Bicentennial firearms

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martyj

Blackhawk
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Messages
670
Location
Nebraska
Is it just me or did the bicentennial firearms never really increase in value like other collectables did?
I have a NIB Rugger M77v in 6mm that doesnt appear to sell for much more than my M77v 220 swift that I owned for years.
Any opinion on why they didnt or am I incorrect.
 

Firsttimegrampa

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 22, 2004
Messages
339
Location
Havelock,NC USA
My thought on it is this. In 1976 every gun Ruger put out was a Bicentennial Model making way to many to be a collectable. If new in box with everything that came with them, they are maybe $50.00 more than one not a Bicentennial..
 

TDF

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 23, 2006
Messages
210
Location
Seward, NE
I agree with Firsttimegrampa. Plus they're new models. The new model collecting isn't what the old model collecting is. Or in other words there are way more people building old model collections than new models.

TDF
 

chet15

Hawkeye
Joined
Jan 22, 2001
Messages
6,072
Location
Dawson, Iowa
For most of the model variations, there are more Liberty marked guns out there than actual demand.
Some guns are considered pretty rare though, with limited production...such as the KNR4 4-5/8" Stainless Single-Six with Liberty rollmark, or the M77 in .416 Taylor (of course the caliber is the red flag there!) and the #1H in 45-70.
There are other rifle models or even DA models that are pretty rare, but there's just not enough interest or demand to push the price up.
When the demand takes up the supply, the prices will go up.
Chet15
 

street

Hunter
Joined
Jan 10, 2008
Messages
2,455
Location
Vinton, VA
chet15":2x83ovuo said:
For most of the model variations, there are more Liberty marked guns out there than actual demand.
Some guns are considered pretty rare though, with limited production...such as the KNR4 4-5/8" Stainless Single-Six with Liberty rollmark, or the M77 in .416 Taylor (of course the caliber is the red flag there!) and the #1H in 45-70.
There are other rifle models or even DA models that are pretty rare, but there's just not enough interest or demand to push the price up.
When the demand takes up the supply, the prices will go up.
Chet15


Don't forget the Pre-fix Stainless Steel Old Army 200th Yr. Only about 800 made, and one of those had the backwards cylinder inscription, which makes it the rarest of all 200 yr. guns as only one has been found. The 30 cal. only had about 2200 made. .45 Cal 4 5/8 in. bl. about 2100 made. 41 Mag. 4 5/8 in. bl. about 1600 made. The Mark I T678 with tapered bolt stop only had 1250 made.

When you look at a type one Flatgate, and look at the prices that that gun will bring, and you realize that there were 2000 or so made. Then some of the 200 yr. guns are way under priced. One of these days collectors will wake up and realized there are some real prizes out there to pick up and now is the time to do it before the prices skyrocket.
 

flatgate

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 18, 2001
Messages
6,784
Location
Star Valley, WY
Mr. Phil Harden sure had a fine collection of them. He and I swapped a few over the years.

Now I have but one "Made in the 200th Year of American Liberty" Ruger and it's a fine shootin' .45 cal. Blackhawk.

flatgate
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2007
Messages
5,245
Location
Southwest Washington
The only 200 year I have is a #3 30-40 Krag. I never look for them specifically. I've had a 44 Carbine and a Security Six in the past. They didn't bring anymore money than a regular model. :)

Dave :wink:
 

weaselmeatgravy

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 28, 2001
Messages
3,236
Location
Colorado native, Vermont transplant
street":1938rzsp said:
Don't forget the Pre-fix Stainless Steel Old Army 200th Yr. Only about 800 made, and one of those had the backwards cylinder inscription, which makes it the rarest of all 200 yr. guns as only one has been found.

The prefixed stainless Liberty Old Army is one that I have not added to my modest Old Army accumulation. I have seen them come up for sale but usually not in the condition I want (LNIB) for the price I want to pay (CHEAP) :)

But here is another 1-of-1 known Liberty gun, a factory second, non-cataloged model GA-84 (.38 Special) Security-Six

GA84-152-15746S.jpg
 

street

Hunter
Joined
Jan 10, 2008
Messages
2,455
Location
Vinton, VA
weaselmeatgravy, That's a great one of a kind 200 yr, Security-Six .38 Cal. GA-84. Where do you come up with all of these Ultra-rare Rugers? And how do you find them in such good shape?
 

BlkHawk73

Hunter
Joined
Dec 30, 1999
Messages
4,459
Location
Maine
TDF":1eltqo2g said:
I agree with Firsttimegrampa. Plus they're new models. The new model collecting isn't what the old model collecting is. Or in other words there are way more people building old model collections than new models.

TDF

I agree with 1stTimeGrandpa as well. Just because there's something different on something, doesn't means it's more valuable. there's needs to be sufficient demand for an item to make it desireable enough to increase the value. Without that demand... :roll:
 

picketpin

Buckeye
Joined
Jun 29, 2006
Messages
1,544
Location
Owyhee County, ID, USA
I don't buy or collect Rugers other than #1s and the occassional flat/hollow bolt 77.

Of course the 77s are way too early to be "200 Year" guns.

As far as #1s, I have 3 or 4 that are "200 Year" guns but that was more of an accident than planned for and frankly in the ones I have purchased it was because the rifle/configuration/caliber or wqood was the reason I bought the rifle.

Granted there are a few #1s that are "200 Year" marked but the rarity comes from a combination of a bunch of stuff and the true rarity is for something other than being made in 1976.

I would agree that with every gun being so marked for the year, that marking in and of itself simply isn't rare. It's the OTHER stuff PLUS being made in 1976 that make those rare.

I don't even attach the $50 extra for these guns that some guys do. But if I were to assign an added value, it would be that $50 price and nothing more.

the best

Rosss
 
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