BRASS

Help Support Ruger Forum:

graygun

Hunter
Joined
Sep 24, 2008
Messages
4,000
Related to the post to old Jarheads where BRASS is mentioned. I recall (Army basic) the first S meant "spot weld" or get thumb in contact with cheek so it does not smash into it when the round is fired.

Karl said it meant "stop".

I assume "stock weld" is the same as "spot weld".

The other post was for Marines so I probably should not have posted in it.
 

737tdi

Hunter
Joined
May 31, 2006
Messages
2,316
OK, now I am going to dig out my handbook. Remember it was 35 years ago for me (longer for some of y'all!!!). I certainly don't remember "slack" but I guess it could have been.?? Further research after I dig into my old book boxes out in the barn.

Karl
 

Chuckbuster II

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 24, 2014
Messages
269
I learned Sight rather than Slack but that was in an NRA Junior Indoor Program, not much Slack in a Rem Mod 37 Target trigger,,,
 

graygun

Hunter
Joined
Sep 24, 2008
Messages
4,000
Chuckbuster II said:
I learned Sight rather than Slack but that was in an NRA Junior Indoor Program, not much Slack in a Rem Mod 37 Target trigger,,,

I was thinking it was "sight alignment" before I recalled "spot weld" ; that sounds like "aim" except as a last moment check that the sight picture was correct. I'm confusing myself. :lol:
 

sebtool

Blackhawk
Joined
Oct 3, 2009
Messages
678
Parris Island, circa 1979, M16A2. We had slings, but no gloves, no jackets. Just recruits, hadn't earned the title of Private yet, so I could be wrong.... :wink:

IIRC:

Breath
Relax
Aim
Slowly
Squeeze

1 week of the 13 was spent at the range. That included training, practice and qualifying. I still don't care much for the AR. Must be why I have Minis! :lol:
 

picketpin

Buckeye
Joined
Jun 29, 2006
Messages
1,544
Most military triggers, especially the M14 I first trained on had 2 stage triggers. Pull in the "slack" then the final let off is crisp and light. I'm old enough that I trained with M14s even though Vietnam was in full swing. We didn't get M16s till AIT.

RWT
 

Rick Courtright

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 10, 2002
Messages
7,749
Hi,

Now you guys got me curious!

As a civilian, I was taught "stop" as Karl mentioned, by an old timer of unknown military experience. He did have a history of high level competition shooting, though, so I imagine he'd rubbed elbows with a few military shooters even if he wasn't one.

So I went surfing, and found everybody's in agreement with "Breathe, relax, aim", but then things go in different directions. "Slack", "stop", and "sight" were all mentioned on a couple of Marine forums. And another forum talking about Olympic shooters has it as "Breathe, relax, aim, squeeze, shot." Interesting.

It seems everybody's headed for the same place, but the inter-workings of "aim" meaning to attain the alignment of the sights while ignoring the target, and "slack, stop or sight" meaning to maintain that alignment as the target is added to complete the sight picture, just use different terms to say pretty much the same thing.

As for the Olympians, I got to watch some of the air rifle shooters shoot practice during the '84 LA Olympics, and they used a VERY exaggerated follow thru, just standing there "taking it all in" as it were, after the shot. So that may explain their slightly different take on both "s" sections. Unlike most sources which teach the shot should come somewhat as a "surprise" (for lack of a better term) during the squeeze process, the Olympic commentary indicated one should know exactly when it's going to happen. I dunno if that's really the case, but the guys I saw made a nervous wreck out of me just watching. They kept putting shot after shot thru the same hole (10m range), so they must have been doing something right... at least for their purposes? They'd probably all be dead on a battlefield in no time, though! :oops:

We return the range to the Marines now...

Rick C
 

GunnyGene

Hawkeye
Joined
Nov 23, 2013
Messages
6,212
Rick Courtright said:
Hi,

Now you guys got me curious!

As a civilian, I was taught "stop" as Karl mentioned, by an old timer of unknown military experience. He did have a history of high level competition shooting, though, so I imagine he'd rubbed elbows with a few military shooters even if he wasn't one.

So I went surfing, and found everybody's in agreement with "Breathe, relax, aim", but then things go in different directions. "Slack", "stop", and "sight" were all mentioned on a couple of Marine forums. And another forum talking about Olympic shooters has it as "Breathe, relax, aim, squeeze, shot." Interesting.

It seems everybody's headed for the same place, but the inter-workings of "aim" meaning to attain the alignment of the sights while ignoring the target, and "slack, stop or sight" meaning to maintain that alignment as the target is added to complete the sight picture, just use different terms to say pretty much the same thing.

As for the Olympians, I got to watch some of the air rifle shooters shoot practice during the '84 LA Olympics, and they used a VERY exaggerated follow thru, just standing there "taking it all in" as it were, after the shot. So that may explain their slightly different take on both "s" sections. Unlike most sources which teach the shot should come somewhat as a "surprise" (for lack of a better term) during the squeeze process, the Olympic commentary indicated one should know exactly when it's going to happen. I dunno if that's really the case, but the guys I saw made a nervous wreck out of me just watching. They kept putting shot after shot thru the same hole (10m range), so they must have been doing something right... at least for their purposes? They'd probably all be dead on a battlefield in no time, though! :oops:

We return the range to the Marines now...

Rick C

Another favorite that was sure to draw the ire of the Range D.I.'s was if they caught you muscling the rifle on target.

"Bone support, Maggot, Bone support" at about 200 decibels directly into your ear. :mrgreen:
 

Latest posts

Top