuce, tomato, and onion are added on top to sauté a bit in the juices. Three generations. You gotta get there early to get a seat for lunch. And don’t forget to “Weigh Your Fat(e)” on the old-timey penny scale that also tells your fortune.
 

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