Bear Attack in Montana,

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Bear Paw Jack

Hawkeye
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Dec 19, 2001
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http://www.ktvq.com/story/33299198/montana-man-documents-moments-after-grizzly-bear-attack?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook_Q2_News

BILLINGS -
"Yeah life sucks in bear country," Todd Orr said wryly with his face covered in blood. He had just survived two attacks.

Orr posted the video of him describing a grizzly with two cubs sprint at him from 80 yards away on Saturday in the Madison Valley in southwest Montana.

"I sprayed the sh*t out of her with bear spray," Orr said. He protected the back of his neck.

Still, the grizzly swiped the right side of his head, creating a deep gash several inches long and puncture to his arm.

"I think my arm's broke, but my legs are good, my internal organs are good, eyes are good," Orr said. "Be safe out there. Bear spray doesn't always work, but it's better than nothing."

We reached out to Orr for further comment but have yet to hear back.

Below is his full Facebook post:

Hello everyone.
Thought I should share yesterday morning's Grizzly incident.

I took an early morning hike in the Madison valley to scout for elk. Knowing that bears are common throughout southwest Montana, I hollered out "hey bear" about every 30 seconds so as to not surprise any bears along the trail.

About three miles in, I stepped out into an open meadow and hollered again. A few more steps and I spotted a sow Grizzly bear with cubs on the trail at the upper end of the meadow. The sow saw me right away and they ran a short distance up the trail. But suddenly she turned and charged straight my way. I yelled a number of times so she knew I was human and would hopefully turn back. No such luck. Within a couple seconds, she was nearly on me. I gave her a full charge of bear spray at about 25 feet. Her momentum carried her right through the orange mist and on me.

I went to my face in the dirt and wrapped my arms around the back of my neck for protection. She was on top of me biting my arms, shoulders and backpack. The force of each bite was like a sledge hammer with teeth. She would stop for a few seconds and then bite again. Over and over. After a couple minutes, but what seemed an eternity, she disappeared.

Stunned, I carefully picked myself up. I was alive and able to walk so I headed back down the trail towards the truck 3 miles below. As I half hiked and jogged down the trail, I glanced at my injuries. I had numerous bleeding puncture wounds on my arms and shoulder but I knew I would survive and thanked god for getting me through this. I hoped the bleeding wasn't too significant. I really didn't want to stop to dress the wounds. I wanted to keep moving and put distance between us.

About five or ten minutes down the trail, I heard a sound and turned to find the Griz bearing down at 30 feet. She either followed me back down the trail or cut through the trees and randomly came out on the trail right behind me. Whatever the case, she was instantly on me again. I couldn't believe this was happening a second time! Why me? I was so lucky the first attack, but now I questioned if I would survive the second.

Again I protected the back of my neck with my arms, and kept tight against the ground to protect my face and eyes. She slammed down on top of me and bit my shoulder and arms again. One bite on my forearm went through to the bone and I heard a crunch. My hand instantly went numb and wrist and fingers were limp and unusable. The sudden pain made me flinch and gasp for breath. The sound triggered a frenzy of bites to my shoulder and upper back. I knew I couldn't move or make a sound again so I huddled motionless. Another couple bites to my head and a gash opened above my ear, nearly scalping me. The blood gushed over my face and into my eyes. I didn't move. I thought this was the end. She would eventually hit an artery in my neck and I would bleed out in the trail... But I knew that moving would trigger more bites so a laid motionless hoping it would end.

She suddenly stopped and just stood on top of me. I will never forgot that brief moment. Dead silence except for the sound of her heavy breathing and sniffing. I could feel and her breath on the back of my neck, just inches away. I could feel her front claws digging into my lower back below my backpack where she stood. I could smell the terrible pungent odor she emitted. For thirty seconds she stood there crushing me. My chest was smashed into the ground and forehead in the dirt. When would the next onslaught of biting began. I didn't move.
And then she was gone.

I tried to peek out without moving but my eyes were full of blood and I couldn't see. I thought that if she came back a third time I would be dead, so I had to do something. Staying in position on the ground, I slowly reached under my chest to grab at the pistol I was unable to get to earlier. I felt I needed something to save my life. The pistol wasn't there. I groped around again but nothing. I wiped the blood from one eye and looked around.
No bear.

The pistol and holster were lying five feet to my left. The bear's ferocious bites and pulling had ripped the straps from the pack and the holster attached to it. Now trashed, that backpack may have helped prevent many more serious bites on my back and spine.
I picked everything up and moved down the trail again. I couldn't believe I had survived two attacks. Double lucky!
Blood was still dripping off my head and both elbows and my shirt was soaked to the waist and into my pants. But a quick assessment told me I could make it another 45 minutes to the truck without losing too much blood.
I continued the jog just wanting to put more distance between that sow and I.

At the trailhead was one other vehicle. I really hoped that person didn't run into the same bear.
I snapped a couple quick photos and a video of my wounds, laid some jackets over the truck seat and headed for town. I stopped a rancher along the way and asked him to make a call to the hospital. When I got into cell service, I made a quick call to my girlfriend to ask how her morning was going, before freaking her out and asking her to bring me a change of clean clothes to the hospital.
Another call to 911 and I gave the operator a quick run down of my injuries and asked her to call the hospital and give them a heads up that I was ten minutes out.
Moments later I was met at the front door by the doctor, nurse and an officer. I had to ask the officer to open the door, put my truck in park, and unbuckle my seat belt. My left arm was useless. He was impressed I had taken the effort to buckle.
Once inside, the x-rays revealed only a chip out of the ulna bone in my forearm. Following was eight hours of stitching to put me back together. Most were arm and shoulder punctures and tears. A 5" gash along the side of my head will leave a nasty scar, but I'm hoping my balding doesn't come on too quickly and leave that one exposed. :)
And finally, this morning, numerous deep bruises and scrapes are showing up from the bites that didn't quite break the skin. Dark bruising in the shape of claws, line across my lower back and butt where the bear stood on me. Also a few more chest bruises and facial abrasions from being smashed and slammed into the ground.

Not my best day, but I'm alive.
So thankful I'm here to share with all of you. :)
In a couple weeks I will have to clean out the truck a little better. My girlfriend says it looks like I had gutted an elk in the drivers seat.

Pictures and stuff on the link.
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
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Messages
7,596
Location
missouri
"Sounds like a back pack went a long way toward saving his life."

Handgun not so much, eh. If he'd gone to the gun first rather than the piddly wink bear spray, things might have gone differently.
I've been in that area and several times walked for quite a while with my 44 in my hand for this very reason. Some places don't allow you an 80 yard window of opportunity.
Tom was a wee bit jumpy and carried the shotgun in his hands more than hung on his packframe and at least one time we were close enough to smell a bear. I walked backward for a couple hundred yards because I didn't want to turn my back on a possible charge.
I found out later that we really had been maybe too naive as a sow griz with a cub was reported to be living right where we'd been scouting. Since we didn't find any hair to confirm the griz part, I ASSumed we were dealing with a black bear. We found several "day beds" and logs that had been rolled to look for ants and grubs.
 

Pat-inCO

Hawkeye
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
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In the AZ oven (Phoenix basin)
Something tells me he is leaving out some important details.

He is one of the types that needs to have little bells attached to his back
pack so the bears can hear him coming. Then with his bear spray the
wildlife person will know it was him. The bear scat will have little bells
in it and will smell of pepper. :roll:
 

Bear Paw Jack

Hawkeye
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Messages
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Location
Alaska, Idaho USA
IN ALASKA 5 BEAR ATTACKS SINCE AUG 7, FOR S. E. ALASKA

A grizzly bear mauling of a deer hunter in Southeast Alaska has brought to five the number of attacks reported in the northwest corner of the Alexander Archipelago since Aug. 7.

All of the attacks appear to have involved surprise encounters with bears at close range. None of the attacks are related. There are no indications the bears are targeting people.

But what can only be called a “bear-attack cluster” has heightened questions surrounding the possibility weak salmon runs in the ABC Islands – Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof – have put the bears on edge.

The area is home to a large population of brown/grizzly bears, but five attacks in a time spawn of under two months is unprecedented.

The latest attack came near the village of Hoonah on Chichagof only about 40 miles north of the first attack. Most of the attacks appear to have involved sow grizzlies – commonly called brown bears in Alaska – protecting cubs.

Details on the attack are sketchy. The U.S. Coast Guard, which reportedly picked up the injured hunter and a companion on Saturday has yet to publish an official statement on its role in the rescue, but KTOO – the public radio station in Juneau, the state capital – said it was told by Coast Guard Lt. Greg Isbell that the two hunters were “ambushed” by a bear while hiking in steep terrain.

“One hunter said they had to kill the mother to save their lives,” the station reported. “Isbell said after the mother was killed it was still a tense situation.

“’The hunters had to continue to shoot warning shots at the other two bears to keep them away because they kept trying to close in while they waited (for) transportation,’ he said.”

The hunters’ description would indicate the “cubs” were two-year-olds, possibly three-year-olds. Cubs of the year generally weigh 100 pounds or less and are no real threat to people. But bear cubs will usually stay with their mother at least two years and sometimes three.

Two years old can weigh up to 200 pounds by fall, and three-year-olds even more. Both are capable of surviving on their own if they lose their mothers.

The name of the injured hunter is not yet available. He was reported to have been taken to Bartlett Memorial Hospital in Juneau after being picked up by a Sitka-based Coast Guard helicopter. His condition is not known, but he was described to have been bitten in the thigh.

Why Southeast salmon runs faltered this year after years of strong runs is unclear, but there are indications of a shortage of food in the ocean or a heavy preadation when juveniles went to sea. That could explain why the fewer returning salmon were also larger than normal this year.

The theory is this:

If many young fry died soon after emerging from Southeast streams, there would be fewer old fry to feed on the pasture’s of the North Pacific later in the summer. That could ensure a better food supply for the survivors which would then grow bigger.

This is a developing story.

https://craigmedred.news/2016/10/02/ak-bear-attack-5/
 
Joined
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Woodbury, Tn
Jim Fowler used bear spray twice on the same bear. His comment " had the bear returned, we were defenseless." I.e. They used up their spray. The OP proves to me that precious time is used up with spray, instead of getting out a gun. A gun is useless if not used. Lots of good info. 1) wear a pack. 2) use a gun. 3) if being mauled, lay face down, protect the back of neck, and be as still as possible.
gramps
 

exavid

Hunter
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Medford, OR
I lived in Kotzebue for 10 years, Ketchikan for seven years and fifteen years in Juneau. Spent a lot of time poking around in the country with several different airplanes in wheels, skis and floats and several different boats over those years. You tend to meet a goodly number of bears both black and brown and grizzly. I never once carried bear spray. What do you do with that stuff when the bear is to windward of you? I relied mostly on a good old S&W model 29 and a speed loader on my belt. Not in a backpack or somewhere that takes more than two seconds to get to.
Boone and Crockett used to call 'em Brownies when they live within 75 miles of tidewater and Grizzlys when further inland. Brownies do tend to be a bit larger due to better feeding conditions and milder weather.
 

Bear Paw Jack

Hawkeye
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Messages
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Alaska, Idaho USA
I first went to Alaska with a 4" Nickel model 29. Nice looking gun (wish I still had it) and carried it in a Bianchi shoulder holster. I don't think there was even Pepper spray for bears til about the mid 1990s. I don't know any natives that have any faith in the pepper spray. I brought some into Barrow when I lived there, they tell me polar bears weren't impressed with the stuff. Good enough for me.

I was using a 328 grain HC cast by Ace Dube there in Anchorage. Good bullet. Go through both shoulders of a moose. I knew I was onto something.

Reuben said to tell you and Gramps hello. Bear got into his bud's cabin so they are now hauling material up the river to close it back up. He sent me a picture of a "pile" of berries, fresh though the bear. I told him not to let them go bad, but he offered to can them for me and send them. That's what I get.
 

Phoenix too

Blackhawk
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Messages
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Massachusetts
#1 Daughter lives in Montana. Spends about every weekend 'out'. She carries two cans of spray, but has never had to use one on a bear, yet.

My late friend, Chuck, said one never, ever, wants to mess with a bear. Most folks shooting a charging bear will be dead before the bear, according to Chuck.
 

Phoenix too

Blackhawk
Joined
Oct 30, 2005
Messages
643
Location
Massachusetts
#1 Daughter lives in Montana. Spends about every weekend 'out'. She carries two cans of spray, but has never had to use one on a bear, yet.

My late friend, Chuck, said one never, ever, wants to mess with a bear. Most folks shooting a charging bear will be dead before the bear, according to Chuck.
 

Bear Paw Jack

Hawkeye
Joined
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Messages
9,600
Location
Alaska, Idaho USA
#6 since August in Alaska. A, B, C, islands are very dense with brown bears.

man recovers in Juneau after bear mauling
• Startled sow with cubs attacked deer hunters on Chichagof Island • Juneau man killed the bear as she had Hoonah man pinned down
Posted: October 2, 2016 - 2:25pm
By PAULA ANN SOLIS
JUNEAU EMPIRE

A Hoonah man is continuing his recovery today in Juneau after a brown bear attack Saturday on Cichagof Island during a deer hunting expedition.

Bartlett Regional Hospital spokesperson Katie Bausler said that Josh Dybdahl, 30, remains “in good condition with multiple puncture wounds, but non-life-threatening.” Bausler said she did not know exactly what time Dybdahl was admitted to the hospital, but according to an Alaska State Trooper dispatch the attack took place at approximately 12:30 p.m.

Troopers said that Dybdahl was near Neka Bay during the attack, just southwest of Hoonah. He was accompanied by a Juneau man, Anthony Lindoff, 36, and the two were preparing to call for deer when they told troopers they heard a “whoof” sound just before a brown bear charged at them from a nearby brush. According to the dispatch report, Dybdahl was pinned to the ground by the bear. Lindoff was able to reach for his rifle and killed the bear, according to the dispatch. The AST investigation revealed that two cubs were traveling with the sow bear.

A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter picked the men up and transported them to BRH for treatment.

Troopers said the Alaska Department of Fish and Game has been notified of the incident.

Dybdahl did not immediately respond to the Empire’s request for an interview by the time this story was filed.
 

Bkat

Blackhawk
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Spring, Texas
Or carry Buffalo Bore ammo in a .32 H&R Magnum. :mrgreen: (anybody remember that thread from several years ago?)
 
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