Any Airplane Owners Here??

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Joined
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5,393
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Richmond Texas USA
Well we had a thread that had some fantastic Vettes. Are there any airplane owners on the Forum?
I know there are some pilots on here.
Here are some that Son, Grandson and I have. Son and I are also currently building a Carbon Cub EX-3
1943 SNJ-4, 1961 P Model Bonanza, 1973 Starduster Too, 1959 Champion 7-GC

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1967 Citabria
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1967 Beechcraft Baron

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Van's RV-7
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Son and I are also currently building a Carbon Cub EX-3 which is similar to this EX-2 the 3 of us built.
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Bob Wright

Hawkeye
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Memphis, TN USA
The AT-6 (later the T-6) was the Air Force version of the SNJ. They were used as sort of an air taxi during WW II and I was to see many of them coming into, and leaving from, Memphis. To this day, I don't know the reason, but as they approached the Memphis Air Base, they would rev up their engine with a brief roaring buzz.

Bob Wright
 

dannyd

Blackhawk
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Jacksonville, Florida
Tell your son I was a HSL Det Chief for 9 years, so no I don't ever want to be responsible for another aircraft for as long as I live. :)
 

ned

Single-Sixer
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tucson az
I am a bit intimidated to post after those pictures but I do have a little Varga Kachina. One of those “cute little airplanes that can just barely kill you”. Fly it about 80 hours a year…..so slow that it gets bugs on the back widow but I love it.
 

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Bob,
A little history about the North American Texan SNJ/T-6.
SNJ = Scout Trainer North American
AT = Advanced Trainer.
It was the advanced trainer for both the Navy and USAAF/USAF until 1952-3 ?? along with other duties that included advanced pilot training, Pilot Gunnery two forward firing 30 Cals., Navy Aircrew Aerial Gunnery Training with a 30 Cal. in the back seat, Bombing, bomb racks under each wing and Forward Air Control in Korea.
Most all WWII Fighter Pilot along with most single engine Navy Pilots flew the Texan before receiving their wings.
The sound you heard was the prop control being pushed forward and the prop going to full pitch for landing. This allowed the prop to be positioned in case of a go around. You will get an increase in RPM unless you are back on the power. On take off they make the buzzing sound due to the prop tips going sonic.

Here is a picture of Memphis NAS looks like a bunch of T-28s and others. Probably the early 60s,

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ned

Single-Sixer
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tucson az
Great explanation on prop pitch and great picture. I lived in Memphis 1971-73 but had no idea NAS Millington was so big
 
Joined
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Messages
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I am a bit intimidated to post after those pictures but I do have a little Varga Kachina. One of those “cute little airplanes that can just barely kill you”. Fly it about 80 hours a year…..so slow that it gets bugs on the back widow but I love it.
Ned,
Your Varga looks GREAT. Don't put it down. I know a bunch of folks that would love it also. Tandem seating and a stick what more could a pilot want :)
By the way a J3 Cub is the safest airplane. It can just barely KILL YOU
 

ned

Single-Sixer
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Messages
353
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tucson az
Indeed that Varga has forgiven me a few sins. 1600 hours, I put on 1000 of them. Full IFR , G650 and two G5s. Always hangered and fanatically maintained.
I am 72…got to sell it soon but hoping for another year or so.
where did that quote come from? Scott Crossfield ?
 

protoolman

Hunter
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Oct 15, 2001
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ND
Grew up living and breathing everything to do with aviation. Dad taught me to fly. He was an a&p private and commercial pilot with aircrew military experience on Navy blimps and constellations and P2V s. We lived at the Airport next to dads repair hanger in the 80s. Dad later got into the FAA. Now dad is so old he doesn't keep a flight medical current and has given it all up. I just couldn't afford the lifestyle. Our last aircraft was a little Stinson that a hanger blew down on. Flew all the new Cessnas in the 80s that our company sold, leased and repaired. Multiple 182s, a mixmaster and a 150 and a 421. Now motorcycles seem similar but far cheaper to play with.
 
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protoolman,
Great story, that had to be a great way of growing up. As you pobably know ther are other options to FAA Medical, such as Basic Med and Light Sport.
Sorry to hear about the Stinson. Was it a 108 -1 -2 or -3 or a Stinson 105.
 
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Beautiful machines but a hobby that's a little too rich for my blood.

caryc This is not to rag on you I just wanted to tell my story for what it's worth to
all :)

Yes It can be a rich mans hobby. But in my case it was/is just an average guys hobby.
For almost 60 years I have been buying and restoring planes. It all started with a $1100 1946 Aeronca Champ in 1965 that I had to borrow the money from the bank and my Dad. I have never been able to use household money for planes. The extra money came from working overtime 50-60 Hrs. weeks, out of town and overseas assignments, along with the plane profits.
Most all Pilots want to live with their plane in the back yard. Well in 1978 we had the opportunity to do that. But here again how to do it. At the time we could sell the house we had built and get a pretty good equity out of it along with selling airplanes and my 1973 XKE Roadster. So I drew up a set of plans, we sold the house and moved closer to where we were going to build and enrolled the kids in the new school district. Now it was time to get the construction and permanent loans. After that was completed I took a 6 month leave of absent, bought a nail gun, hired a carpenter, helper and started building a house. I worked for 6 months 12-18 hrs. a day with no days off. Must be why I went from 155# to 125# Well in 6 months our family had a 3400 sq.ft. house finished. Wife did all the painting, wallpaper and helped me when I need an extra hand. Kids at 10 and 5 did the clean up and such.
Well now we need a hangar so I bought a welding machine and a bunch of steel and started welding up trusses. Since I was still working it took Son and me 3 months to built a 42'X60' hanger and I designed and fabricated a bi-fold door for it.

Now was it worth the $$$$$$$$$$$ and time spent.
Let me answer that by saying it allowed both our kids to be involved in aviation and both became Naval Aviators and retired with 29 and 25 years of service and a love of Aviation.
As far as Wifie and me. Living with neighbors that you have a common interest with and being in the country has been WONDERFUL THESE LAST 44 years

Grandson, Son, and I built a plane that we enjoyed building and Grandson made a good profit from the sale along with receiving his FAA Airframe and Power Plant Mechanics License.
Grandson also has a Commercial Pilot License Single and Multi Engine, and a Seaplane Rating with about 2500 hours total official time at 25 years old.
He also just bought a house and hangar on the same airpark his Dad lives on.
YES PRICELESS!!!
 
Joined
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I did it different, maybe more typical. I sold my 172 several years ago, basically didn't have much time to use it and became a little bored flying it.
I took aerobatic lessons, close to 40 hours worth in some pretty good aircraft, none of which I could justify the cost to own as a toy. So now I go flying with friends once and a while and don't really miss it.
The 172 cost me about $23,000 way back when, owned it for close to 22 years and sold it for $48,000. Spent an average of $1500 a year maintenance plus
about $2500 a year on a hanger at an airport with ILS approaches, nice to maybe come home at the end of a weekend or meeting. Did a major overhaul
of engine and all accessories somewhere in there, about $12,000 doing much of the work myself under supervision of an A and I.
So very very round numbers....flew it about 1000 hours, fuel around 7-8 gallons per hour lets call it 8000 gallons at $2.00 per gallon average over the years. Add maybe $800 per year for insurance for 22 years....etc
Bottom line skipping... many details in the math story problem, maybe spent around $110,000 to $120,000 over the 22 years. Divide that by a 1000 hours
and you get a fairly expensive toy, keep in mind that was a basic "cheap" airplane.
I had about $4000 in lessons to get my private and instrument rating, I've heard over $10,000 these days, maybe higher depending where you live.
 

Ride1949

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Jim,
That's what's meant when you hear "Living the dream." Wonderful life story. Thanks for sharing that.
 
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Thanks Dave,
That is probably about average expenses. A 172 is a good ship they sold more 172s than any other. What year was yours? I had a 1955 170 from 1970-1974 and flew a friends 1966 172.
I'll do a cost on my Bonanza that I have had for 32 years. Both Trey and I have flown it for about 800 hrs.
I paid $27,500 for it in 1990 probably worth $90,000 + now.
I have no hangar rent and I don't carry insurance on it.
Did the Engine overhaul in 1994 for around $6000 and all the parts (Gear Motor, Electric Fuel Pump, Mags) over the years $2000. Have not had to pay for maintenance.
Other miscellaneous stuff $500 +-
I did the strip, paint, windshield, windows and interior for around $4000
So over 32 years $12,500 +- or $390.00 a year. Not bad for the trips and places we have been able to go to as a hobby. I didn't figure in the gas since we would have probably spent the same driving with motels and stuff. In fact the gas is normally the only expense I have on my planes If I sold it today which I won't it would have a $50,000 profit. :) That is also the same on all our planes. So far I have never lost $$$$$ on the sale of a plane.
Dave, Thanks for the info
 

jims

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 9, 2015
Messages
50
I do not own an aircraft. I however soloed on my 16th birthday in 1964 in a Piper Colt. Later got my private license when I was in the military. Have not flown in years. Back in the day I rented a T Craft for $6 an hour wet. My father did own a share of a Cub in the early 50s.
 
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