Disassembling GP-100 problem

Help Support Ruger Forum:

Zackary1

Bearcat
Joined
Oct 18, 2014
Messages
4
My friend and I tried to disassemble his GP-100 this afternoon. He's owned it for more than a year but never had it apart. We could not get the plunger to release the trigger group, no matter how much we tried. We tried using the mainspring, various screwdrivers , even a couple of punches( just be pushing). Nothing. We sprayed it with penetrating oil. He told me he would try it again couple of days. His gun does not have a hole in the grip which i understand some GP's do to make it easier to access the plunger. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thank you
 

hittman

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jan 16, 2008
Messages
9,009
As unpopular as this may be ...... why on earth would you take it apart?

Just put it back together, clean it and shoot it.
 

recumbent

Blackhawk
Joined
Nov 2, 2005
Messages
945
First time can be a bear to get it. I use a popper tool but they are not available anymore.
After you get it apart check for burrs on the frame around the hole. One of mine had a burr making it
hard to pop.
 
Joined
Dec 8, 2005
Messages
3,545
You can make you own Ruger "Popper" tool with a screwdriver. Go here to see a picture of it from Brownells and you can see what needs to be done to the flat blade screwdriver: https://www.brownells.com/aspx/learn/learndetail.aspx?lid=10413

The other thing you can use is a metal paint can opener. You might have to modify it a bit where it contacts the pin but it should work.

If it hasn't ever been disassembled, it will be tough the first time, but if you have a "popper" to hold the pin in, then you might want to use a wood dowel rod to exert some leverage on the trigger guard to get it to come loose. Then remove the pin and spring and clean them and the hole thoroughly and check the frame for any burs or rough spots and carefully clean them up.

When putting it back together you might even have to tap on the back of the trigger guard with a rawhide or other non marking hammer to fully seat it.
 

woodsy

Blackhawk
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
724
arfmel said:
hittman said:
As unpopular as this may be ...... why on earth would you take it apart?

Just put it back together, clean it and shoot it.

Pretty good advice.
Same sentiment here. Plus, removing the trigger group requires a fair amount of care to prevent its components from popping out into no-springs-land.
 
Joined
Dec 8, 2005
Messages
3,545
woodsy said:
arfmel said:
hittman said:
As unpopular as this may be ...... why on earth would you take it apart?

Just put it back together, clean it and shoot it.

Pretty good advice.
Same sentiment here. Plus, removing the trigger group requires a fair amount of care to prevent its components from popping out into no-springs-land.

No, that's not really correct. Removing the trigger group is not a big deal and I have yet to have any of those springs launch anywhere. I have taken GP100's and the Six series guns apart hundreds of times and have never lost any of the springs and/or pins.

Why would you take it apart? To troubleshoot a malfunction, do a modification, to do a deep clean or lubrication, or to just learn how your gun functions. When I buy a used GP or Six series revolver or have a customer bring one in to the shop to have work done on it, I remove each and every piece (yes even the front sight and the ejector rod pin and spring on the Six series) before all pieces go into the ultrasonic cleaner for a thorough cleaning.

Example, I bought (in 2015) a NIB Security Six that was made in 1976. It was rarely taken out of the box and was never fired. You could barely pull the hammer back and the trigger was stiff to almost no movement due to the owner never cleaning all the grease and oil that was put on by the factory. It needed to be taken completely apart to clean out all that aged gunk.

Another time a customer brought in a GP100 that he wanted action work done and lighter springs installed. Well the trigger return spring in a GP also acts as the trigger guard lock plunger spring so of course the trigger group had to be removed. He had never had his apart and wanted to learn how to do it without screwing it up - I showed him what to do and what not to do.

There's a lot of reasons a person might need/want to take a gun they own apart. Should you take it apart without familiarizing yourself with how it is disassembled/reassembled? Nope, there are little things that you need to know/remember when you put it back together. Like moving the transfer bar back so it doesn't get caught on the frame when you put the trigger group back in or insuring the pawl is in the right place in the frame before you try to force trigger group closed.

I have learned over the years to try not to make blanket statements about things because things are not always as they seem.
 

rob-c

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 2, 2012
Messages
240
I bought a used Blackhawk, and decided to disassemble for a deep clean and was shocked how much crud was in there. After cleaning it actually smoothed out the gun.
 

JStacy

Single-Sixer
Joined
May 6, 2016
Messages
493
I use a long nosed 1/8" punch and knock the plunger back the first time . I do this to install a spring kit and after you replace the trigger return spring the plunger moves much easier if you want to remove it in the future.
 
Joined
Mar 24, 2002
Messages
5,349
I guess I'm the minority. The original Security Six and now the GP 100 were designed to be easily disassembled without tools, and doing so can be beneficial, if nothing more than to remove manufacturing debris and to distribute a little lubrication.
 
Joined
Dec 8, 2005
Messages
3,545
WAYNO said:
I guess I'm the minority. The original Security Six and now the GP 100 were designed to be easily disassembled without tools, and doing so can be beneficial, if nothing more than to remove manufacturing debris and to distribute a little lubrication.

You're not in the minority, both can be easily disassembled with a cartridge case and the mainspring strut. However, The GP100's seem to be a bit stubborn at first and get easier each time you take them apart.. That is where the "popper" makes things easier the first time out. Once apart the owner can see if it needs to have manufacturing debris removed and the internals lubricated.
 

JStacy

Single-Sixer
Joined
May 6, 2016
Messages
493
I just disassembled my new SP101 and it was very difficult to get apart. I had to depress the plunger, after a few taps with a pinch then hold the plunger in and tap the trigger guard with a small plastic mallet to dislodge the trigger group from the frame. I put in a Wilson spring kit then reassemble the trigger group tp the frame and it took a few light taps with the plastic mallet to seat the trigger group. In the future a thorough cleaning can be accomplished by capturing the hammer spring , slipping the hammer out and blowing out any crud that has collected in the trigger mechanism with a mild solvent . You can also oil as needed with the hammer out , oil the full cock notch and reassemble the gun.
 

Thel

Blackhawk
Joined
Jun 22, 2010
Messages
615
After initial disassembly I take a stone and oil to the back of the trigger plunger and mating surface in the frame to smooth up and make assembly much easier. Also, if one is worried about launching springs out of the trigger guard assembly before taking apart one can tape around the back of the trigger to the front of the trigger guard to prevent trigger movement which would not occur unless accidentally touching the trigger while apart.
 

wproct

Single-Sixer
Joined
Nov 7, 2006
Messages
238
I have owned several GP100 revolvers and have disassembled each when bought new, mainly to install lighter springs and to check the revolver for manufacturing machining debris and proper lubrication. Once having done so, I seldom if ever disassemble them again.
 

Latest posts

Top