Got it back !

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shooter65too

Bearcat
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Messages
6
Location
GA
Finally after 3 years since it was stolen and 2 1/2 years since it was recovered by the local PD, my SP-101 3" .38+P was finally returned to me in the same shape as when it was stolen.....They even returned the same 5 rounds that were in it Mag Tec 95 grain solid copper HP's :D
 

EarlFH

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 17, 2007
Messages
361
Location
Montana
Congratulations! :)
You must have a really good police dept. I've heard too many stories of having to hire a lawyer to get your gun back, and even then it ends up looking like it was run through a cement mixer. There are so many departments that just hate to give a gun back to a civilian, that they do their best to not give it back, and if they are forced to, they throw it around the parking lot for a few hours, before giving it back.

EarlFH
 

Hugh

Buckeye
Joined
May 29, 2008
Messages
1,139
Location
West Jordan, Utah
In my experience as a Property and Evidence Custodian/Officer for a law enforcement agency, when a stolen weapon is recovered from a bad guy it is most prudent to hold the recovered stolen firearm as evidence until the case is adjudicated and resolved. On one occasion the case was lost because we returned the firearm to the owner before the trial, no evidence. Then the prosecutor will clear it for return to the lawful owner. Sometimes that whole process does take a few years.

I'm happy you received your firearm back. Although I probably would not have returned the ammunition because I would have no idea that it was the actual ammunition you lost. I would have disposed of the ammunition in the appropriate manner.

On one occasion I was able to return a stolen revolver when our agency recovered it after 20 years (taken from a bad guy.)
 

robhof

Bearcat
Joined
Oct 31, 2009
Messages
5
Location
Bowling Green Ky
That's good to hear. I've heard too many stories of the bad guy using the gun in a crime and the state law requires that offending guns must be destroyed, like it's the gun's fault not the poor perp....
 

powder smoke

Hawkeye
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
6,530
Location
Milo Maine
Retrieving stolen guns came be a chore. A friend of mine had several rfles stolen from his home in Newport NH, tomake a long story short the cops found the thieves and the guns and would not return one of them cause he didn't have the serial number. The rifle in question was his fathers that was pasted down to him after he died. He did not have the serial number BUT his fathers name was engraved on the reciever guess what not good enough. Make sure you keep a record. ps.
 

Hugh

Buckeye
Joined
May 29, 2008
Messages
1,139
Location
West Jordan, Utah
powder smoke":3elmtcsk said:
Retrieving stolen guns came be a chore. A friend of mine had several rfles stolen from his home in Newport NH, tomake a long story short the cops found the thieves and the guns and would not return one of them cause he didn't have the serial number. The rifle in question was his fathers that was pasted down to him after he died. He did not have the serial number BUT his fathers name was engraved on the reciever guess what not good enough. Make sure you keep a record. ps.

I handled this kind of situation by asking the owner to provide a statement as to how they came to own the firearm, and I would ask if there were any distinguishing marks. The father's name on the firearm would be sufficient for me.
 

Hawgleg44

Bearcat
Joined
Jan 19, 2008
Messages
23
Location
People's Republic of Massachusetts
While serving a narcotics warrant one time, we confiscated about 20 firearms from the homeowner, who had not had a valid permit for almost 10 years.

When we ran the numbers, we came up with one stolen hit. It was a Winchester Canadian Centennial Commemerative .30-30, octagonal barrel, stolen from Waco, TX 10 years prior. You have to wonder how many hands that one went through to make it all the way up to MA!

It always made me feel good thinking how happy the owner was to get it back. I'm sure, especially after 10 years, he never expected to see it again.
 

CanonLyles

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 28, 2010
Messages
426
Location
Oklahoma
Hugh, it feels good to hear an honest, good person from the inside. You sound sincere and honest. Your type is rare. But, practical, common sense goes a long way with me.

shooter, I am VERY glad you got your SP101 back. I only had to wait 5 days, when I bought mine. I can only have nightmares of 3 years. Shoot an extra +P hollow points for me in your celebration. Hell, I'll send you a box, because I don't know what I would do if something like that ever happened to my grandfather's Sear's & Roebuck single shot 12 ga. or the Rem. pump .22 that I learned to shoot with. Those are family heirlooms. Enjoy.
 

protoolman

Hunter
Joined
Oct 15, 2001
Messages
2,095
Location
ND
In Montana where I spent the bulk of my career as well as North Dakota where I finished up I always returned stolen property right away if it was valuable. The rules of evidence state that a photograph as well as testimony of the officer to the serial number etc. is the same as the actual item in a theft case. PDs keeping these items for 2 years as either a victim of lazy prosecutors or poor laws governing evidence in their jurisdictions.
 
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
5
Location
PA
I had a similar problem when local law enforcement stole my pistol. I registered my Single Six Light Weight alloy cylinder, no rings or chips in the finish, per regulations. 2 days later I received a call from the department to bring all firearms and paperwork to the station, no explanation. So ok, I did nothing wrong maybe because of the number registered or question of one of the description. Showed up he needed to see three of them, a Sharps 50-70, top break Smith and Wesson, and the Single Six. He told me they were stolen and he needed to confiscate them. He showed me the report that came from his data base for the Ruger. It read, doing this from memory of 18 months ago, Make: Ruger Cal: 22 Model: std SN: (same number) Date: it was early 70s Reporting department: Toronto. I think that was it, but you get the picture. Ok too easy, translated all for him, why it is not mine, but he needed to get the police report. Understood, support law enforcement and let do their job. 2 weeks later no report yet. Long story short I contacted all police departments and received the reports faster than him. Contacted Ruger records department who was able to give me information that my Single Six was shipped in the states and a Standard Model was shipped to Canada. Also showed him that prior to 1968 manufactures could repeat serial numbers on different models. And some other minor evidence to support me like pretty pictures from the 60s showing both guns. His response… A gun can be converted without changing the serial number. To clarify I asked, a alloy revolver can converted into a steel auto loader without altering anything around the serial number. Answer is Yes. I really wanted to meet the gunsmith who can do this; still hasn’t given me their name.
Had to get a hold of his highers up to the Provost Marshal and get a JAG attorney involved. Luckly it never went to Canada and I did get the pistol back a couple of months later but it now has a ring on the cylinder and a snazzy evidence box with its information on it.
 

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