A Psycho on the Alaska Highway

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Bear Paw Jack

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 19, 2001
Messages
9,572
Location
Alaska, Idaho USA
vancouversun.com

Double homicide victims had just begun to explore Canada
The bodies of Chynna Noelle Deese of the United States and Lucas Robertson Fowler of Australia were found south of Liard Hot Springs Monday.

GLENDA LUYMES & TIFFANY CRAWFORD Updated: July 19, 2019

The van was parked on the shoulder of the Alaska Highway, hood propped open, prompting mechanic Curtis Broughton to stop and ask the travellers if they needed help.

The young man and woman, sitting in lawn chairs on the grassy verge between road and forest, were friendly and seemed happy. The engine of their van had flooded, the man told Broughton, but he knew how to get it running. They had food and water — and they were only 20 kilometres south of Liard Hot Springs, a short distance to go in the middle of the vast wilderness on B.C.’s northern border.

“It’s an area where there’s more trees than people,” said Curtis’ wife, Sandra, who observed the couple from the passenger seat as her husband briefly engaged in “a little truck talk” with the young man.

It was about 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, and the Broughtons were headed south, returning home to Fort Nelson after a week of camping in the Yukon. The couple in the van appeared to be driving north in the direction of the hot springs. They didn’t need help, so the Broughtons carried on.

On Wednesday, Sandra came across an RCMP press release on Facebook. Two adults had been found dead on the Alaska Highway. Police wanted to speak with anyone who had seen a blue van with an Alberta license plate.

“I was shocked when I heard,” said Sandra. “We saw no other people around, no animals.”

On Friday, RCMP confirmed they are investigating a double homicide and identified the victims as 24-year-old Chynna Noelle Deese of the United States and 23-year-old Lucas Robertson Fowler of Australia. They believe the couple was killed sometime between 4 p.m. Sunday afternoon and 8 a.m. Monday morning.

At a press conference, Sgt. Janelle Shoihet said she could not reveal how the couple died, or if their bodies were found inside or outside the van.


Police, including investigators from the Lower Mainland, are still on scene and are trying to determine a timeline of events, as well as “all the details related to the van,” including whether it was being driven by the couple, she said. They are also working to determine if the couple’s deaths were targeted or a “crime of opportunity.” There is nothing to indicate they are linked to any other ongoing or previous investigation.

“We’re absolutely committed to this investigation and it’s a priority for us,” said Shoihet when asked what she’d like to tell the families of the victims, including Fowler’s father, a high-ranking police officer in the state of New South Wales.

In a statement posted on Facebook, the Fowler family said they are travelling to Canada “to be with our boy and to bring him home.” They are being accompanied by several Australian police officers, who are coming to Canada to offer support to the family, not to aid in the investigation.

“To lose someone so young and vibrant, who was travelling the world and just enjoying life to the full, is devastating,” said the family’s statement. “To know his beautiful girlfriend … also lost her life in this violent event is too cruel.”



On his Facebook page, Deese’s brother, who goes by the name British Dwayne, said his sister left home to see the cattle branding at a ranch where Fowler was working and to “travel through the top half of the globe.”

Dwayne said he tried to text his sister earlier this week, but she didn’t reply. He learned of her death after the “most chaotic day of my life” and several hours on the phone with the U.S. Embassy and investigators.

“Chynna and Lucas’ lives were abruptly taken from a random act of violence while starting their road trip through Canada,” said Dwayne. “She is so deeply woven as a piece of my childhood and everyday life.”

Deese’s sister Kennedy Deese also posted a tribute on Facebook, saying the couple were “bright and beautiful souls.”

On her CouchSurfing page, Deese wrote that her “current mission” is to travel the world. She was a student at Appalachian State University, where her sorority sisters remembered her as a “kind and adventurous soul.”


The area where the couple’s bodies were found is remote and doesn’t have cell reception. The largest community in the area is Fort Nelson, about four hours south of Liard Hot Springs along Highway 97 through dense woods punctuated by lakes, parks and tiny settlements. Most businesses close before dark.

Because the homicide happened along Highway 97, Australian media speculated the deaths could be attributed to a serial killer and the Highway of Tears investigation. RCMP reiterated they have no evidence to indicate the homicide is linked to any other investigation.

A person who answered the phone at the Liard Hot Springs Lodge did not want to comment. A person at the Northern Rockies Lodge in Muncho, about an hour from the homicide scene, said she had no information about the couple.

RCMP are asking anyone who saw Fowler and Deese, or the blue van, or anyone with dashcam footage, to contact the Northern Rockies RCMP detachment at 250-774-2700. Police appealed in particular to people who may have driven the Alaska Highway last weekend and continued on to Alaska, Yukon or Alberta and may not have been aware of the homicide
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2007
Messages
1,653
Location
Texas
Evil exists. A shame that Canada, like so many other nations, doesn’t allow people within its borders to protect themselves from evil with a firearm. And a shame that these young people didn’t have the wherewithal to protect themselves with any other expedient method.
 

vito

Hunter
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
Messages
2,813
Location
Northern Illinois
On more than one occasion I have declined to cross the border into Canada as part of a vacation, since to do so would have meant leaving any and all firearms at home, and thus being unarmed for the entire trip. And while it would have been easy to enter Canada with hidden arms, the use of such arms, even in a totally and clearly self defensive situation, would result in serious criminal prosecution merely for possessing those arms. Its not worth it. The armed criminals are the ones that benefit the most from the gun control laws, and the lives of these two young people are a clear example of the price that good people pay for the virtue signaling of the Canadian social justice warriors.
 
Joined
Oct 26, 2006
Messages
9,395
Location
Woodbury, Tn
Yep, there is a problem along the Canadian Alaska Highway. How many murders have occurred on it? Yet Canada persists in not allowing people the dignity of self defense! Where oh where were the RCMP when this couple so desperately needed their help?
gramps
PS Highway of tears investigation is along Hwy 16. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highway_of_Tears
 

Bear Paw Jack

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 19, 2001
Messages
9,572
Location
Alaska, Idaho USA
During my time in Alaska, we ventured into Canada many times, as that's what it takes to cut over to SE Alaska where my wife has family. I never took that trip without taking a gun with me. Mostly I brought a Marlin 336 in 30-30, but mostly in 35 Remington. May not be as handy as a handgun, but it is rare that I go somewhere without a gun. Evil, happens and is for more frequent than people want to admit.
 

reuben_j_cogburn

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 5, 2006
Messages
843
Location
alaska
I brought nearly 20 shotguns and rifles though the border without a hitch.... Some of them in the home defence (bear gun), variety...
Even my SKS para, was legal back then..
So I don't think, not being able to have a gun was the issue.....
Canadians have a reputation as being Minnesota friendly...... But bad people are everywhere....
And the guy who owns the small lodge right off the highway near Laird was an absolute jerk....
 

kmoore

Buckeye
Joined
Mar 29, 2017
Messages
1,158
Location
Idaho
This is a sad story for sure. What gets me is the coverage. I think it is good. They made a long lengthy story without going into details that affect the investigation. Than compare USA murders. Many will never get nation wide press, the big cities put out numbers mostly and sometimes ages of victims. Maybe a paragraph of information in the local paper. It seems it has gone to just to many murders in the US to give them much press until it involves the rich and famous or a real strange type of murder.
 

BDM1

Single-Sixer
Joined
Oct 11, 2016
Messages
498
MANY stories are not reported much (except maybe locally), because of political correctness. Google "murders of Channon Christian and Christopher Newsom". Some of you probably never knew about, there was a reason for that.
 

exavid

Hunter
Joined
Jan 2, 2011
Messages
3,071
Location
Medford, OR
It's indeed too bad. In the late '60s and early 70's you could bring a handgun into Canada under seal. It was a thing piece of wire down the barrel and back out with a lead seal holding the two ends. It wasn't strong so it would have been easy to rip it off if you really needed it.

One problem was in leaving Canada you had to check out with customs to show the guns with intact seals were unbroken. Too many guns came into Canada and didn't leave. The Canadians didn't know whether some folks were just failing to declare them on the way our or were selling them illegally so they eventually stopped letting gun travel through "in bond" as they called it.
 

RUFFBIRD

Blackhawk
Joined
Sep 17, 2003
Messages
562
Location
northern ontario, CANADA
It has now been reported that the two missing teenagers are suspects in the three murders in northern BC.
They were also confirmed to be in Northern sask today. (monday)
 

pete44ru

Hunter
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Messages
2,176
Location
Rhode Island
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A cross-country manhunt is underway for two B.C. teens considered suspects in the murders of two young, international tourists on the Alaska Highway, as well as the death of a man on Highway 37 near Dease Lake last week.

Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, both from Port Alberni on Vancouver Island, are considered dangerous and were last seen in northern Saskatchewan, police said this morning (July 23).

By the afternoon, Manitoba RCMP reported the teens may have been sighted in Gillam, nearly 1,100 km northeast of Winnipeg, and later confirmed the sighting to Glacier Media.


kam-mcleod-and-bryer-schmelgesky.png;w=960;h=640;bgcolor=000000

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