Because He Flies

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Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
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Location
Richmond Texas USA
There are quite a few post that are negative about todays youth on our Forum. After reading this article it got me to thinking about why my Son, Daughter, and Grandson turned out the way they are. Which I think is pretty good.
My Dad passed the flying torch to me when I took my first ride in a Cub on my Mom's lap when I was five and I passed it on. I have watched and felt that flame burn for the last 73 years in our family. Son and Grandson soloed at 16 Daughter was 18 when she soloed. Mine flame will soon go out but it is good to know it will continue to burn in our family.

This is a long read but I do hope you will take the time to read it.
There are quite a few aviation programs available for today's youth.
The next time you see or read about a young pilot think about what it took for him/her to get there.
Thanks,
Jim

A young man at my home airport recently passed his private pilot checkride, and one of the dozen or so people who gathered there to mark that happy occasion asked his parents a seemingly off-hand question: How much it had cost for their son to reach this milestone? The parents were caught up in the moment, and their sense of pride/relief/joy was more prominent in their minds than their checking account balance on that sun-splashed summer afternoon. But the question got me thinking about the not-insignificant amount this family had spent on flying, and whether it was worth it.

Their son graduated from high school a few weeks before getting his private pilot certificate, and a few months later he was going off to college. I don’t know whether he aspires to an aviation career, or frankly, whether employment considerations matter to the overall value equation. But having witnessed the transformation that took place in this teenager from the day he somewhat hesitantly started ground school as a high school sophomore, to the self-confidence that blossomed at the time of his first solo and the determination, skill, and knowledge he demonstrated during his checkride, I’d say this family got the deal of the century.

But having witnessed the transformation that took place in this teenager from the day he somewhat hesitantly started ground school as a high school sophomore to the determination, skill, and knowledge he demonstrated during his checkride, I’d say this family got the deal of the century.

Because he flies, their son has learned a skill based on poise and persistence. His takeoffs and landings were atrocious at first. But he stuck with it, learned from his errors, took direction from his flight instructor, and consistently improved.

Because he flies, he has taken on responsibilities and self-reliance that few of his peers yet know. As pilot in command, he is the final authority on the safe operation of every flight—and the passengers he takes aloft entrust him to make good decisions. The fact that so many of his friends and family are not only willing but eager to do so tells me their confidence is well placed.

Because he flies, he has learned both independence and teamwork. The independence comes from making decisions and being answerable for the consequences. The teamwork comes from cooperating with fellow pilots, mechanics, air traffic controllers, and line service workers, and knowing that all in our aviation system rely on each other.

Because he flies, he’s learned respect. He’s studied the aviation giants that have made it possible for us to fulfill mankind’s long-held dreams of flight. He’s interacted with professional pilots who have flown tens of thousands of hours and crossed oceans, and he recognizes their hard-won mastery of their art. He’s seen the painstaking work that goes into designing, building, and maintaining vintage aircraft, and he’s aware of the craftsmanship that goes into every detail.

Because he flies, he’s got a healthy curiosity about the world, its geography, its weather, and the complex interplay between them. He can read aviation charts, and knows how to judge wind speed and direction from the surface of a lake, smoke stacks, or the shadows of clouds on the ground. He can navigate accurately using sophisticated avionics, or only a compass and a clock.

Because he flies, he’s learned to plan for the worst, to prepare for aerial emergencies, and to always be ready to implement a Plan B (or C, or D) when things go awry. He’s experienced the limited value of forecasts firsthand. And he knows limitations such as how far, how fast, and how high his aircraft can fly; how much fuel it needs to reach a destination, and how much weight is safe to carry.

Because he flies, he’s learned to focus on the immediate task at hand. He can push the nagging trivialities of daily life aside and—at least during his time aloft—live entirely in the present.

Because he flies, he’ll be less tempted by the dangerous impulsivity that does such harm to every generation. Driving recklessly means nothing to those who know they can fly far faster than any highway speed limit. Excessive drinking and drug abuse can ground aviators, so hopefully he’ll steer clear of them. Flying rewards healthful moderation.

None of us can know what the future holds for our children. We do what we can to prepare them for this beautiful, violent, endlessly surprising world, but they make the choices that matter. Having watched this one young man’s journey from the distance of a few hangar rows, I get the strong feeling that flying has prepared him magnificently for life’s inevitable challenges. When times get turbulent, he’ll keep the wings level. In adversity, he’ll see things for what they are and coolly consider his options. When moments of decision come, he’ll commit without hesitation.

I’ve got only admiration for his parents, confidence in him, and I’m grateful to be part of an aviation community that could bestow such meaningful and lasting gifts on a deserving young person.
 

bobski

Hunter
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
2,794
Location
Ct., Va., & Vanzant, Mo.
air sports take a certain level of intelligence. it draws those of like minds.
plain and simple.
it certainly weeds out the crowd fairly easily.
I speak as a 22 years 'in the air' parachutist that had a close bond with pilots.
its a crowd I do miss.
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
10,293
Location
Webster, MD.
Totally agree that it brings out the best in most I have encountered. I have spent a great deal of my life in and around aviation. Almost all I have been privilege to know and fly with had a different outlook on most everything than the 'run of the mill' guy on the street. In the air there is no time for 'maybe so' types. Attention to detail and it seems to carry over into everyday life.
 
Joined
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Messages
8,973
Location
Greenville, SC: USA
I have very little knowledge about flying... but it sure seems to me like it would not only take a good level of intelligence but also a great deal of discipline.

And I think the discipline is the key part in this discussion.

I have a FAA pilot's license to fly unmanned aircraft, yep that means drones. To fly a drone commercially you have to pass a FAA test and that is one mother of a test believe me. I thought for sure I had failed it but some how pulled off .....
 

ned

Single-Sixer
Joined
May 9, 2008
Messages
351
Location
tucson az
Thank you for that…..I dropped out of the Civil Air Patrol at 16 because the cur teaching the ground school convinced me I was not smart enough to fly. I took up skydiving 10 years later because I still craved aviation….not as hard core as Bobski but 800 jumps. When I moved to CAVU Arizona at 55 I decided to get a pilot’s certificate just to prove to myself I could do it. I intended to get the certificate and never fly again….but, bought a plane and now have 2000 hours. To your point..the things I learned and the confidence gained would have greatly improved my life if I had stuck with it at 16.
 

blammer

Single-Sixer
Joined
Oct 6, 2007
Messages
228
Location
Nebraska
Absolutely. Flying is real world. You cant fake or talk your way out of defying the laws of physics. Lose focus and bad things happen. Autopilots have taken away a lot of the seat of the pants decision making, but small aircraft still demand it.
 
Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
5,360
Location
Richmond Texas USA
I Thought I would bring this back for the new members along with pictures.

Grandson receiving his Private License in Feb. 2015. He now has Commercial Single and Multi Engine License, Single Eng. Seaplane Rating and soon to have an Instrument Rating and Aircraft and Power Plant Repairmen License. He now has almost 2500 hours and most in low and slow planes
1647897379106.png


His first passenger was his Grandmother
1647897445778.png
 

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