Beginning to think the education system has failed our kids.

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GasGuzzler

Hunter
Joined
Oct 22, 2012
Messages
2,043
Location
DFW Area, Texas
It's really bad. Anyone that says otherwise either works for an ISD or is married to someone that does. I have two that just got out (2021 and 2022) and two still in. It's really bad.
 

Snake Pleskin

Banned
Joined
Mar 26, 2022
Messages
2,180
Location
Aiken, South Carolina
During my UG years I worked with a Master’s student that was thinking of teaching. During her student internship the other teachers ridiculed her for dressing nicely. You see teachers must look poor so that they can cry for more money. FYI I believe teaching is one of the most important jobs in America and they are underpaid. However they need to ditch the unions and have annual reviws before I give them another dime. Many aren’t worth what they get paid now.
Yes, like everything else, there are good ones and not so good ones. Unions have done what Unions always do, screwed up the whole process, IMHO
 

blammer

Single-Sixer
Joined
Oct 6, 2007
Messages
265
Location
Nebraska
I hear this criticism of youth and this country and of our education system often on the forum and it kinda makes me a little sick. There are more smart youth, well run schools and parts of this country that are just outstanding. Maybe some people just like to feel superior over others and to blame certain others for all the problems. Go ahead, get it off your chest but don't believe the youth, this country or our institutions are going to heck. We are strong in all the right places.
It's not the kids as stated in the title to this post. There are still many who learn no matter what. Support these kids as best you can as they ARE the ones who can bring a good future.

The problem is a lot of the education system itself. Federal government intrusion is now mandating a lot of the distractions from learning the basics. I'm not blaming teachers either, except the ones who are eagerly promoting the distractions. Talk to a teacher who has been teaching for a while to get a sense of what used to be and how far we've strayed from the basics.

The education system has been infiltrated by leftist indoctrination for decades. Teacher training and increased government control have ensured this.

Teacher friend of mine spent more time in principal's office to explain his high student failure rate than did kids disrupting his classes. Kids have to spend more and more time learning political correctness than the basic skills needed to compete with the real world (China for one).

Any kid who really wants to learn is handicapped by built-in disruptions of classes. Example: Mandated in-class presence of kids requiring individual person being with them (used to call this 'mainstreaming'). At best these kids would just sit there quietly. More times than not, they would begin talking. Sometimes, they got violent and be back in a few days. It would be the exceptional kid who could screen out the disruptions and learn in that kind of environment.

There is a reason there is a teacher shortage now. Teachers who love to teach their chosen subjects can't do it effectively any more and are quitting. They don't get support of their administration: disruptive kids get sent to the office. Unless the kid gets arrested, they are back in the classroom in a few minutes. Teachers will get in trouble for attempts to control individuals in class. Parents complaining about their kid's poor grades or teacher picking on their kid get believed and the teacher gets in trouble.

Only the exceptionally strong ones even bother fighting the system for the kids anymore. It's just become a job to be survived by the path of least resistance.

Lack of support by parents for growing numbers of reasons gets the blame. As do all the distractions available to kids outside schools.
 

Snake Pleskin

Banned
Joined
Mar 26, 2022
Messages
2,180
Location
Aiken, South Carolina
It's not the kids as stated in the title to this post. There are still many who learn no matter what. Support these kids as best you can as they ARE the ones who can bring a good future.

The problem is a lot of the education system itself. Federal government intrusion is now mandating a lot of the distractions from learning the basics. I'm not blaming teachers either, except the ones who are eagerly promoting the distractions. Talk to a teacher who has been teaching for a while to get a sense of what used to be and how far we've strayed from the basics.

The education system has been infiltrated by leftist indoctrination for decades. Teacher training and increased government control have ensured this.

Teacher friend of mine spent more time in principal's office to explain his high student failure rate than did kids disrupting his classes. Kids have to spend more and more time learning political correctness than the basic skills needed to compete with the real world (China for one).

Any kid who really wants to learn is handicapped by built-in disruptions of classes. Example: Mandated in-class presence of kids requiring individual person being with them (used to call this 'mainstreaming'). At best these kids would just sit there quietly. More times than not, they would begin talking. Sometimes, they got violent and be back in a few days. It would be the exceptional kid who could screen out the disruptions and learn in that kind of environment.

There is a reason there is a teacher shortage now. Teachers who love to teach their chosen subjects can't do it effectively any more and are quitting. They don't get support of their administration: disruptive kids get sent to the office. Unless the kid gets arrested, they are back in the classroom in a few minutes. Teachers will get in trouble for attempts to control individuals in class. Parents complaining about their kid's poor grades or teacher picking on their kid get believed and the teacher gets in trouble.

Only the exceptionally strong ones even bother fighting the system for the kids anymore. It's just become a job to be survived by the path of least resistance.

Lack of support by parents for growing numbers of reasons gets the blame. As do all the distractions available to kids outside schools.
Much of what you say is true! Especially the lack of Parental support for the school, teachers & rules. Many parents live in denial of their children's poor behavior and failures, and support it by refusing to listen to the teacher, school etc. that Johnny & Suzy are not perfect!
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2009
Messages
5,603
Location
China Spring TX
Here's some good kids instinctively helping out:


That is an excellent example of how it is how they were raised, what values imparted and how the young men or women have taken that direction and moved forward. There is never a shortage of good and decent in the world, but it is often not viewed as headline worthy, sad to say...
 

James (CA)

Bearcat
Joined
Jul 7, 2012
Messages
14
So,.......

There is those responding to this thread that think that kids today are smart.
Really?, what a lot of baloney.

I could give "Hundreds of examples", but this one should suffice,........

I was in front of my shop,..... kid asks me, "what time is it?"
I pull up my sleeve and show him my watch.
He looks at his shoes, shuffles his feet around,... then admits he can't read a watch.
Claims he could only read, "the other kind of watch", "like on a VCR"
So I say, "you mean a digital watch?", and he says, "yes".
Then I say, "doesn't every class room have a big clock on the wall?"
"if you can't read a clock, how do you know when the class is over?"
He thinks for a moment,.... his face lights up, and he says, "the bell rings!"

Come to find out that this problem is widespread,........

Try explaining some threads are inch, and some are metric to a HS graduate.
You will receive a blank stare in return.

Can't add or subtract, can't answer very basic questions without looking it up on their phone, can't change a out a flat tire, can't read a tape measure,....
I could go on and on and on.

Ignorant, uneducated, lacking even the common sense the God gave to a barbed wire fence.

I myself,...... am a High School drop out, yet I'm the one people call when they need advise to solve a difficult problem, many are college grads and often engineers.

I saw the start of this when metal shop, auto shop, wood shop, and the industrial arts were removed from Junior High and High Schools.

Nearly every kid I have encountered,........
"doesn't know the difference between their elbow and a hot rock"

And anyone who says different is either full of baloney, hasn't interacted with today's youth, or is not very bright themselves.

If the future of this nation is in the hands of today's youth then we are doomed.

I won't even start on the subject of how many of them would shoulder a rifle and defend this great nation.
The enemy could paralyze all of them by shutting off their phones.

What we have now is the, "look it up on the internet generation"

Good luck with that when the power goes out.
 

ned

Single-Sixer
Joined
May 9, 2008
Messages
372
Location
tucson az
I think it says, somewhere in the Bible, the poor will always be with us. Don’t know why that is with a library in every town and now the www for education in things from the classics to differential calculus but it seems the masses avoid learning. When I drive to work at Raytheon I encounter clerks who can’t make change but when I get to work I see engineers in the same age group who leave me awe struck.
 

Bear Paw Jack

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 19, 2001
Messages
9,660
Location
Alaska, Idaho USA
Being the 'devils advocate' for a minute. Considering how many different GPS are on the market and how many different mounts are available I doubt that many can remember which fits what, BUT I bet the 'buyer', if he/she was smart enough, could read the package and make a determination.
Actually they only carried three models, all were Garmin. Turns out the mount was in the box. You should know that much about something you sell. I’d also think you would know what a GPS is if you are going to work in electronics. Or am I expecting too much???
 

Johnny-Baseball

Single-Sixer
Joined
May 10, 2022
Messages
229
Location
Peters Colony, Republica de Tejas
So personally not much, my bachelors degree was business administration with a minor in economics and later got an associates degree in mechanical engineering. If I needed to know something I could look it up vs. wasting a few semesters on a very low possibility of future usefulness.
My second language skills are lacking but have not limited me in any fashion, enough basic Spanish to get along in south Florida and some vacations
where it was spoken. I did become fluent enough in Quebecoise French to start plenty of "stuff" while playing junior hockey in Canada, very important
to be able to curse at and personally insult your opponent in a language they understand.
While I understand your point I still think the time vs. value of studies like Latin are wasted on the masses. Maybe better off teaching a useful life skill of say personal financial management, or maybe life effecting decision making, or something more applicable to the so called real world.
In the USAF (1969-73) I operated seismic equipment (to detect Russian/Chinese/French nuclear tests). We pulled 12-hour shifts (2 days, one off, two nights, one off, back to days). Night shifts in northern Thailand (along the Thai/Burma/Laotian borders) were long and boring. So every evening I wrote down 15 new Thai words and memorized them. And refreshed my Thai words from the prior shifts. Pretty soon I was learning additional words solely from conversation with Thais. Was that helpful? Absolutely. Our Thai military allies worked with us (to provide physical security) when we'd go into the jungle to replace defective data cable (in 1/4 mile sections). Conversational Thai was essential to getting this done. Same scenario on Mindanao in the PI. Fast forward to my career in accounting. I was a partner and CFO for a Big 8 accounting firm's worldwide operation, and frequently conversed with partners in all parts of the world (Kuwait, Japan, Brazil, Indonesia, France, Germany, Italy, the Philippines, Thailand, etc.). Using a bit of "conversational" foreign language was a great way to turn business-only relationships into personal friendships, which in turn made business issues all the easier to resolve. Now retired, my Spanish is better than it was decades ago, and that helps given the large, ever-increasing influx of Mexicans and Central Americans who work here in Texas.
 

JackBull

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 3, 2021
Messages
230
Location
Wyoming, Montana
Serious question.
And how did they guarantee the " safe " aspect at those two schools ?

Half assed question...How would Latin have been a valuable addition to my education?
Latin is the basis for many of the words from English and science/math. You would have a greater understanding of the meaning and origins of the words you use everyday.
 

pyth0n

Buckeye
Joined
Sep 11, 2007
Messages
1,003
Location
Florida
Yes,, the education system has failed our kids in so many ways. Solid skills like reading, (actual) writing, normal math, true history,, (good & bad), economics, all seem to be pushed aside in favor of whatever curve is necessary for them to pass the kids along.

When was the last time you heard of a kid failing a grade & being held back?
I would put that at about the early 70's.
 

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