375 ruger recoil

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patrickjames

Single-Sixer
Joined
Nov 15, 2008
Messages
218
Location
northern california
Been thinking about buying a Ruger Hawkeye in 375 Ruger but I'm a little worried about the recoil.I have a Ruger #1 in .405 Win that I have no problem shooting.I was wondering if the recoil about the same? Thanks PJ
 

mcknight77

Blackhawk
Joined
Aug 12, 2003
Messages
657
Location
Caldwell, ID
Shouldn't be any worse. It will depend on whether you get the synthetic or wood stock. The synthetics seen to have a bit more "give" to them and lessens felt recoil.
 

AkRay

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 3, 2007
Messages
168
Location
USA
My friend Pete just bought one last week or the week before. If he manages to hold onto it long enough to shoot it, I can ask him how it is.
 

Silent Sam

Blackhawk
Joined
Feb 26, 2006
Messages
728
My experience is a bit different. I have a stainless/synthetic Hawkeye in 338WM and with 225gr and especially 250gr loads it is downright unpleasant benched and that is with a limbsaver pad. The stock pad got used for 3 shots before being replaced. A good friend has a 375 Alaskan and I have shot it with both 270gr and 300gr loads and it is noticeably heavier recoil, especially with the 300 grainers and that stock comes with a decent pad. The Alaskan is a relatively light 375 and recoils faster and heavier than any 375 H&H I have shot. 375's in that power range are normally a big push but that is not my opinion of the 375 Alaskan. I have not shot a #1 in 405 so I can't give a direct comparison but I have found big calibers more comfortable for me when stocked in wood. The 375 Alaskan is an excellent platform for what it was designed for but felt recoil is in the 'serious' range for me, more than a similarly stocked 338WM which is no pussycat in itself. Outside of a coastal Alaska bear hunt, which it would be ideal for btw, it definitely wouldn't be my first choice. Recoil is very subjective and ideally you should try one out before buying if possible. Let us know what you end up doing. Good luck.
 

Wrangler John

Bearcat
Joined
Mar 26, 2008
Messages
38
It should generate somewhere around 50-60 ft lbs of recoil. Hornady factory 270 grain ammo is listed as generating 4835 ft lbs of energy - that's a lot. I shoot a similar wildcat .375 that duplicates the .375 Ruger, however my stock was custom built to handle the recoil with a wide butt, sloping cheek rest and very straight pull. My barrel is 26" so velocity and recoil is up there.

Shooting off the bench will produce a mild concussion from the recoil, you'll get a headache. If you forget what you are doing, you will get smacked by the scope - real hard. That "big push" has one facet - it keeps coming back. If you forget and lean forward into the recoil, it will bruise you. Trick is to lean over at a 90 degree angle so recoil just pushes you back. If the forend isn't held down - muzzle flip will nail your forehead with the scope. Offhand same thing - you gotta hang on. Either way, these big bores will wear on you producing bruised shoulders, sore neck, etc.

This is not a cartridge for everyone, indeed it isn't needed for 99 percent of hunting. One thing is though, these big bores are usually very accurate, once flinching is controlled.
 

Ltdshooter

Single-Sixer
Joined
Nov 6, 2005
Messages
149
Location
Michigan
My 375 Ruger Alaskan is not bad at all - using both the 270 gr. and 300 gr. Hornady factory loads it is not a hard strike on the shoulder - more of a big push.
 

4Sixteen

Bearcat
Joined
Jan 7, 2010
Messages
84
Location
Up North
You can always make reduced loads for the big bores. No where does it say you have to use full power loads. That's what I do with my 416 Ruger Alaskan.
 

Ltdshooter

Single-Sixer
Joined
Nov 6, 2005
Messages
149
Location
Michigan
That is the great thing about the big bores! Reduced loads for target / playing around and deer sized game. Medium loads loads for things that need more power and full out slammer loads for the time the rampaging elephant who broke away from the circus is crapping on your lawn and needs to be dealt with! While I'm not getting rid of the 30 and down calibers they are going to be sitting in the vault waiting for the most part to be handed down to my kids and all my shooting from here on out will pretty much be with 338's and up.
 

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