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Dave Schwaab

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 2, 2014
Messages
70
The Mustang was North American's answer when the British Purchasing Commission came asking them to build P-40 Kittyhawks for them. The original Allison engined models were very good fighters, at the lower altitudes, superior to the P-40s. Recognizing this superiority, the British tried mating a Rolls-Royce Merlin to one, then had Packard build engines under license so North American could install them into the Mustang, with the airframe being slightly redesigned forward of the firewall.

The Merlin engined Mustang went on to the great fame we remember today, but it was the Allison engined version that that showed that potential, scored the first kill and produced the first ace (who was actually flying a US A-36 dive bomber variant, operating in Italy, when he did so).

BTW, I heard the Germans installed a Daimler-Benz engine in a captured Spitfire, and found THAT aircraft to be superior to both the Spitfire and the 109!
 

Snake45

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
6,985
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+4020
Bob,
The Stuka also had auto climb that was activated on the stick and after bomb release.



Diving procedure
Ju 87 diving procedure
Flying at 4,600 m (15,100 ft), the pilot located his target through a bombsight window in the cockpit floor. The pilot moved the dive lever to the rear, limiting the "throw" of the control column.[ The dive brakes were activated automatically, the pilot set the trim tabs, reduced his throttle and closed the coolant flaps. The aircraft then rolled 180°, automatically nosing the aircraft into a dive. Red tabs protruded from the upper surfaces of the wing as a visual indicator to the pilot that, in case of a g-force induced black-out, the automatic dive recovery system would be activated. The Stuka dived at a 60–90° angle, holding a constant speed of 500–600 km/h (310–370 mph) due to dive-brake deployment, which increased the accuracy of the Ju 87's aim.

When the aircraft was reasonably close to the target, a light on the contact altimeter (an altimeter equipped with an electrical contact which triggers at a preset altitude) came on to indicate the bomb-release point, usually at a minimum height of 450 m (1,480 ft). The pilot released the bomb and initiated the automatic pull-out mechanism by depressing a knob on the control column

I gave a copy of this photo to Son. Dad brought it back from WWII
A ME-410 in action
View attachment 11443
I first saw that pic a long, long time ago (early '60s), either in Popular Science or in one of the WWII airplane books in the school library.
 

Dave Schwaab

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 2, 2014
Messages
70
The father of my best friend in highschool was a Luftwaffe pilot. His description of the 109 was one German word which likely would not pass the censor program. His "best of the best" was the FW 190.
Fighter General Adolph Galland wanted the Luftwaffe to have more Fw-190s because they gave the average pilot a better chance of getting hits with their many guns scattered about the aircraft (above the nose, in the wing-roots and in the wings, outboard of the propeller), AND he wanted Messerschmitt to concentrate on building the Me-262! The 190 was also easier to fly, and to handle on the ground because of its stronger, and wider track, landing gear.

Many "Experten" continued to prefer the 109 because the firepower was concentrated in the nose, where their skill could put more rounds on target faster.
 

Dave Schwaab

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 2, 2014
Messages
70
To give you a little more information on the little-known Allison engined early Mustangs:

The Mustang Mk I was a British only variant. It was armed with 2 .50 cal. machine guns under the nose and 1 .50 cal. and 2 .30 cal. machine guns in each wing. There were no racks under the wings for tanks or bombs. American pilot Hollis Hills, flying with RCAF Squadron No. 414, was flying one of these when he scored the Mustang's first kill. It was used similar to the P-40 Kittyhawks in an army cooperation roll, providing photo recon, scouting and ground support.

The Mustang Mk IA was the same aircraft, but armed with 4 Hispano 20mm cannons instead of the machine guns. It was also used by the USAAF, who designated it P-51, or F-6A, when fitted with cameras for photo recon. The US used it in North Africa and Italy. It was used, along with the A-36s, in the same combat units.

The A-36 "Apache" was the dive-bomber variant, used only by the USAAF, in North Africa and Italy. It was the first version of the Mustang that they used, because they originally felt they didn't need another fighter! It was armed with 2 .50 cal. machine guns under the nose and 2 more in each wing. Two 500 pound bombs were carried under the wings. They would approach their targets at low level, then climb to altitude, deploy their dive brakes, roll inverted and pull though into a vertical dive to deliver their bombs. A-36s were credited with the highest percentage of on-target delivery of any bomber. Mike Russo was flying an A-36 when he became the first Mustang ace (and ONLY A-36 ace).

The Mustang Mk II, the last of the Allison engined models was also the most widely used variant, being used by both British and US forces in both the European and Pacific Theaters. It was armed with 2 .50 cal. machine guns in each wing and a rack under each wing for bombs or drop tanks. In US use, it was designated P-51A, or F-6B, when fitted with cameras.
 
Last edited:

txramfan

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 29, 2011
Messages
250
Location
Plano
Bob,
The Stuka also had auto climb that was activated on the stick and after bomb release.



Diving procedure
Ju 87 diving procedure
Flying at 4,600 m (15,100 ft), the pilot located his target through a bombsight window in the cockpit floor. The pilot moved the dive lever to the rear, limiting the "throw" of the control column.[ The dive brakes were activated automatically, the pilot set the trim tabs, reduced his throttle and closed the coolant flaps. The aircraft then rolled 180°, automatically nosing the aircraft into a dive. Red tabs protruded from the upper surfaces of the wing as a visual indicator to the pilot that, in case of a g-force induced black-out, the automatic dive recovery system would be activated. The Stuka dived at a 60–90° angle, holding a constant speed of 500–600 km/h (310–370 mph) due to dive-brake deployment, which increased the accuracy of the Ju 87's aim.

When the aircraft was reasonably close to the target, a light on the contact altimeter (an altimeter equipped with an electrical contact which triggers at a preset altitude) came on to indicate the bomb-release point, usually at a minimum height of 450 m (1,480 ft). The pilot released the bomb and initiated the automatic pull-out mechanism by depressing a knob on the control column

I gave a copy of this photo to Son. Dad brought it back from WWII
A ME-410 in action
View attachment 11443
My dad has some photos of flak, nothing like this photo . WOW
 

g5m

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 29, 2008
Messages
180
For a time we were training Israeli, German and Iranian pilots on the Phantom at the same time. Not everyone was "allowed" to fly at the same time.
Back when the world was different and the US was training Luftwaffe pilots on some of the fighter planes the German pilots often ate at a local restaurant. I was told it was 'chilling' when they had a few beers and started singing their patriotic songs. The war wasn't but about 15 years prior and feelings were still raw. And Willy Messerschmidt made a visit to that local training base some years later.
 

HarlenAshley

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 30, 2022
Messages
10
Location
indiana
F46E4E57-CC8E-476F-BBE3-78AC5167EC3D.jpeg

A friends dad, Captain John Miller did some stunt flying for the 1969 movie Battle of Britain.
He just clears the fence as the Germans are shooting up the British airfield about 5 minutes into the movie.
I took a little artistic license and painted him in a Messerschmitt instead of one of Merlin powered Hispanos used in the movie.
 

RC44Mag

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 18, 2022
Messages
602
Location
Long Island
View attachment 11540
A friends dad, Captain John Miller did some stunt flying for the 1969 movie Battle of Britain.
He just clears the fence as the Germans are shooting up the British airfield about 5 minutes into the movie.
I took a little artistic license and painted him in a Messerschmitt instead of one of Merlin powered Hispanos used in the movie.
Very well done
 

g5m

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 29, 2008
Messages
180
Nice work!
View attachment 11540
A friends dad, Captain John Miller did some stunt flying for the 1969 movie Battle of Britain.
He just clears the fence as the Germans are shooting up the British airfield about 5 minutes into the movie.
I took a little artistic license and painted him in a Messerschmitt instead of one of Merlin powered Hispanos used in the movie.
 

g5m

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 29, 2008
Messages
180
A friend I worked with for some years grew up in Scotland. He was just a kid during the war. Every Sunday the family went to the park for a picnic and he told me that one day a German fighter- he said a Messerschmitt- came over and strafed the park. It was the only time he ever heard his father swear as he shook his fist at the plane.
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
10,769
Location
Webster, MD.
These guys made good use of the 109.

View attachment 11456

This is a great book on the Israel's Air force. Angels in the Sky; these guy's were true pilots.
Bought the book and once I started reading, couldn't put it down. Absolutely incredible stories within a story. If you are in any way interested in aviation or flying this is a "MUST READ"!
 

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