Equalizing ratchet pads on older GP-100 ejector

Help Support Ruger Forum:

My Toy

Bearcat
Joined
Jan 28, 2012
Messages
56
Location
People's Republic of Maryland
Have an older GP-100 that the cylinder wouldn't carrier up and lock on a couple of chambers. I'm fitting a new pawl and have gotten to the point where three consecutive chambers will carry up, lock and pass a range rod but the other three won't. The pawl is still to wide on these three chamber ratchet pads. I'm thinking if I stone enough off of the pawl to get the three remaining ratchet pads to work with the new pawl the first three chambers (actually their ratchet pads) will not carry the cylinder far enough to pass the range rod.
I remember reading in Kuhnhausen's shop manual on Smith and Wessons he talked about stoning unequal ratchet pads to get a Smith with unequal ratchet pads to be able to pass a range rod in all chambers.
Has anyone on this forum ever performed this on a GP-100?.
 

Carry_Up

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 22, 2007
Messages
376
Location
Dallas, TX
A GP that won't carry up on 3 cylinders is serious trouble. It might mean that there is an excessive amount of wear overall, or that someone installed incorrect or modified parts. Be very certain what you have before altering parts that are not available to you. Someone might already have altered the ratchet pads. Remember that in this system, the width of the pawl (hand) is what adjusts the amount of cylinder rotation. Wider = more rotation, which is what you need if the cylinder does not carry up. The cylinder stop should drop immediately when the trigger pull starts; and should return 1/3 to 1/2 way to the next locking groove.

It is also possible that someone installed another cylinder from a parts gun. In that case a trip to factory service for a new cylinder will be necessary.

Carry_Up
 

My Toy

Bearcat
Joined
Jan 28, 2012
Messages
56
Location
People's Republic of Maryland
Carry_Up said:
A GP that won't carry up on 3 cylinders is serious trouble. It might mean that there is an excessive amount of wear overall, or that someone installed incorrect or modified parts. Be very certain what you have before altering parts that are not available to you. Someone might already have altered the ratchet pads. Remember that in this system, the width of the pawl (hand) is what adjusts the amount of cylinder rotation. Wider = more rotation, which is what you need if the cylinder does not carry up. The cylinder stop should drop immediately when the trigger pull starts; and should return 1/3 to 1/2 way to the next locking groove.

It is also possible that someone installed another cylinder from a parts gun. In that case a trip to factory service for a new cylinder will be necessary.

Carry_Up

Thanks for the input; maybe the gun is ready for a trip to the factory.
 

hardguy-2009

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 16, 2013
Messages
6
The ratchet can be equalized, but you almost have to be a watchmaker to do it. Very carefully filing just at the right places. It's best to concentrate on one ratchet tooth until it's right and go to the next. Mark them so you know which one you are fitting. Angle is very important. It's not a job is not for the squeamish. I've done it on a Smith as per Kuhnhausen, but usually it's only one tooth that's a problem. If your going to send it back to Ruger, try it. You can't make it any more unusable.
 

98Redline

Blackhawk
Joined
Dec 9, 2010
Messages
681
Location
PA
Back to Ruger for sure.

They will probably fit a brand new cylinder with a ratchet that is in spec. Unless you are building yourself a completely custom gun with exceptionally tight tolerances, I can't see why you would invest the time in an obviously defective part right from the get-go.
 

Chuck 100 yd

Hunter
Joined
Mar 20, 2010
Messages
3,251
Location
Ridgefield WA
I agree. That one needs to go to Ruger. They may replace the cylinder and much more and I bet they charge ZERO for it. I would give them a call and politely explain the issue with it.
 

Latest posts

Top