45 ACP cyl Alternative

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Tommy F

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Jun 23, 2008
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I used to want ACP cylinders for all my BH and Vaqs. Then I tried 45 SW Schofield brass with a 185 wadcutter, 4.5 Titegroup. This is the most pleasant alternative load for light shooting. Have tried in many SA and DA revolvers, all with great sucess. Substitute a 200 RNFP if you have them.
 

Rodfac

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Mar 11, 2009
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Interesting idea, Tommy. Smaller case volume, better ignition as a possibility; but one more size of brass to keep on hand. Just a thought...how was the accuracy? Rodfac
 

bnewberry

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A couple of other alternatives:

Use your regular .45 brass and Trail Boss powder. You can achieve a light load of about 700 feet per second with a 200 grain bullet that will show good accuracy and low recoil. This is commonly used in Cowboy Action Shooting by some shooters.

There is a "Cowboy Special" .45 brass case available. This is case manufactured to be the same length and volume, roughly, of a .45 ACP but with a .45 Colt back end. These are also used by some Cowboy Action Shooters.

The advantage of the Cowboy Special over the Schofield is that the Schofield rim is greater in diameter than the .45 Colt so much so that it won't clear the star at the end of the cylinder in some revolvers.
 

Old Judge Creek

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bnewberry":2nk88gv8 said:
...
The advantage of the Cowboy Special over the Schofield is that the Schofield rim is greater in diameter than the .45 Colt so much so that it won't clear the star at the end of the cylinder in some revolvers.

I must be missing something here:

I have a brace of Uberti Schofield clones in 45 Colt and the 45 Schofield brass works far better in these revolvers than does any and all 45 Colt brass.

The smaller rims on the 45 Colt brass are such that the extractor star on the Schofields can (and occasionally does) "rock" over/around and pop over the rims causing a momentary pause while you fiddle with getting things back in order. This has never occurred when using the 45 Schofield brass.

So, while the Schofield brass is more extraction/ejection positive, the buildup of powder residue in the chambers from shooting the shorter cased ammo is a far bigger PITA to clean-up and maintain.

YMMV
 

bnewberry

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Old Judge Creek":4l9ck0kn said:
bnewberry":4l9ck0kn said:
...
The advantage of the Cowboy Special over the Schofield is that the Schofield rim is greater in diameter than the .45 Colt so much so that it won't clear the star at the end of the cylinder in some revolvers.

I must be missing something here:

I have a brace of Uberti Schofield clones in 45 Colt and the 45 Schofield brass works far better in these revolvers than does any and all 45 Colt brass.

The smaller rims on the 45 Colt brass are such that the extractor star on the Schofields can (and occasionally does) "rock" over/around and pop over the rims causing a momentary pause while you fiddle with getting things back in order. This has never occurred when using the 45 Schofield brass.

So, while the Schofield brass is more extraction/ejection positive, the buildup of powder residue in the chambers from shooting the shorter cased ammo is a far bigger PITA to clean-up and maintain.

YMMV

I don't think you are missing something. The smaller rim of the 45 Colt/.45 Special works better in some single action guns due to not interfering with the star at the rear of the cylinder.

In a double action gun, or a gun with unitized ejector like your gun, as long as it fits, the bigger rim is a good thing.

And you are also correct, the crud that is left behind in your cylinder when you use shorter cartridges can be a pain to clean.
 

Bucks Owin

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bnewberry":35iahf90 said:
Old Judge Creek":35iahf90 said:
bnewberry":35iahf90 said:
...
The advantage of the Cowboy Special over the Schofield is that the Schofield rim is greater in diameter than the .45 Colt so much so that it won't clear the star at the end of the cylinder in some revolvers.

I must be missing something here:

I have a brace of Uberti Schofield clones in 45 Colt and the 45 Schofield brass works far better in these revolvers than does any and all 45 Colt brass.

The smaller rims on the 45 Colt brass are such that the extractor star on the Schofields can (and occasionally does) "rock" over/around and pop over the rims causing a momentary pause while you fiddle with getting things back in order. This has never occurred when using the 45 Schofield brass.

So, while the Schofield brass is more extraction/ejection positive, the buildup of powder residue in the chambers from shooting the shorter cased ammo is a far bigger PITA to clean-up and maintain.

YMMV

I don't think you are missing something. The smaller rim of the 45 Colt/.45 Special works better in some single action guns due to not interfering with the star at the rear of the cylinder.

In a double action gun, or a gun with unitized ejector like your gun, as long as it fits, the bigger rim is a good thing.

And you are also correct, the crud that is left behind in your cylinder when you use shorter cartridges can be a pain to clean.
Now I'M missing something here. We're talking DOUBLE ACTION revolvers and the ejector star right? A SINGLE ACTION revolver has no such part.... :? (Has an ejector ROD)
 

Otony

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"Now I'M missing something here. We're talking DOUBLE ACTION revolvers and the ejector star right? A SINGLE ACTION revolver has no such part.... (Has an ejector ROD)"

Not all SINGLE ACTIONS my friend. The Schofield and other S&W Top Breaks all have an ejector star...and no ejector rod as on a Colt.
 

Driftwood Johnson

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Not all SINGLE ACTIONS my friend. The Schofield and other S&W Top Breaks all have an ejector star...and no ejector rod as on a Colt.

And that is exactly why the rim on the Schofield round was made larger in diameter than the 45 Colt round. Modern 45 Colt brass is usually right around .512 in diameter at the rim, 45 Schofield is around .520. But originally, the rim on 45 Colt was much smaller, not even as big as .512. I have some antique 45 Colt rounds in my cartridge collection with rims as small as .505 in diameter. No way any kind of extractor was going to get a grip on them, they were meant to be poked out from the inside by an ejector rod like on a Colt. All that little tiny rim was meant to do was keep the firing pin from shoving the round down into the chamber.
 

Tommy F

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Jun 23, 2008
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Northern cincinnati
I have had great accuracy at combat shooting distances. They also shot well offhand in BH at around 20 yards last week. As far as cylinder resiidue, I learned years ago to run a solvent soaked brush through the cylinders after shooting sessions works well and allows for chambering of full length brass. Also can consult Hodgon website for starting load for Titegroup and Colt brass. I believe it is 5 gr. Great discussions.
 

Bucks Owin

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Otony":1ktk94mz said:
"Now I'M missing something here. We're talking DOUBLE ACTION revolvers and the ejector star right? A SINGLE ACTION revolver has no such part.... (Has an ejector ROD)"

Not all SINGLE ACTIONS my friend. The Schofield and other S&W Top Breaks all have an ejector star...and no ejector rod as on a Colt.
Of course.. :oops: Had a brain fart there! :lol:
 

Muley Gil

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Oct 27, 2004
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Southwest VA USA
"I used to want ACP cylinders for all my BH and Vaqs. Then I tried 45 SW Schofield brass with a 185 wadcutter, 4.5 Titegroup. This is the most pleasant alternative load for light shooting. Have tried in many SA and DA revolvers, all with great sucess. Substitute a 200 RNFP if you have them."

Well, I think you are missing the point of a .45 ACP cylinder. Anyone can load .45 Colt brass from mild to wild. The aux cylinder enables one to fire a totally different cartridge in a revolver you already own.

During my cop days, I carried either a .45 ACP 1911 or a S&W M625 in .45 ACP. I had access to as much .45 ACP ammo as I could shoot. The rangemaster didn't mind me using some of this practice ammo in my Blackhawk, using the aux cylinder. Actually, I considered the .45 Colt cylinder as the spare, as I have shot much more ACP ammo through that Blackhawk than I have .45 Colt ammo.

I also had a friend modify the ACP cylinder to allow me to fire .45 Auto Rim rounds. So now I can shoot three different cartridges from the same gun. Plus, factory .45 ACP ammo is cheaper and more different loadings are available, my favorite being the 230 grain HydraShocks.
 
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