Brass Goes Flying

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Chuckfish

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Feb 12, 2012
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174
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The Blue Ridge
I have a Mini-14 that I'm trying real hard to fall in like with. I need to tame it down a bit as it throws brass into the next county. I reload and would like to be able to retrieve ALL the empties. Is there some kind of reasonable fix to cure this problem.
If I can't fix it it's goin down the road. I would like to fix this problem before I start to make other changes such as a barrel stabilizer. It's already sitting in a Hoague over molded stock. Any and all suggestions will be appreciated.

Regards
 

Goldstar225

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Dec 11, 2011
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292
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Central Arkansas
Replace the gas port bushing. The stock bushing is .096 or so in diameter. ASI offers bushing kits with three bushings (.035, .040, .045). I'm running the .040 bushing which reduced the ejection distance dramatically and softened the bolt/op rod velocity. It still cycles with 100% reliability. The mini-14 is regarded a severely over gassed.
 

dfletcher

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Sep 14, 2006
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921
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Leaving California .....
E & L Manufacturing makes the best brass catcher out there. It's solid, slips on to the rifle and holds a bunch of cases. Getting a smaller gas port bushing is helpful too. I switched out to .040 (from Accuracy Systems) and it drops most empties 3 or 4 ft to my right. Accuracy Systems also sells an adjustable gas gas block. I tried it, it works well but don't use it because I bought a top section with a sight to make up for having a brake up front.
 

DGW1949

Hunter
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Apr 10, 2005
Messages
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Texas
Chuckfish said:
I have a Mini-14 that I'm trying real hard to fall in like with. I need to tame it down a bit as it throws brass into the next county. I reload and would like to be able to retrieve ALL the empties. Is there some kind of reasonable fix to cure this problem.
If I can't fix it it's goin down the road. I would like to fix this problem before I start to make other changes such as a barrel stabilizer. It's already sitting in a Hoague over molded stock. Any and all suggestions will be appreciated.

Regards

Them other guys are telling you right, you need a much smaller Gas Port Bushing (see key #9 in your parts drawing). Also note that the four Gas Block Screws (key #7) on some Mini's were staked at the factory. If that is the case with yours, you'll need to grind away the tip-end of the protruding screws before removing them to prevent damage to the threads in the top half of the Block. I'd also recomend using new scews for reassembly. You can get those from Midway, Brownells, or the factory.

Other related stuff:
Be aware that ASI sells their bushing sets in two different lengths depending on the serial number prefix of the gun in question...and that regardless of what they tell you is supposed to fit, you may end up needing to shorten them to fit properly.
The Gas Port Bushing not only serves as a metering device, it also serves to locate the lower half of the Gas Block Ass'y and the Gas Pipe (key #8).
When you get your old gas bushing out, you'll probably see that one end or the other shows dark smudges, which is evidence of gas leakage. What that tells you is that there's some amount of carbon build up on the areas it seats against. You'll need to remove that before proceding.
Pay attention to the gap between the two Gas Block during reassembly so that the gap on both sides ends up even.
I don't know if Ruger adheres to any particular torque-spec when assembling their gas blocks, but me personaly, I shoot for 35 inch pounds.
If you can't " freely wiggle" the Gas Pipe after you've finished, you'll have to remove your new bushing and shorten it. Otherwize the pipe (AKA "piston") will be forced to drag within the hole it has to fit into when the op-rod is forward, which in turn, will surely lead to premature wear of both.

Doing this aint nearly as hard as I might be making it sound, it's just that ya gotta pay attention to the details.

Hope this helped.

DGW
 

Chuckfish

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Feb 12, 2012
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The Blue Ridge
Sorry it took me so long to reply but I got busy with other stuff. DWG1949, In your opinion ...with the addition of the barrel stabilizer and the gas block mods can I achieve 1 or 2" MOA at 100 yards?
I'm a good mechanic but I sure have a devil of a time reassembeling the bolt back into this rifle after cleaning. Any trick to this. I sure would hate to have to try to field strip this gun in the woods. I can do my AR in short few mins. for a quick field clean but this thing is a PITA.

I would like to make this stainless rifle my go to truck gun around the farm but at this point it's not working out to my satisfaction. I really hate giving up on this thing...Any suggestions as to what I may be doing wrong?

Chuckfish
 

DGW1949

Hunter
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Messages
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Texas
I doubt that you're "doing anything wrong", but that it might be more of a case of having unrealistic expectations relative to how you are comparing the Mini platform to the Stoner platform, meaning that they are two entirely different rifles which other than sharing a common cartridge, have almost nothing in common.

IMO, simply "bolting on stuff" won't get you to where you want to go. Yeah, adding a strut will certainly help...but there's more at play here relative to turning a Mini-14 into an honest 2-MOA carbine than just adding a strut can cure. "Honest" in that last sentance meaning that it's group size is repeatable on demand, time after time, and that the group comprizes 5 or more shots while the gun heats up from firing....NOT merely an occasional 3-shot group fired under closely controlled conditions, or from a sled, etc, etc.
Within those perimeters, I've never seen an honest 1-MOA Mini-14 that hadn't had major modifications done to the basic platform. And just as a side note, when one gets off into that sort of thing, he is also perty-much destroying the "utility carbine" aspect...meaning that it will no longer be the light, handy, well balanced carbine that it once was.

As for you question about servicing your bolt....if the gun in question happens to be a Ranch Rifle, I've found that removing the ejector first helps a lot when R&R-ing the bolt. Other than that, it's mostly a case of holding your mouth right. :lol: .
On the other hand, one realy shouldn't have to remove the bolt from their Mini-14 more than once in a blue moon anyhow, so I can't picture a single circumstance for having to do so "in the field". After all, this aint a stinkin', high-maintanance AR that we are talking about here. :wink: .

DGW
 

Chuckfish

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 12, 2012
Messages
174
Location
The Blue Ridge
DGW1949, thank you for your input and opinions. The one thing I really like about the Mini is how it comes up and gets on target ( with the addition of the Hoague stock ). I've mad e the decision to go ahead with the smaller gas bushing and the ASI buffer. I'm probably going to add a barrel strut as well (not sure on what to use as of yet although I'm leaning towards the "Accue-Strut" . I'll go that far and see if I'm happy with those up grades. I'll keep you posted as to how I'm doing as time allows.

Thanks again,

Chuckfish
 

Voyager28

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Joined
Jul 18, 2014
Messages
112
Location
Palm Coast, FL
Well, I have to both agree and somewhat disagree with some above posts. Yes, by all means replace the gas bushing ASAP. I first went to a .045 then downsized to a .040. This past week I went down again to a .035. In addition I also installed a 1911 recoil buffer. Now brass practically lands at my feet and cycle is very tame and smooth as well as 100% reliable.

As for accuracy, my 580 series Mini Rancher, with the above mods, will shoot MOA at 100 yards all day long and will damn near do it at 200 yards. I also have to say that the only ammo I shoot is 62 grain Remington Koreloct because that's what I hunt with. I am convinced that a major portion of accuracy complaints have as much to do with ammo as it does the stock rifle.

All I can do is tell you what I have done to mine and the results I get with it.

Bob
 

dfletcher

Blackhawk
Joined
Sep 14, 2006
Messages
921
Location
Leaving California .....
Chuckfish said:
DGW1949, thank you for your input and opinions. The one thing I really like about the Mini is how it comes up and gets on target ( with the addition of the Hoague stock ). I've mad e the decision to go ahead with the smaller gas bushing and the ASI buffer. I'm probably going to add a barrel strut as well (not sure on what to use as of yet although I'm leaning towards the "Accue-Strut" . I'll go that far and see if I'm happy with those up grades. I'll keep you posted as to how I'm doing as time allows.

Thanks again,

Chuckfish

The only rifles I don't reload for are my semi-autos in 223, 308 & 30.06 - I hate losing and chasing brass & tend to neck size anyway. I've found Fiocchi 223 ammo is very good. I like their 40 grain, always does well in my Mini, Benelli, Volquartsen Evolution and whatever else. The Evolution is basically a 10/22 on steroids and it loves the Fiocchi 40 grain Nosler tipped. Costs about $19.00 per 50.
 

DGW1949

Hunter
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Messages
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Texas
Voyager28 said:
Well, I have to both agree and somewhat disagree with some above posts. Yes, by all means replace the gas bushing ASAP. I first went to a .045 then downsized to a .040. This past week I went down again to a .035. In addition I also installed a 1911 recoil buffer. Now brass practically lands at my feet and cycle is very tame and smooth as well as 100% reliable.

As for accuracy, my 580 series Mini Rancher, with the above mods, will shoot MOA at 100 yards all day long and will damn near do it at 200 yards. I also have to say that the only ammo I shoot is 62 grain Remington Koreloct because that's what I hunt with. I am convinced that a major portion of accuracy complaints have as much to do with ammo as it does the stock rifle.

All I can do is tell you what I have done to mine and the results I get with it.

Bob

Points taken Bob....I agree that no gun can group beyound the accuracy potential of the ammo it's being fed. As for your (basicaly stock) Mini-14 exhibiting it's rather remarkable precision....yep, every now and then, one can happen upon a certain Mini that just-naturaly shoots much better than most others of the same configuration, even right out of the box. That, and it also say's a lot about your own abilities as a shooter.

DGW
 

phonejack

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Joined
Apr 20, 2011
Messages
319
Location
arkansas
This may be apples vs oranges. I solved that problem when I had Garands, M1-A's and AR'S by cutting 3 sometimes 4 coils off of the ejector spring. When shooting prone they fell 2-3 feet from the rifle. Of course I had spare springs in case I wanted to revert back.
 

Chuckfish

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 12, 2012
Messages
174
Location
The Blue Ridge
Still haven't ordered the parts but have decided to go to the .35 gas bushing, 1911buffers and a stronger spring with an Accustrut.
 

Voyager28

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 18, 2014
Messages
112
Location
Palm Coast, FL
Chuckfish said:
Still haven't ordered the parts but have decided to go to the .35 gas bushing, 1911buffers and a stronger spring with an Accustrut.

Personally, I'd do it in steps. go with the gas bushing and recoil buffer first. Shoot it and try it. Reason? The combination of a .035 bushing and a stronger spring may be too much and cause FTF. Do the first two then shoot it. If still not satisfied add the stronger spring.

Also, personally, if your Mini is a newer model with the tapered barrel, the Accustrut, IMHO, does little to enhance accuracy. Older pencil barrel models? Yes. But the tapered barrel models, I'm not so sure. That would be the last thing I would do.

Good luck and please let us know how it all works out for you.

Bob
 

DGW1949

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RE: "a stronger spring"......

Do not forget that simple physics tells us that every action has is an equal and opposite reaction.
What that means in plain english that while installing a stronger recoil spring will certainly DECREASE the rearward force of the op-rod, It is just as certainly going to INCREASE it's forward force by the same amount. So with that in mind, here are some questions which you might want to consider:
(1).... Do I realy want to add to the impact stress which occurs with every shot as my op-rod is slamming to a stop against the (rather thin) face of the gas block?
(2).....How might the increased forward velocity of the (floating) firing pin add to the chance of experiencing a slam fire?
(3)...After all of these years of Mini-14 production, do I think that Ruger was simply being nilly-willy relative their choice of springs, or do I think it more likely that they actualy know more about the matter than I do?

Just something to chew on, no offense meant.

DGW
 

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