A Cub Update

Help Support Ruger Forum:

Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
2,014
So basically a good deal of care and patience, don't skip the double checks and the POS windshield almost installs itself.
Remember, you're spending quality time with your family.
Look at the bright side, at least you don't have to heat mold it from a flat sheet.
I think I'd take fiddling with the windshield over the paint work any day.
Here's to a completely boring first flight.
Looking good, is it sold yet?
 
Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
5,743
Location
Richmond Texas USA
Dang that looks nice.
I assume it is an EX? How man hours do ya'll have in it so far?
jimbo,
Sorry I didn't answer sooner. The factory says 1000 hours to complete one. We don't keep track but I'm sure it takes us longer. We must work slower than the rest of the builders. :)
I didn't keep track on my Starduster but the avg. is probably 3500-4000 hours.

Dave,
Son wants to keep and fly this one awhile before it goes on the market. Probably depends on when he gets another project.
 

caryc

Hawkeye
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,848
Location
Southern California
Beautiful project. I have a lot of respect for your talents. I really know nothing about aircraft but I will throw in one thing that I found very interesting.

When I worked in an aircraft job shop, the boss had a whole H86 sitting in his back yard, minus the engine. Anyway I was comparing a flap contour that we were making to one on that plane. I found that the wing and tail flaps if that's what you call them were perfectly balanced. They had a small counter weight on the other side of the hinge so that if you pushed the flap up or down, it would always go right back to aligning with the wing. Cool stuff.
 
Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
5,743
Location
Richmond Texas USA
Cary,
Quite a few planes will have the tail flap(elevator) and ailerons balanced like you describe. This allows for less stick pressure (along with other stuff) required by the pilot. The balance is done by having the weight forward of the hinge point/pins. It also helps eliminate flutter of the controls which can destroy the plane. In the 60s I was at a fly-in and saw a guy killed in a homebuilt due to aileron flutter which tore off the aileron and caused the plane to crash.
Early P-38s had a elevator buffet problems because of this. This kept them form diving at high speeds and allowed the enemy to escape. Later models had a dive flap added and a larger balance weight as you described added. With these modifications a lot of Germans got surprised in a dive when the 38 caught them.:)
 

caryc

Hawkeye
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,848
Location
Southern California
Cary,
Quite a few planes will have the tail flap(elevator) and ailerons balanced like you describe. This allows for less stick pressure (along with other stuff) required by the pilot. The balance is done by having the weight forward of the hinge point/pins. It also helps eliminate flutter of the controls which can destroy the plane. In the 60s I was at a fly-in and saw a guy killed in a homebuilt due to aileron flutter which tore off the aileron and caused the plane to crash.
Early P-38s had a elevator buffet problems because of this. This kept them form diving at high speeds and allowed the enemy to escape. Later models had a dive flap added and a larger balance weight as you described added. With these modifications a lot of Germans got surprised in a dive when the 38 caught them.:)
Thank you Jim.
 

Latest posts

Top